The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed



10 thoughts on “The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

  1. Jeanne Jeanne says:

    What fascinated me most about this book was how many famous Americans are really Hungarians I didn t know anything about Hungary before reading this, but I am driven to learnabout the recent past because of this book The movie Casablanca was directed by a Hungarian, and the story of its creation is entrancing The idea of a US atom bomb was launched and created by three Hungarians Who knew that Hungarians have been so influential in 20th century Western life Hungarians are the only peo What fascinated me most about this book was how many famous Americans are really Hungarians I didn t know anything about Hungary before reading this, but I am driven to learnabout the recent past because of this book The movie Casablanca was directed by a Hungarian, and the story of its creation is entrancing The idea of a US atom bomb was launched and created by three Hungarians Who knew that Hungarians have been so influential in 20th century Western life Hungarians are the only peopl ein Europe without racial or linguistic relatives in Europe, therefor they are the loneliest on this continent Thisperhaps explains the peculiar intensity of their existence Arthus KoestlerIf you enjoy 20th century history, especially WWI WWII, you will enjoy this book


  2. Marcia Fine Marcia Fine says:

    I loved the history in this book It brought together the movie industry, the Manhattan Project and photography There were so many famous names that influenced America A most impressive work Read this book as well as The Invisible Bridge


  3. Suesantaylor Suesantaylor says:

    Just finished Enemies of the People not dreaming that this could be as good, if not better But it is Marton is a terrific writer.


  4. Sandy Sandy says:

    Fabulous read Inspiring and telling The story reveals the personal side of some great, historic accomplishments from the dismal and horrific time of Hitler These 9 Jews changed the world as we know it they pioneered advancements in science, photography, and literature Sometimes it was hard to keep track of the facts as most of the men changed their given names to escape Hitler and assimilate into Europe or America The scientists associated with Einstein pioneered the nuclear age and then, Fabulous read Inspiring and telling The story reveals the personal side of some great, historic accomplishments from the dismal and horrific time of Hitler These 9 Jews changed the world as we know it they pioneered advancements in science, photography, and literature Sometimes it was hard to keep track of the facts as most of the men changed their given names to escape Hitler and assimilate into Europe or America The scientists associated with Einstein pioneered the nuclear age and then, when realizing the hazard that would become, they put their time and energy into pulling it back as best they could They were at odds with each other at times yet remained steadfast friends One of the group spearheaded what we know call photojournalism one went on to become one of the great movie directors Casablanca , and another a world famous photographer best known for his work as a war photographer A great read for anyone interested in recent history or history of the early 20th century


  5. Wendy Wendy says:

    I give this book zero stars.Since my father was one of the nine who escaped, I was interested in this book As I read I found the material superficial, with cute stories cherry picked, but nothing especially new or insightful There are so many better books written about these people and these times Among them are Budapest 1900 by John Lukacs, Weimar Culture by Peter Gray, His Version of the Facts by Leo Szilard, Genius in the Shadows by William Lanouette, The Recollections of Eugene P Wigner I give this book zero stars.Since my father was one of the nine who escaped, I was interested in this book As I read I found the material superficial, with cute stories cherry picked, but nothing especially new or insightful There are so many better books written about these people and these times Among them are Budapest 1900 by John Lukacs, Weimar Culture by Peter Gray, His Version of the Facts by Leo Szilard, Genius in the Shadows by William Lanouette, The Recollections of Eugene P Wigner, and forgive me, this is self serving my father s book, Memoirs A Twentieth Century Journey in Science and Politics Compared to these books, The Great Escape is thin soup.But when I got to the middle of the book, Ms Marton started attributing intent to people s actions which she could not possibly know Then I hit upon incidents in which I was involved These were misrepresented I tried to look in her notes to discover whether Ms Marton had rewritten history or whether she depended on someone who had committed that sin Her notes were long She did many interviews and she read many books But there was no way to discover how Ms Marton got the facts she was reporting.I suggest, if you are interested in this time and these people, you try another book


  6. Michael Lewyn Michael Lewyn says:

    A mildly interesting book about some very gifted men who had two things in common 1 growing up in Hungary and 2 leaving for England or the UK before World War II I note that despite the subtitle, not all of them fled Hitler All left Hungary some years before World War II, and not all left Europe because of fascism or even left after Hitler took power in 1933 For example, Michael Curtiz moved to the United States in 1926 to further his career.


  7. Carl R. Carl R. says:

    Kati Marton s The Great Escape is an eye opener How many of us know that turn of the century Budapest was a world unique hotbed of intellectual and artistic activity where Jews participated on an equal basis with gentiles Not me Nor did I know that when it all fell apart during and after WWI, when Hungary lost its seaport in the Versailles Trianon carveup, when poverty and despotism took over so much of Eastern Europe, these same prosperous Jews became worse and worse off as the century progr Kati Marton s The Great Escape is an eye opener How many of us know that turn of the century Budapest was a world unique hotbed of intellectual and artistic activity where Jews participated on an equal basis with gentiles Not me Nor did I know that when it all fell apart during and after WWI, when Hungary lost its seaport in the Versailles Trianon carveup, when poverty and despotism took over so much of Eastern Europe, these same prosperous Jews became worse and worse off as the century progressed Most of all, I did not know that a good number of them migrated to Berlin and or Paris, thence to America and or Britain and helped profoundly change our history and culture Here are the names of the nine men whose history Marton traces in The Great Escape Eugene Wigner, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Arthur Koestler, Michael Curtiz, Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz,and Alexander Korda I recognized Teller s name, of course, and Koestler s, but was chagrined at my ignorance about the others Wigner won the nobel prize in physics von Neumann virtually invented the computer Curtiz directed Casablanca and dozensfamous films Korda based himself in London and directed equally renowned if less famous films The Third Man with Orson Welles is perhaps his most highly regarded Kertesz was a pioneer in photography with a reputation among artists right up there with Henri Carier Bresson s Capa s achievements as a photo journalist are unsurpassed, especially when it comes to war photography Four of these guys Wigner, Szilard, Teller, and von Neumann worked on the Manhattan project and subsequently became involved in bomb politics on opposite sides Isn t that enough Not quite Marton also alludes to people whose stories she doesn t detail Over a dozen Nobel Prize winners emerged from roughly the same generation of Hungarians there is some dispute as to their numbers, twelve to eighteen, depending on whether one counts areas of the county of country the Treaty of Trianon stripped away in 1920 Among them were George de Hevesy, John Polanyi, and George Olah, awarded nobel Prizes in chemistry, Albert Szent Gyorgyi and Georg von Bekesy, awarded Nobel Prizes in medicine Dennis Gabor and Plilipp Lenard, who joined Eugene Wigner in winning the physics Nobel and in economics, John Harasanyi, who won a Nobel for his work in Game Theory, the field pioneered by von Neumann, whose early death probably denied him his own Nobel There were others not all of them Nobel laureates Marcel Breuer designed his famous chair and other Bauhaus masterpieces, as well as the Whitney Museum in New York Bela Bartok s disturbing harmonies started in Budapest and reached the world For decades, Bartok s students, as well as other products of Budapest s Franz Liszt Academy, among them Fritz Reiner, Geroge Szell, Eugene Ormandy, Georg Solti, and Anatal Dorati, created the sound of the world s great orchestras For some reason Marton did not include the Gabor sisters on her list Maybe they were edited out for space reasons At any rate, she chose the subjects of her history well, for all of these men led exciting, disturbing, and historically significant lives which should be better known than they are Her writing is lively, and the book is structured to keep the narrative moving without losing track of any of the individual stories Oh, and don t let me forget the dozens of terrific photos They range in subject and style from a snapshot of Koestler and Langston Hughes picking cotton in Turkmenistan to some of Kertesz and Capa s best work I wonder that this book and its content haven t receivedplay in the press There s nosignificant story in the twentieth century and it deserves to be broadcast as widely as possible Footnote In July, I did a review on this website of Arthur Phillips Prague, which inexplicably takes place mostly in Budapest Like all such travel and reading, the geography and color I picked up from that novel enhanced my enjoyment of The Great Escape An intimate knowledge of Budapest is not an absolute prerequisite, but you will getout of it if you google a bit of history and geography beyond the map Marton provides in the opening of the book


  8. Evelyn Evelyn says:

    After I finished Marton s Paris A Love Story I wasn t sure I d want to read anything else by her I d liked her book on Wallenberg well enough, but found some parts a bit ponderous It felt like she had a mission, which she completedthan adequately, but her prose didn t fully resonate After those 2 books I wondered, quite frankly, how she d earned her stellar reputation as a writer, and suspected that perhaps she d benefited from the company she kept rather than her actual abilities Si After I finished Marton s Paris A Love Story I wasn t sure I d want to read anything else by her I d liked her book on Wallenberg well enough, but found some parts a bit ponderous It felt like she had a mission, which she completedthan adequately, but her prose didn t fully resonate After those 2 books I wondered, quite frankly, how she d earned her stellar reputation as a writer, and suspected that perhaps she d benefited from the company she kept rather than her actual abilities Since the subject of this book was of interest to me I figured I d give her onechance And I wasn t disappointed From the very beginning this book had me hooked Marton profiles 9 Jewish Hungarian expats, all men who were born either at the end of the 19th or the beginning of the 20th century Each was raised in Hungary, spent some formative years in an open, liberal, intellectual Budapest, either at its zenith, or as those years were waning, and each left the country when anti Semitism became the national platform after the fall of the Austro Hungarian empire Each went on to earn international acclaim in a variety of fields 4 physicists including one future Nobel winner Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Eugene Wigner and Leo Szilard , 2 photographers Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz , one writer Arthur Koestler , one director Mike Curtiz of Casablanca fame and one producer Alexander Korda and each was a star in his own right, though none were acclaimed in Hungary till years later if at all.Marton s prose are well crafted and on occasion utterly beautiful her paragaphs on how much the birth of Israel and being there to see it, meant to Arthur Koestler, Robert Capa and Martha Gellhorn brought tears to my eyes I thought she managed to bring each of these gentlemen to life fluidly One of the reason I believe this book worked so well was that the overall subject was so close to Marton s own life and experience After an oppressive early childhood in Hungary, during which for some of the time her parents were jailed, in 1956 the Marton family escaped to the west where they lived as expats in much the same way Marton s subjects did Of course, her subjects flourished before, during and after WWII, earlier than Marton s own experiences But the similarities are strong And perhaps of equal importance, by the time Marton began working on this book, the secret of her Jewish origins had been revealed to her, and she clearly felt a kinship to each of these men One tiny quibble I do wish there had been at least one woman among her subjects ceramicist Eva Zeissel perhaps , but the gender imbalance doesn t really detract from the overall effect of the book


  9. Paul Paul says:

    At end of summer in my last trip to Alaska, one of the parishioners in Petersburg lent me The Great Escape This was not the World War ii escape from a German prison camp but the escape from Hitler The subtitle was The Great Escape, Nine Jews who Fled Hitler and Changed the World It was written by an expatriate Hungarian The 9 Hungarians mentioned are an incredible group Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner Wigner, Szilard to Einstein to At end of summer in my last trip to Alaska, one of the parishioners in Petersburg lent me The Great Escape This was not the World War ii escape from a German prison camp but the escape from Hitler The subtitle was The Great Escape, Nine Jews who Fled Hitler and Changed the World It was written by an expatriate Hungarian The 9 Hungarians mentioned are an incredible group Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner Wigner, Szilard to Einstein to start the Manhattan project ,Michael Curtiz Casablanca , Alexander Korda propaganda, That Hamilton Woman and Arthur Koestler.Some great quotes Hungarians are the only people in Europe without racial or linguistic relatives in Europe, therefore they are the loneliest on this continent This perhaps explains the peculiar intensity of their existence Hopeless solitude feeds their creativity, their desire for achieving To be Hungarian is a collective neurosis Arthur Koestler pp 210 211 But success could never fill his well of pessimism A dispassionate observer from aadvanced planet, he wrote, who could take in human history from Cro Mangon to Auschwitz would come to the conclusion that our race is a very sick biological product there is the striking disparity between the growth curves of science and technology on the one hand, and of ethical conduct on the other Since the day when the first atomic bomb outshone the sun over Hiroshima, he concluded, mankind as a whole has had to live with the prospect of its extinction as a species


  10. Karmen Karmen says:

    Interesting to be reading about Hungary as the Syrian refugee crisis seemed to highlight its current xenophobia.A mindset so far from the Golden Age of 1870 1910, experienced so soon after Hungary s war for independence was cruelly extinguishes in 1848 In 1867 Hungary s capital Budapest would become co capital of the Austro Hungarian Habsburg empire.A generation later, Hungary would experience a period of great advances in the arts sciences Its Golden Age, 1870 1910, presented the world so Interesting to be reading about Hungary as the Syrian refugee crisis seemed to highlight its current xenophobia.A mindset so far from the Golden Age of 1870 1910, experienced so soon after Hungary s war for independence was cruelly extinguishes in 1848 In 1867 Hungary s capital Budapest would become co capital of the Austro Hungarian Habsburg empire.A generation later, Hungary would experience a period of great advances in the arts sciences Its Golden Age, 1870 1910, presented the world so much by so few including the persons below Scientists Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner and John von Neuman.Writer Arthur KoestlerPhotographer director Robert CapaPhotographer Andre KerteszFilmmaker Alexander Korda Michael CurtizThe gentleman outlined in this book give much credit to Budapest s cafe culture as much as the rigorous learning schooling available in Austria Hungary Germany at the time.Their journey from Hungary as it journeyed from an open society to a fascist anti Jewish one mirrored the rise of fascism Hitler As a result, they were uniquely positioned to see the danger in Hitler s rise to power.The book is a great introduction to the lives of these gentleman as they brought so much to the general public Physics, photojournalism, etc


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The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World [Reading] ➶ The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World ➬ Kati Marton – Polishdarling.co.uk The Great Escape is the story of the breathtaking journey of nine extraordinary men from war torn Budapest to freedom, what they experienced along their dangerous route, and how they changed the world The Great Escape is the story of Escape: Nine ePUB ¹ the breathtaking journey of nine extraordinary men from war torn Budapest to freedom, what they experienced along their dangerous route, and how they changed the world.


10 thoughts on “The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

  1. Jeanne Jeanne says:

    What fascinated me most about this book was how many famous Americans are really Hungarians I didn t know anything about Hungary before reading this, but I am driven to learnabout the recent past because of this book The movie Casablanca was directed by a Hungarian, and the story of its creation is entrancing The idea of a US atom bomb was launched and created by three Hungarians Who knew that Hungarians have been so influential in 20th century Western life Hungarians are the only peo What fascinated me most about this book was how many famous Americans are really Hungarians I didn t know anything about Hungary before reading this, but I am driven to learnabout the recent past because of this book The movie Casablanca was directed by a Hungarian, and the story of its creation is entrancing The idea of a US atom bomb was launched and created by three Hungarians Who knew that Hungarians have been so influential in 20th century Western life Hungarians are the only peopl ein Europe without racial or linguistic relatives in Europe, therefor they are the loneliest on this continent Thisperhaps explains the peculiar intensity of their existence Arthus KoestlerIf you enjoy 20th century history, especially WWI WWII, you will enjoy this book


  2. Marcia Fine Marcia Fine says:

    I loved the history in this book It brought together the movie industry, the Manhattan Project and photography There were so many famous names that influenced America A most impressive work Read this book as well as The Invisible Bridge


  3. Suesantaylor Suesantaylor says:

    Just finished Enemies of the People not dreaming that this could be as good, if not better But it is Marton is a terrific writer.


  4. Sandy Sandy says:

    Fabulous read Inspiring and telling The story reveals the personal side of some great, historic accomplishments from the dismal and horrific time of Hitler These 9 Jews changed the world as we know it they pioneered advancements in science, photography, and literature Sometimes it was hard to keep track of the facts as most of the men changed their given names to escape Hitler and assimilate into Europe or America The scientists associated with Einstein pioneered the nuclear age and then, Fabulous read Inspiring and telling The story reveals the personal side of some great, historic accomplishments from the dismal and horrific time of Hitler These 9 Jews changed the world as we know it they pioneered advancements in science, photography, and literature Sometimes it was hard to keep track of the facts as most of the men changed their given names to escape Hitler and assimilate into Europe or America The scientists associated with Einstein pioneered the nuclear age and then, when realizing the hazard that would become, they put their time and energy into pulling it back as best they could They were at odds with each other at times yet remained steadfast friends One of the group spearheaded what we know call photojournalism one went on to become one of the great movie directors Casablanca , and another a world famous photographer best known for his work as a war photographer A great read for anyone interested in recent history or history of the early 20th century


  5. Wendy Wendy says:

    I give this book zero stars.Since my father was one of the nine who escaped, I was interested in this book As I read I found the material superficial, with cute stories cherry picked, but nothing especially new or insightful There are so many better books written about these people and these times Among them are Budapest 1900 by John Lukacs, Weimar Culture by Peter Gray, His Version of the Facts by Leo Szilard, Genius in the Shadows by William Lanouette, The Recollections of Eugene P Wigner I give this book zero stars.Since my father was one of the nine who escaped, I was interested in this book As I read I found the material superficial, with cute stories cherry picked, but nothing especially new or insightful There are so many better books written about these people and these times Among them are Budapest 1900 by John Lukacs, Weimar Culture by Peter Gray, His Version of the Facts by Leo Szilard, Genius in the Shadows by William Lanouette, The Recollections of Eugene P Wigner, and forgive me, this is self serving my father s book, Memoirs A Twentieth Century Journey in Science and Politics Compared to these books, The Great Escape is thin soup.But when I got to the middle of the book, Ms Marton started attributing intent to people s actions which she could not possibly know Then I hit upon incidents in which I was involved These were misrepresented I tried to look in her notes to discover whether Ms Marton had rewritten history or whether she depended on someone who had committed that sin Her notes were long She did many interviews and she read many books But there was no way to discover how Ms Marton got the facts she was reporting.I suggest, if you are interested in this time and these people, you try another book


  6. Michael Lewyn Michael Lewyn says:

    A mildly interesting book about some very gifted men who had two things in common 1 growing up in Hungary and 2 leaving for England or the UK before World War II I note that despite the subtitle, not all of them fled Hitler All left Hungary some years before World War II, and not all left Europe because of fascism or even left after Hitler took power in 1933 For example, Michael Curtiz moved to the United States in 1926 to further his career.


  7. Carl R. Carl R. says:

    Kati Marton s The Great Escape is an eye opener How many of us know that turn of the century Budapest was a world unique hotbed of intellectual and artistic activity where Jews participated on an equal basis with gentiles Not me Nor did I know that when it all fell apart during and after WWI, when Hungary lost its seaport in the Versailles Trianon carveup, when poverty and despotism took over so much of Eastern Europe, these same prosperous Jews became worse and worse off as the century progr Kati Marton s The Great Escape is an eye opener How many of us know that turn of the century Budapest was a world unique hotbed of intellectual and artistic activity where Jews participated on an equal basis with gentiles Not me Nor did I know that when it all fell apart during and after WWI, when Hungary lost its seaport in the Versailles Trianon carveup, when poverty and despotism took over so much of Eastern Europe, these same prosperous Jews became worse and worse off as the century progressed Most of all, I did not know that a good number of them migrated to Berlin and or Paris, thence to America and or Britain and helped profoundly change our history and culture Here are the names of the nine men whose history Marton traces in The Great Escape Eugene Wigner, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Arthur Koestler, Michael Curtiz, Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz,and Alexander Korda I recognized Teller s name, of course, and Koestler s, but was chagrined at my ignorance about the others Wigner won the nobel prize in physics von Neumann virtually invented the computer Curtiz directed Casablanca and dozensfamous films Korda based himself in London and directed equally renowned if less famous films The Third Man with Orson Welles is perhaps his most highly regarded Kertesz was a pioneer in photography with a reputation among artists right up there with Henri Carier Bresson s Capa s achievements as a photo journalist are unsurpassed, especially when it comes to war photography Four of these guys Wigner, Szilard, Teller, and von Neumann worked on the Manhattan project and subsequently became involved in bomb politics on opposite sides Isn t that enough Not quite Marton also alludes to people whose stories she doesn t detail Over a dozen Nobel Prize winners emerged from roughly the same generation of Hungarians there is some dispute as to their numbers, twelve to eighteen, depending on whether one counts areas of the county of country the Treaty of Trianon stripped away in 1920 Among them were George de Hevesy, John Polanyi, and George Olah, awarded nobel Prizes in chemistry, Albert Szent Gyorgyi and Georg von Bekesy, awarded Nobel Prizes in medicine Dennis Gabor and Plilipp Lenard, who joined Eugene Wigner in winning the physics Nobel and in economics, John Harasanyi, who won a Nobel for his work in Game Theory, the field pioneered by von Neumann, whose early death probably denied him his own Nobel There were others not all of them Nobel laureates Marcel Breuer designed his famous chair and other Bauhaus masterpieces, as well as the Whitney Museum in New York Bela Bartok s disturbing harmonies started in Budapest and reached the world For decades, Bartok s students, as well as other products of Budapest s Franz Liszt Academy, among them Fritz Reiner, Geroge Szell, Eugene Ormandy, Georg Solti, and Anatal Dorati, created the sound of the world s great orchestras For some reason Marton did not include the Gabor sisters on her list Maybe they were edited out for space reasons At any rate, she chose the subjects of her history well, for all of these men led exciting, disturbing, and historically significant lives which should be better known than they are Her writing is lively, and the book is structured to keep the narrative moving without losing track of any of the individual stories Oh, and don t let me forget the dozens of terrific photos They range in subject and style from a snapshot of Koestler and Langston Hughes picking cotton in Turkmenistan to some of Kertesz and Capa s best work I wonder that this book and its content haven t receivedplay in the press There s nosignificant story in the twentieth century and it deserves to be broadcast as widely as possible Footnote In July, I did a review on this website of Arthur Phillips Prague, which inexplicably takes place mostly in Budapest Like all such travel and reading, the geography and color I picked up from that novel enhanced my enjoyment of The Great Escape An intimate knowledge of Budapest is not an absolute prerequisite, but you will getout of it if you google a bit of history and geography beyond the map Marton provides in the opening of the book


  8. Evelyn Evelyn says:

    After I finished Marton s Paris A Love Story I wasn t sure I d want to read anything else by her I d liked her book on Wallenberg well enough, but found some parts a bit ponderous It felt like she had a mission, which she completedthan adequately, but her prose didn t fully resonate After those 2 books I wondered, quite frankly, how she d earned her stellar reputation as a writer, and suspected that perhaps she d benefited from the company she kept rather than her actual abilities Si After I finished Marton s Paris A Love Story I wasn t sure I d want to read anything else by her I d liked her book on Wallenberg well enough, but found some parts a bit ponderous It felt like she had a mission, which she completedthan adequately, but her prose didn t fully resonate After those 2 books I wondered, quite frankly, how she d earned her stellar reputation as a writer, and suspected that perhaps she d benefited from the company she kept rather than her actual abilities Since the subject of this book was of interest to me I figured I d give her onechance And I wasn t disappointed From the very beginning this book had me hooked Marton profiles 9 Jewish Hungarian expats, all men who were born either at the end of the 19th or the beginning of the 20th century Each was raised in Hungary, spent some formative years in an open, liberal, intellectual Budapest, either at its zenith, or as those years were waning, and each left the country when anti Semitism became the national platform after the fall of the Austro Hungarian empire Each went on to earn international acclaim in a variety of fields 4 physicists including one future Nobel winner Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Eugene Wigner and Leo Szilard , 2 photographers Robert Capa and Andre Kertesz , one writer Arthur Koestler , one director Mike Curtiz of Casablanca fame and one producer Alexander Korda and each was a star in his own right, though none were acclaimed in Hungary till years later if at all.Marton s prose are well crafted and on occasion utterly beautiful her paragaphs on how much the birth of Israel and being there to see it, meant to Arthur Koestler, Robert Capa and Martha Gellhorn brought tears to my eyes I thought she managed to bring each of these gentlemen to life fluidly One of the reason I believe this book worked so well was that the overall subject was so close to Marton s own life and experience After an oppressive early childhood in Hungary, during which for some of the time her parents were jailed, in 1956 the Marton family escaped to the west where they lived as expats in much the same way Marton s subjects did Of course, her subjects flourished before, during and after WWII, earlier than Marton s own experiences But the similarities are strong And perhaps of equal importance, by the time Marton began working on this book, the secret of her Jewish origins had been revealed to her, and she clearly felt a kinship to each of these men One tiny quibble I do wish there had been at least one woman among her subjects ceramicist Eva Zeissel perhaps , but the gender imbalance doesn t really detract from the overall effect of the book


  9. Paul Paul says:

    At end of summer in my last trip to Alaska, one of the parishioners in Petersburg lent me The Great Escape This was not the World War ii escape from a German prison camp but the escape from Hitler The subtitle was The Great Escape, Nine Jews who Fled Hitler and Changed the World It was written by an expatriate Hungarian The 9 Hungarians mentioned are an incredible group Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner Wigner, Szilard to Einstein to At end of summer in my last trip to Alaska, one of the parishioners in Petersburg lent me The Great Escape This was not the World War ii escape from a German prison camp but the escape from Hitler The subtitle was The Great Escape, Nine Jews who Fled Hitler and Changed the World It was written by an expatriate Hungarian The 9 Hungarians mentioned are an incredible group Robert Capa, Andre Kertesz, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner Wigner, Szilard to Einstein to start the Manhattan project ,Michael Curtiz Casablanca , Alexander Korda propaganda, That Hamilton Woman and Arthur Koestler.Some great quotes Hungarians are the only people in Europe without racial or linguistic relatives in Europe, therefore they are the loneliest on this continent This perhaps explains the peculiar intensity of their existence Hopeless solitude feeds their creativity, their desire for achieving To be Hungarian is a collective neurosis Arthur Koestler pp 210 211 But success could never fill his well of pessimism A dispassionate observer from aadvanced planet, he wrote, who could take in human history from Cro Mangon to Auschwitz would come to the conclusion that our race is a very sick biological product there is the striking disparity between the growth curves of science and technology on the one hand, and of ethical conduct on the other Since the day when the first atomic bomb outshone the sun over Hiroshima, he concluded, mankind as a whole has had to live with the prospect of its extinction as a species


  10. Karmen Karmen says:

    Interesting to be reading about Hungary as the Syrian refugee crisis seemed to highlight its current xenophobia.A mindset so far from the Golden Age of 1870 1910, experienced so soon after Hungary s war for independence was cruelly extinguishes in 1848 In 1867 Hungary s capital Budapest would become co capital of the Austro Hungarian Habsburg empire.A generation later, Hungary would experience a period of great advances in the arts sciences Its Golden Age, 1870 1910, presented the world so Interesting to be reading about Hungary as the Syrian refugee crisis seemed to highlight its current xenophobia.A mindset so far from the Golden Age of 1870 1910, experienced so soon after Hungary s war for independence was cruelly extinguishes in 1848 In 1867 Hungary s capital Budapest would become co capital of the Austro Hungarian Habsburg empire.A generation later, Hungary would experience a period of great advances in the arts sciences Its Golden Age, 1870 1910, presented the world so much by so few including the persons below Scientists Leo Szilard, Edward Teller, Eugene Wigner and John von Neuman.Writer Arthur KoestlerPhotographer director Robert CapaPhotographer Andre KerteszFilmmaker Alexander Korda Michael CurtizThe gentleman outlined in this book give much credit to Budapest s cafe culture as much as the rigorous learning schooling available in Austria Hungary Germany at the time.Their journey from Hungary as it journeyed from an open society to a fascist anti Jewish one mirrored the rise of fascism Hitler As a result, they were uniquely positioned to see the danger in Hitler s rise to power.The book is a great introduction to the lives of these gentleman as they brought so much to the general public Physics, photojournalism, etc


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