Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism



Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism How Do Modern Muslims Adapt Their Traditions To Engage With Today S World Charles Tripp S Erudite And Incisive Book Considers One Of The Most Significant Challenges Faced By Muslims Over The Last Sixty Years The Challenge Of Capitalism By Reference To The Works Of Noted Muslim Scholars, The Author Shows How, Faced By This Challenge, These Intellectuals Devised A Range Of Strategies Which Have Enabled Muslims To Remain True To Their Faith, Whilst Engaging Effectively With A World Not Of Their Own Making The Work Is Framed Around The Development Of Their Ideas On Islamic Socialism, Economics And The Rationale For Islamic Banking While Some Muslims Have Resorted To Confrontation Or Insularity To Cope With The Challenges Of Modernity, Most Have Aspired To Innovation And Ingenuity In The Search For Compromise And Interaction With Global Capitalism In The Twenty First Century

10 thoughts on “Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism

  1. says:

    How has the Islamic world responded to capitalism as a social and economic phenomenon of the modern world Is there any example of a contemporary Muslim country that is truly capitalist I dont think there is Turkey, for example, found out soon enough that merely adopting western armaments was not enough to stop the western encroachments, there had to be a cultural shift towards the west as well.The Mulsim leadership overlooked the fact that the copying specific Western developments like their How has the Islamic world responded to capitalism as a social and economic phenomenon of the modern world Is there any example of a contemporary Muslim country that is truly capitalist I dont think there is Turkey, for example, found out soon enough that merely adopting western armaments was not enough to stop the western encroachments, there had to be a cultural shift towards the west as well.The Mulsim leadership overlooked the fact that the copying specific Western developments like their economy and defense technology would come at a cost of the moral decay of traditional Islamic societal values They, therefore, should have invested in educating humanities, instead of only sciences This gap was filled and is still the case by morality movements like Wahabism and Salafism.The prevalence of zakat in the Islamic societies of today proves that Muslims have not accepted the norms of Western culture completely, why do we have to pay zakat when complying with our taxes in a social state like Britain for instance

  2. says:

    Tripp provides a very useful overview of mostly Arabic literature on the moral anxieties and legal debates produced by the intrusion of market capitalism into Muslim lands This is a complex question, as capitalism is seen by many Muslims both as an imposition by Westerners and a method of exploitation that have turned Muslims into victims, or into morally bankrupt co perpetrators Trying to moralize capitalism, rather than reject it, has been a difficult and not entirely successful endeavor, Tripp provides a very useful overview of mostly Arabic literature on the moral anxieties and legal debates produced by the intrusion of market capitalism into Muslim lands This is a complex question, as capitalism is seen by many Muslims both as an imposition by Westerners and a method of exploitation that have turned Muslims into victims, or into morally bankrupt co perpetrators Trying to moralize capitalism, rather than reject it, has been a difficult and not entirely successful endeavor, as Tripp makes clear

  3. says:

    It s a book that captures the development is the Islamic world of economics but is not restricted to economics This is important for the muslim as well as non muslim audience.

  4. says:

    More political economy of than economics, but in this case, there sto the political economy I like the sense of economic citizenship.

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