Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy (Reality of the Psyche)

Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in

Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy (Reality of the Psyche) ❰Read❯ ➲ Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy (Reality of the Psyche) Author Edward F. Edinger – Polishdarling.co.uk Edinger has greatly enriched my understanding of psychology through the avenue of alchemy No other contribution has been as helpful as this for revealing, in a word, the anatomy of the psyche and how Edinger has greatly enriched my understanding the Psyche: MOBI · of psychology through the avenue of alchemy No other contribution Anatomy of Kindle - has been as helpful as this for revealing, in a word, the anatomy of the psyche and of the Psyche: eBook ↠ how it applies to where one is in his or her process This is a significant amplification and extension of Jung s work Two hundred years from now, it will still be a useful handbook and an inspiring aid to those who care about individuation Psychological Perspectives.


About the Author: Edward F. Edinger

Dr Edward F Edinger, MD was the Psyche: MOBI · a leading Jungian psychoanalyst and a founding member of the Anatomy of Kindle - CG Jung Foundation, in Manhattan, as well as the CG Jung Institute of New York He was of the Psyche: eBook ↠ the institute s president from to , when he moved to Los Angeles, where continued his practice for years and became a senior analyst at the CG Jung Institute of Los Angeles He previously served as a medical officer in the United States Army in Panama.



10 thoughts on “Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy (Reality of the Psyche)

  1. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    My therapist, a Jungian analyst, recommended this book to me when I started referring to alchemical concepts in the therapy room I told her that my dreams, and other upwellings from my unconscious, reminded me of the alchemical concepts of nigredo and albedo, even though I hadn t studied or read about these concepts, or alchemy in general, for years This triggered a renewed interest in the subject, and my cursory review of material about alchemy on the Internet gave me some basic ideas to My therapist, a Jungian analyst, recommended this book to me when I started referring to alchemical concepts in the therapy room I told her that my dreams, and other upwellings from my unconscious, reminded me of the alchemical concepts of nigredo and albedo, even though I hadn t studied or read about these concepts, or alchemy in general, for years This triggered a renewed interest in the subject, and my cursory review of material about alchemy on the Internet gave me some basic ideas to work with, but I yearned for a clearer map of the mysterious process of transformation that seemed to be unfolding within me My therapist s recommendation was spot on, as this book provided aperfect map than I ever anticipated finding To be clear, as academic as this book is in its style and substance, it is also very intuitive and mystical, and the map it provides is not linear It does not describe a series of steps or stages, but rather different dynamics that can occur at any time and in any order Edinger makes clear that each process tends to lead to another, and the way the spiral of transformation unfolds depends on the unique elements that make up an individual life Thus while Anatomy of the Psyche did not give me a fixed, universal standard to measure myself against, it did indeed deepen my understanding of my dreams and my psyche, showing me how to tune in to the elemental quality of what I am experiencing to understand what most needs my attention.Edinger proceeds from Jung s conclusion that the alchemists projected their inner states onto their observations in the lab, and for this reason alchemical imagery is highly relevant to inner work, especially that inner work which uses dreams as a gateway to the unconscious In the examples Edinger uses, he also shows how these symbols and the dynamics to which they refer far predate the alchemical era, showing up in Greek myths and the Bible, among other places.Edinger s approach is to begin each chapter with a description of the physical process as the alchemists observed it, citing alchemical works and including images from those works He then proceeds to its appearance in literature and religious myth, quoting poems and showing images from related illustrations and art He then explores how these dynamics apply to Jungian therapy, sharing examples of alchemical imagery from his patients dreams and from their stories of personal growth and change.What is most profound about this book is how basic and universal these dynamics reveal themselves to be it s as if, as a reader, you re being given a key to the secrets of the living world It s easy in our day and age to see our periodic table of the elements and practical application of chemistry as superior in every way to the alchemists concepts of the four elements and the transmutation of matter However, modern chemistry is so specific that its knowledge often is only useful in a limited, applied arena it is harder to take away general principles from it What the alchemists recorded was part of their attempt to uncover a universal process, and as such, points to dynamics of change that can be everywhere observed in nature, as well as in ourselves.CALCINATIO Application of intense heat quickly removes impurities, but can destroy all but the most resilient objects In Game of Thrones, Daenerys s emergence from the flames is such a powerful image because it is so timeless, a reflection of a process anyone understands who has been through intense suffering or trauma We rarely choose calcination consciously as a path, but knowing how it can forge us can give us hope when we find ourselves raked over the coals.SOLUTIO When one material is made liquid and dissolved into another, whichever liquid is of greater volume takes precedence in the resulting mix Edinger likens this to how we lose ourselves in identification with a person or group that has acomprehensive perspective or complex mode of being than ourselves While this often produces feelings of euphoria, an erotic merging that is the subject of so many songs and poems, it is also threatening to a small and brittle ego, and this fear of engulfment is often the source of great strife and conflict People become frightened and aggressive when confronted with a viewpoint that could swallow their own.SUBLIMATIO Just as the process of solutio goes far in explaining many political and religious dynamics, so too does the process of sublimation, in which people flee from the particular and physical, subject as it is to decay, and recoil from what reminds them of the grossness of the body Yearning to identify with the eternal rather than the temporal, we reach for the intellect and the universal concepts at its command To transcend the limitations of the personal, we employ abstraction to overcome the power of instinct, we enlist reason Our desire to rise above has powered some of our greatest religious and philosophical insights, just as our desire to perfect the world has driven some of our greatest innovations in law and technology, but our search for transcendence has also alienated us from ourselves It has driven the antagonism toward the carnal that is part of so many religious traditions and has fueled a powerful collective shadow Edinger notes that modern individuals have had entirely too much sublimatio usually, we requirehelp with landing than with taking off.COAGULATIO While sublimation is a necessary operation for those who are overidentified with the body and trapped by desire, most people have a greater need for coagulation, to come back down to earth and make peace with the particulars of their lives and their bodies We are not abstractions, no matter how much we try to be Clearly, the alchemist could not do much with dry ash or invisible vapor, no matter how pure, just as we cannot put our ideals into motion if we can t enter into and live in the world In the journey of transformation, every time we break ourselves down, the inevitable next step will be to reform ourselves We then test this new form in the world to see how it stands up, and when it begins to restrict or block us, we must break it down again, but only so we can begin the process of building ourselves anew We must always coagulate to function The earth we so despise is what we most need.MORTIFICATIO Ultimately, any process of transformation is a process of death and rebirth A substance is first killed in its original form, then subjected to decay and ferment Its structure is collapsed and its constituent parts separate We are intensely afraid of this decomposition and our resistance to it paradoxically becomes a source of self destruction We do not wish to die, and in trying to avoid death, we neglect to live Willingly subjecting ourselves to experiences that involve an inner death can help us come to understand bodily death and fear it less Spiritual awakenings can feel like death, as can individuation in therapy Any time life requires of us a metamorphosis, it brings us through a death process, a shedding of an old form, persona, or way of living in the world While the ego will never be able to accept its fragility and temporality, we can come to accept death in understanding that it is the only way for the world to be renewed Nature teaches us that what appears to die is born again instinct and memory keep alive the old ways of animal and human ancestors, and nature perpetually renews itself on a yearly feast of death Given time andwork, material appears in a new form, carrying in it something of what came before CONIUNCTIO It turns out the greatest insight I took away from this book is the same as the greatest insight I took away from James Joyce s Ulysses in all things, there are seeming contradictions that cannot be fully resolved into one another we cease to know things as they really are when we try to force them to fit into the confines of a single, simple conclusion or view Theeasily we can shift from one perspective or mode to another, thefully we can see Theof its countless faces and facets we can hold in consciousness at once, thetruly we can know the world In trying to reduce things to an undifferentiated unity, we kill them, even as what motivates us is the desire for light, life, and good to conquer darkness, death, and evil We know the perfection of the world not by melting it down, but by becoming a clear mirror that can reflect it as it is The opus is realized when sun and moon, male and female, all that is seemingly contradictory, solidifies into a form in which these elements are unified but distinct, neither heterogeneous nor with one subsumed in the other The Philosopher s Stone is a new substance that contains nothing that was not originally there Dark and light, male and female, good and evil, pure and impure these dualities are in some ways a trick of the mind, but we can only see beyond them when we stop trying to reduce or eliminate them We only truly know ourselves when we stop excluding vital parts of ourselves from our conscious awareness and trapping them in our shadow The individuated, realized person is conscious of her multiplicity She is vital because none of her energies are blocked off The lamb and the wolf in her do not have to battle The wolf might eat the lamb sometimes, but she lets it be the lamb is always reborn She has an unconscious, but she is open, and listens she lets it bubble up into her conscious mind she looks into the darkness and sees, and is not afraid


  2. Abner Rosenweig Abner Rosenweig says:

    Edinger is a titan in depth psychology Consequently I had great expectations for this book and was a bit disappointed The research and scholarship are first rate, and the illustrations from classic alchemical texts are fantastic However, even though Edinger expresses up front that alchemical processes in psychology have no single linear progression and must be addressed through an examination of its various operations, the book places too much emphasis on the parts rather than the whole and, Edinger is a titan in depth psychology Consequently I had great expectations for this book and was a bit disappointed The research and scholarship are first rate, and the illustrations from classic alchemical texts are fantastic However, even though Edinger expresses up front that alchemical processes in psychology have no single linear progression and must be addressed through an examination of its various operations, the book places too much emphasis on the parts rather than the whole and, I feel, loses the forest in the trees I would have appreciated aholistic approach that emphasized how the processes work in concert to achieve transformation Also, while Edinger provides a good outline of what each alchemical operation is, he doesn t focus enough on how the processes operate in individual psychic transformation A case study illustrating the operations in practice would have been useful So, the book is a good resource, but to get a clearer sense of how alchemy operates in the psyche, I ll have to look elsewhere


  3. loudermilk loudermilk says:

    a dream can only swim in sleep, so here is the latest gasping mermaid my niece called me the best man ever, when I ball her up in my arms her little body sings to me and I press her tightly to my ear that wasn t the dream I killed ogres in another girl s dream last night, she had to tell me because dreams are a shameless kind of truth, or even an update the world that my niece lives in in my dream I m solid, unfound, running out of fuel, feeling dark, numb to dread the old problem of mi a dream can only swim in sleep, so here is the latest gasping mermaid my niece called me the best man ever, when I ball her up in my arms her little body sings to me and I press her tightly to my ear that wasn t the dream I killed ogres in another girl s dream last night, she had to tell me because dreams are a shameless kind of truth, or even an update the world that my niece lives in in my dream I m solid, unfound, running out of fuel, feeling dark, numb to dread the old problem of miniature deaths is bugging me out right now like, live in front of me quickly and show me your next little death then we ll carry on in another corner with someone else swan lake every night A fingertip so close to my eyes I can see the glittering pink details between the whorls and arches I must have put my face that close, I m an idiot, or a swoony baboon this is as close as I comfortably get, dreaming on table tops.It doesn t know I m there and it kills an ant on the table top, rolls it out in a disastrous gymnastic if it saw I was there it wouldn t have killed, I don t think It would have said to me you ARE a strange boy like a lioness is too tired to look at her nipping cubs there must be fingertips detonating thoughtlessly on lots of secret handsI want to test that I m really dead so I take off my clothes and stand in an underpass at night telling anyone who passes that I am here for them no one notices I start to laugh half way through my prayers send flowers to my mother


  4. Justin Michael Justin Michael says:

    A skeletal view of this book would be to say that Edinger codifies distinct occurrences of transformation in the life of the individual using alchemical terms of fire, water, dissolving, separation, death, and union It is possible to explore this book as an introduction to Jung s views on alchemy and the psyche but it certainly helps to have both read otherfundamental texts and experienced some of these transmutations first hand in order not to find oneself reading it too dryly, too acade A skeletal view of this book would be to say that Edinger codifies distinct occurrences of transformation in the life of the individual using alchemical terms of fire, water, dissolving, separation, death, and union It is possible to explore this book as an introduction to Jung s views on alchemy and the psyche but it certainly helps to have both read otherfundamental texts and experienced some of these transmutations first hand in order not to find oneself reading it too dryly, too academically It is a living book which gives name to many experiences of the numinous in day to day life I think it is to be enjoyed for its insight but also will bring forth some illumination to readers who have experienced alchemy operating invisibly in their own lives


  5. Brian Fagan Brian Fagan says:

    Edinger is the best at explaining and applying Jung s ideas.


  6. Edward Moran Edward Moran says:

    The Coagulatio chapter is couched in general enough terms that he can say he is not advocating breaking the law.


  7. David David says:

    A very good introduction into alchemy as a language describing the psyche and the process of Individuation I especially liked the last two chapters on Separatio and Coniunctio Separatio, the division into two, distinguishing of opposites, the creating a space through differentiation for the conscious ego to exist The Coniuctio, the Individuation, the bringing together of the opposites, the awareness by the conscious ego of the unconscious, bringing about a reciprocal reaction from the uncon A very good introduction into alchemy as a language describing the psyche and the process of Individuation I especially liked the last two chapters on Separatio and Coniunctio Separatio, the division into two, distinguishing of opposites, the creating a space through differentiation for the conscious ego to exist The Coniuctio, the Individuation, the bringing together of the opposites, the awareness by the conscious ego of the unconscious, bringing about a reciprocal reaction from the unconscious Self in a combined effort to find ameaningful life Together bringing aboutconsciousness in the Universe


  8. Kate Knowles Kate Knowles says:

    Reading this book was very transformative for me You can transform in your own life if you pick a personal issue prima materia in your life, choose an artistic medium to work with, and take your art through the various alchemical processes Working with the material facilitates psychic transformation and openings in your life Having a support group to support you as you go through the process is recommended Alchemy is a beautiful tool and this book is brilliant You learn about and work wit Reading this book was very transformative for me You can transform in your own life if you pick a personal issue prima materia in your life, choose an artistic medium to work with, and take your art through the various alchemical processes Working with the material facilitates psychic transformation and openings in your life Having a support group to support you as you go through the process is recommended Alchemy is a beautiful tool and this book is brilliant You learn about and work with the earth elements, water, fire, earth, sky, death, birth, ect


  9. Kenzie Kenzie says:

    The subject matter is so vast that books on the subject of alchemy inevitably feel disorganized, but Edinger nonetheless supplies much to reflect on I had trouble with the section on Separatio, which seemed to endorse a dualism that doesn t really fit with how I experience mind body And as with many Jungian books, I felt like the psychology of women gets short shrift Besides these complaints, I really enjoyed how Edinger connected a variety of symbols to the development of the psyche I have The subject matter is so vast that books on the subject of alchemy inevitably feel disorganized, but Edinger nonetheless supplies much to reflect on I had trouble with the section on Separatio, which seemed to endorse a dualism that doesn t really fit with how I experience mind body And as with many Jungian books, I felt like the psychology of women gets short shrift Besides these complaints, I really enjoyed how Edinger connected a variety of symbols to the development of the psyche I have a lot of pages folded down


  10. Wctiii Wctiii says:

    Cracks away at alchemy from a Jungian perspective in a well organized way, not skipping over the basics and not quite dumming it down either.


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10 thoughts on “Anatomy of the Psyche: Alchemical Symbolism in Psychotherapy (Reality of the Psyche)

  1. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    My therapist, a Jungian analyst, recommended this book to me when I started referring to alchemical concepts in the therapy room I told her that my dreams, and other upwellings from my unconscious, reminded me of the alchemical concepts of nigredo and albedo, even though I hadn t studied or read about these concepts, or alchemy in general, for years This triggered a renewed interest in the subject, and my cursory review of material about alchemy on the Internet gave me some basic ideas to My therapist, a Jungian analyst, recommended this book to me when I started referring to alchemical concepts in the therapy room I told her that my dreams, and other upwellings from my unconscious, reminded me of the alchemical concepts of nigredo and albedo, even though I hadn t studied or read about these concepts, or alchemy in general, for years This triggered a renewed interest in the subject, and my cursory review of material about alchemy on the Internet gave me some basic ideas to work with, but I yearned for a clearer map of the mysterious process of transformation that seemed to be unfolding within me My therapist s recommendation was spot on, as this book provided aperfect map than I ever anticipated finding To be clear, as academic as this book is in its style and substance, it is also very intuitive and mystical, and the map it provides is not linear It does not describe a series of steps or stages, but rather different dynamics that can occur at any time and in any order Edinger makes clear that each process tends to lead to another, and the way the spiral of transformation unfolds depends on the unique elements that make up an individual life Thus while Anatomy of the Psyche did not give me a fixed, universal standard to measure myself against, it did indeed deepen my understanding of my dreams and my psyche, showing me how to tune in to the elemental quality of what I am experiencing to understand what most needs my attention.Edinger proceeds from Jung s conclusion that the alchemists projected their inner states onto their observations in the lab, and for this reason alchemical imagery is highly relevant to inner work, especially that inner work which uses dreams as a gateway to the unconscious In the examples Edinger uses, he also shows how these symbols and the dynamics to which they refer far predate the alchemical era, showing up in Greek myths and the Bible, among other places.Edinger s approach is to begin each chapter with a description of the physical process as the alchemists observed it, citing alchemical works and including images from those works He then proceeds to its appearance in literature and religious myth, quoting poems and showing images from related illustrations and art He then explores how these dynamics apply to Jungian therapy, sharing examples of alchemical imagery from his patients dreams and from their stories of personal growth and change.What is most profound about this book is how basic and universal these dynamics reveal themselves to be it s as if, as a reader, you re being given a key to the secrets of the living world It s easy in our day and age to see our periodic table of the elements and practical application of chemistry as superior in every way to the alchemists concepts of the four elements and the transmutation of matter However, modern chemistry is so specific that its knowledge often is only useful in a limited, applied arena it is harder to take away general principles from it What the alchemists recorded was part of their attempt to uncover a universal process, and as such, points to dynamics of change that can be everywhere observed in nature, as well as in ourselves.CALCINATIO Application of intense heat quickly removes impurities, but can destroy all but the most resilient objects In Game of Thrones, Daenerys s emergence from the flames is such a powerful image because it is so timeless, a reflection of a process anyone understands who has been through intense suffering or trauma We rarely choose calcination consciously as a path, but knowing how it can forge us can give us hope when we find ourselves raked over the coals.SOLUTIO When one material is made liquid and dissolved into another, whichever liquid is of greater volume takes precedence in the resulting mix Edinger likens this to how we lose ourselves in identification with a person or group that has acomprehensive perspective or complex mode of being than ourselves While this often produces feelings of euphoria, an erotic merging that is the subject of so many songs and poems, it is also threatening to a small and brittle ego, and this fear of engulfment is often the source of great strife and conflict People become frightened and aggressive when confronted with a viewpoint that could swallow their own.SUBLIMATIO Just as the process of solutio goes far in explaining many political and religious dynamics, so too does the process of sublimation, in which people flee from the particular and physical, subject as it is to decay, and recoil from what reminds them of the grossness of the body Yearning to identify with the eternal rather than the temporal, we reach for the intellect and the universal concepts at its command To transcend the limitations of the personal, we employ abstraction to overcome the power of instinct, we enlist reason Our desire to rise above has powered some of our greatest religious and philosophical insights, just as our desire to perfect the world has driven some of our greatest innovations in law and technology, but our search for transcendence has also alienated us from ourselves It has driven the antagonism toward the carnal that is part of so many religious traditions and has fueled a powerful collective shadow Edinger notes that modern individuals have had entirely too much sublimatio usually, we requirehelp with landing than with taking off.COAGULATIO While sublimation is a necessary operation for those who are overidentified with the body and trapped by desire, most people have a greater need for coagulation, to come back down to earth and make peace with the particulars of their lives and their bodies We are not abstractions, no matter how much we try to be Clearly, the alchemist could not do much with dry ash or invisible vapor, no matter how pure, just as we cannot put our ideals into motion if we can t enter into and live in the world In the journey of transformation, every time we break ourselves down, the inevitable next step will be to reform ourselves We then test this new form in the world to see how it stands up, and when it begins to restrict or block us, we must break it down again, but only so we can begin the process of building ourselves anew We must always coagulate to function The earth we so despise is what we most need.MORTIFICATIO Ultimately, any process of transformation is a process of death and rebirth A substance is first killed in its original form, then subjected to decay and ferment Its structure is collapsed and its constituent parts separate We are intensely afraid of this decomposition and our resistance to it paradoxically becomes a source of self destruction We do not wish to die, and in trying to avoid death, we neglect to live Willingly subjecting ourselves to experiences that involve an inner death can help us come to understand bodily death and fear it less Spiritual awakenings can feel like death, as can individuation in therapy Any time life requires of us a metamorphosis, it brings us through a death process, a shedding of an old form, persona, or way of living in the world While the ego will never be able to accept its fragility and temporality, we can come to accept death in understanding that it is the only way for the world to be renewed Nature teaches us that what appears to die is born again instinct and memory keep alive the old ways of animal and human ancestors, and nature perpetually renews itself on a yearly feast of death Given time andwork, material appears in a new form, carrying in it something of what came before CONIUNCTIO It turns out the greatest insight I took away from this book is the same as the greatest insight I took away from James Joyce s Ulysses in all things, there are seeming contradictions that cannot be fully resolved into one another we cease to know things as they really are when we try to force them to fit into the confines of a single, simple conclusion or view Theeasily we can shift from one perspective or mode to another, thefully we can see Theof its countless faces and facets we can hold in consciousness at once, thetruly we can know the world In trying to reduce things to an undifferentiated unity, we kill them, even as what motivates us is the desire for light, life, and good to conquer darkness, death, and evil We know the perfection of the world not by melting it down, but by becoming a clear mirror that can reflect it as it is The opus is realized when sun and moon, male and female, all that is seemingly contradictory, solidifies into a form in which these elements are unified but distinct, neither heterogeneous nor with one subsumed in the other The Philosopher s Stone is a new substance that contains nothing that was not originally there Dark and light, male and female, good and evil, pure and impure these dualities are in some ways a trick of the mind, but we can only see beyond them when we stop trying to reduce or eliminate them We only truly know ourselves when we stop excluding vital parts of ourselves from our conscious awareness and trapping them in our shadow The individuated, realized person is conscious of her multiplicity She is vital because none of her energies are blocked off The lamb and the wolf in her do not have to battle The wolf might eat the lamb sometimes, but she lets it be the lamb is always reborn She has an unconscious, but she is open, and listens she lets it bubble up into her conscious mind she looks into the darkness and sees, and is not afraid


  2. Abner Rosenweig Abner Rosenweig says:

    Edinger is a titan in depth psychology Consequently I had great expectations for this book and was a bit disappointed The research and scholarship are first rate, and the illustrations from classic alchemical texts are fantastic However, even though Edinger expresses up front that alchemical processes in psychology have no single linear progression and must be addressed through an examination of its various operations, the book places too much emphasis on the parts rather than the whole and, Edinger is a titan in depth psychology Consequently I had great expectations for this book and was a bit disappointed The research and scholarship are first rate, and the illustrations from classic alchemical texts are fantastic However, even though Edinger expresses up front that alchemical processes in psychology have no single linear progression and must be addressed through an examination of its various operations, the book places too much emphasis on the parts rather than the whole and, I feel, loses the forest in the trees I would have appreciated aholistic approach that emphasized how the processes work in concert to achieve transformation Also, while Edinger provides a good outline of what each alchemical operation is, he doesn t focus enough on how the processes operate in individual psychic transformation A case study illustrating the operations in practice would have been useful So, the book is a good resource, but to get a clearer sense of how alchemy operates in the psyche, I ll have to look elsewhere


  3. loudermilk loudermilk says:

    a dream can only swim in sleep, so here is the latest gasping mermaid my niece called me the best man ever, when I ball her up in my arms her little body sings to me and I press her tightly to my ear that wasn t the dream I killed ogres in another girl s dream last night, she had to tell me because dreams are a shameless kind of truth, or even an update the world that my niece lives in in my dream I m solid, unfound, running out of fuel, feeling dark, numb to dread the old problem of mi a dream can only swim in sleep, so here is the latest gasping mermaid my niece called me the best man ever, when I ball her up in my arms her little body sings to me and I press her tightly to my ear that wasn t the dream I killed ogres in another girl s dream last night, she had to tell me because dreams are a shameless kind of truth, or even an update the world that my niece lives in in my dream I m solid, unfound, running out of fuel, feeling dark, numb to dread the old problem of miniature deaths is bugging me out right now like, live in front of me quickly and show me your next little death then we ll carry on in another corner with someone else swan lake every night A fingertip so close to my eyes I can see the glittering pink details between the whorls and arches I must have put my face that close, I m an idiot, or a swoony baboon this is as close as I comfortably get, dreaming on table tops.It doesn t know I m there and it kills an ant on the table top, rolls it out in a disastrous gymnastic if it saw I was there it wouldn t have killed, I don t think It would have said to me you ARE a strange boy like a lioness is too tired to look at her nipping cubs there must be fingertips detonating thoughtlessly on lots of secret handsI want to test that I m really dead so I take off my clothes and stand in an underpass at night telling anyone who passes that I am here for them no one notices I start to laugh half way through my prayers send flowers to my mother


  4. Justin Michael Justin Michael says:

    A skeletal view of this book would be to say that Edinger codifies distinct occurrences of transformation in the life of the individual using alchemical terms of fire, water, dissolving, separation, death, and union It is possible to explore this book as an introduction to Jung s views on alchemy and the psyche but it certainly helps to have both read otherfundamental texts and experienced some of these transmutations first hand in order not to find oneself reading it too dryly, too acade A skeletal view of this book would be to say that Edinger codifies distinct occurrences of transformation in the life of the individual using alchemical terms of fire, water, dissolving, separation, death, and union It is possible to explore this book as an introduction to Jung s views on alchemy and the psyche but it certainly helps to have both read otherfundamental texts and experienced some of these transmutations first hand in order not to find oneself reading it too dryly, too academically It is a living book which gives name to many experiences of the numinous in day to day life I think it is to be enjoyed for its insight but also will bring forth some illumination to readers who have experienced alchemy operating invisibly in their own lives


  5. Brian Fagan Brian Fagan says:

    Edinger is the best at explaining and applying Jung s ideas.


  6. Edward Moran Edward Moran says:

    The Coagulatio chapter is couched in general enough terms that he can say he is not advocating breaking the law.


  7. David David says:

    A very good introduction into alchemy as a language describing the psyche and the process of Individuation I especially liked the last two chapters on Separatio and Coniunctio Separatio, the division into two, distinguishing of opposites, the creating a space through differentiation for the conscious ego to exist The Coniuctio, the Individuation, the bringing together of the opposites, the awareness by the conscious ego of the unconscious, bringing about a reciprocal reaction from the uncon A very good introduction into alchemy as a language describing the psyche and the process of Individuation I especially liked the last two chapters on Separatio and Coniunctio Separatio, the division into two, distinguishing of opposites, the creating a space through differentiation for the conscious ego to exist The Coniuctio, the Individuation, the bringing together of the opposites, the awareness by the conscious ego of the unconscious, bringing about a reciprocal reaction from the unconscious Self in a combined effort to find ameaningful life Together bringing aboutconsciousness in the Universe


  8. Kate Knowles Kate Knowles says:

    Reading this book was very transformative for me You can transform in your own life if you pick a personal issue prima materia in your life, choose an artistic medium to work with, and take your art through the various alchemical processes Working with the material facilitates psychic transformation and openings in your life Having a support group to support you as you go through the process is recommended Alchemy is a beautiful tool and this book is brilliant You learn about and work wit Reading this book was very transformative for me You can transform in your own life if you pick a personal issue prima materia in your life, choose an artistic medium to work with, and take your art through the various alchemical processes Working with the material facilitates psychic transformation and openings in your life Having a support group to support you as you go through the process is recommended Alchemy is a beautiful tool and this book is brilliant You learn about and work with the earth elements, water, fire, earth, sky, death, birth, ect


  9. Kenzie Kenzie says:

    The subject matter is so vast that books on the subject of alchemy inevitably feel disorganized, but Edinger nonetheless supplies much to reflect on I had trouble with the section on Separatio, which seemed to endorse a dualism that doesn t really fit with how I experience mind body And as with many Jungian books, I felt like the psychology of women gets short shrift Besides these complaints, I really enjoyed how Edinger connected a variety of symbols to the development of the psyche I have The subject matter is so vast that books on the subject of alchemy inevitably feel disorganized, but Edinger nonetheless supplies much to reflect on I had trouble with the section on Separatio, which seemed to endorse a dualism that doesn t really fit with how I experience mind body And as with many Jungian books, I felt like the psychology of women gets short shrift Besides these complaints, I really enjoyed how Edinger connected a variety of symbols to the development of the psyche I have a lot of pages folded down


  10. Wctiii Wctiii says:

    Cracks away at alchemy from a Jungian perspective in a well organized way, not skipping over the basics and not quite dumming it down either.


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