Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and Wilderness (Lewis & Clark Expedition)

Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and



10 thoughts on “Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and Wilderness (Lewis & Clark Expedition)

  1. Jason Jason says:

    I was intrigued by the idea of this book and I think debunking some of the myths about L C and the expedition would be a great bookbut this is NOT it It is stale and pedantic and worse while there may be some good ideas and findings somewhere in this slim bookit is so hodgepodge and poorly put togetherit almost seems like random paragraphs slapped together to finish an overdue term paper I was intrigued by the idea of this book and I think debunking some of the myths about LC and the expedition would be a great bookbut this is NOT it It is stale and pedantic and worse while there may be some good ideas and findings somewhere in this slim bookit is so hodgepodge and poorly put togetherit almost seems like random paragraphs slapped together to finish an overdue term paper


  2. Greg Van Vorhis Greg Van Vorhis says:

    I got so lost and bored in the first 3 pages that I quickly lost interest I was supposed to be reading about Lewis and Clark, not myths and legends.


  3. Robert Ortiz Robert Ortiz says:

    Terrible read I am surprised that a professor of history at Notre Dame would write something as one sided as this Regret reading it and it has no place on my bookshelf


  4. A A says:

    Chapter 5 Porivo s Story controversy over Sacagawea s date of death, 1812 vs 1884


  5. Tom DeLoughrey Tom DeLoughrey says:

    I hate to not finish a book and this one tested me many times


  6. Don Don says:

    A fascinating, uncompromising look at the Journals of Lewis Clark It performs a perfect form tackle on an issue I have questioned for a long time the headlong rush by historians and educators to value primary sources to a fault.Let s face it, when somebody writes something down, even as a first person observer, they are viewing the event from their particular viewpoint, which includes their own interests, biases, perspectives, etc As a result, just as we would naturally take most autobi A fascinating, uncompromising look at the Journals of Lewis Clark It performs a perfect form tackle on an issue I have questioned for a long time the headlong rush by historians and educators to value primary sources to a fault.Let s face it, when somebody writes something down, even as a first person observer, they are viewing the event from their particular viewpoint, which includes their own interests, biases, perspectives, etc As a result, just as we would naturally take most autobiographies for what they are skewed in the direction that the writer subject would like other people to know or remember , we too should consider the journals of the Lewis Clark expedition And up to now, they have been given a free pass through the past 100 years of historical interpretation.I would submit that this close reading of the journals and should be considered authentic history rather than revisionist history, which I m sure lots of folks will tag it Notre Dame history profession Thomas Slaughter does a real service with this book not undermining Lewis Clark, but showing that they were human, with egos and shortcomings that are generally glossed over in most of the hundreds of books written about the Corps of Discovery


  7. Lauretta Lauretta says:

    Definitely a book to be read after reading Stephen Ambrose s Undaunted Courage.


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Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and Wilderness (Lewis & Clark Expedition) [BOOKS] ✮ Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and Wilderness (Lewis & Clark Expedition) ✸ Thomas P. Slaughter – Polishdarling.co.uk Most Americans know that Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led our nation s first trans continental exploratory expedition, which was sent west by President Thomas Jefferson in Their journey is one Most Americans and Clark: Epub à know that Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led our nation s first Exploring Lewis PDF/EPUB ² trans continental exploratory expedition, which was sent west by President Thomas Jefferson inTheir journey is Lewis and Clark: PDF/EPUB ê one of the most celebrated events in American history and one of the most written about But most of us do not know any than what the explorers told us, or what they wanted readers of their voluminous journals to know, or anything other than what they understood about themselves and their wilderness experiences Exploring Lewis and Clark probes beneath the traditional narrative of the journey, looking beyond the perspectives of the explorers themselves to those of the woman and the men who accompanied them, as well as of the Indians who met them along the way It reexamines the journals and what they suggest about Lewis s and Clark s misinterpretations of the worlds they passed through and the people in them Thomas Slaughter portrays Lewis and Clark not as heroes but as men brave, bound by cultural prejudices and blindly hell bent on achieving their goal He searches for the woman Sacajawea rather than the icon that she has become He seeks the historical rather than the legendary York, Clark s slave He discovers what the various tribes made of the expedition, including the notion that this multiracial, multiethnic group was embarked on a search for spiritual meaning Thomas Slaughter shines an entirely new light on an event basic to our understanding of ourselves He has given us an important work of investigative history.


10 thoughts on “Exploring Lewis and Clark: Reflections on Men and Wilderness (Lewis & Clark Expedition)

  1. Jason Jason says:

    I was intrigued by the idea of this book and I think debunking some of the myths about L C and the expedition would be a great bookbut this is NOT it It is stale and pedantic and worse while there may be some good ideas and findings somewhere in this slim bookit is so hodgepodge and poorly put togetherit almost seems like random paragraphs slapped together to finish an overdue term paper I was intrigued by the idea of this book and I think debunking some of the myths about LC and the expedition would be a great bookbut this is NOT it It is stale and pedantic and worse while there may be some good ideas and findings somewhere in this slim bookit is so hodgepodge and poorly put togetherit almost seems like random paragraphs slapped together to finish an overdue term paper


  2. Greg Van Vorhis Greg Van Vorhis says:

    I got so lost and bored in the first 3 pages that I quickly lost interest I was supposed to be reading about Lewis and Clark, not myths and legends.


  3. Robert Ortiz Robert Ortiz says:

    Terrible read I am surprised that a professor of history at Notre Dame would write something as one sided as this Regret reading it and it has no place on my bookshelf


  4. A A says:

    Chapter 5 Porivo s Story controversy over Sacagawea s date of death, 1812 vs 1884


  5. Tom DeLoughrey Tom DeLoughrey says:

    I hate to not finish a book and this one tested me many times


  6. Don Don says:

    A fascinating, uncompromising look at the Journals of Lewis Clark It performs a perfect form tackle on an issue I have questioned for a long time the headlong rush by historians and educators to value primary sources to a fault.Let s face it, when somebody writes something down, even as a first person observer, they are viewing the event from their particular viewpoint, which includes their own interests, biases, perspectives, etc As a result, just as we would naturally take most autobi A fascinating, uncompromising look at the Journals of Lewis Clark It performs a perfect form tackle on an issue I have questioned for a long time the headlong rush by historians and educators to value primary sources to a fault.Let s face it, when somebody writes something down, even as a first person observer, they are viewing the event from their particular viewpoint, which includes their own interests, biases, perspectives, etc As a result, just as we would naturally take most autobiographies for what they are skewed in the direction that the writer subject would like other people to know or remember , we too should consider the journals of the Lewis Clark expedition And up to now, they have been given a free pass through the past 100 years of historical interpretation.I would submit that this close reading of the journals and should be considered authentic history rather than revisionist history, which I m sure lots of folks will tag it Notre Dame history profession Thomas Slaughter does a real service with this book not undermining Lewis Clark, but showing that they were human, with egos and shortcomings that are generally glossed over in most of the hundreds of books written about the Corps of Discovery


  7. Lauretta Lauretta says:

    Definitely a book to be read after reading Stephen Ambrose s Undaunted Courage.


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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *