Changes in the Land



Changes in the Land The Book That Launched Environmental History Now Updated Winner Of The Francis Parkman PrizeIn This Landmark Work Of Environmental History, William Cronon Offers An Original And Profound Explanation Of The Effects European Colonists Sense Of Property And Their Pursuit Of Capitalism Had Upon The Ecosystems Of New England Reissued Here With An Updated Afterword By The Author And A New Preface By The Distinguished Colonialist John Demos, Changes In The Land, Provides A Brilliant Inter Disciplinary Interpretation Of How Land And People Influence One Another With Its Chilling Closing Line, The People Of Plenty Were A People Of Waste, Cronon S Enduring And Thought Provoking Book Is Ethno Ecological History At Its Best.

10 thoughts on “Changes in the Land

  1. says:

    How wonderfully enjoyable and informative this compact book turned out to be Though I m sure environmental history doesn t elicit much excitement from most people in general, I could see how most anyone could enjoy this book, at least anyone who has some curiosity as to the chain of events in nature in some fundamental ways or anyone who has an interest in the Indians versus the settlers ways with the land This book starts out describing the Native American Indians relationship with their e How wonderfully enjoyable and informative this compact book turned out to be Though I m sure environmental history doesn t elicit much excitement from most people in general, I could see how most anyone could enjoy this book, at least anyone who has some curiosity as to the chain of events in nature in some fundamental ways or anyone who has an interest in the Indians versus the settlers ways with the land This book starts out describing the Native Ame...

  2. says:

    Even though I live in San Diego, I found this book to be well worth the read Dense but short, Changes in the Land gives a close reading to the ecological impact of British colonization in New England As Cronon states in his conclusion, this transformation has ramifications far outside New England, since the environmental degradation that accompanied early colonization forced settlers farther and farther afield.Twenty years after it was published, the scholarship is still, what I would consid Even though I live in San Diego, I found this book to be well worth the read Dense but short, Changes in the Land gives a close reading to the ecologic...

  3. says:

    A very detailed description of every way Europeans ruined America.

  4. says:

    I used this text and compared to Crosby s Ecological Imperialism This text offers a different approach to environmental hsitroy, once that is muchhomo centric if you will Whereas Crosby discusses humans as being a small part of the bursting dam that is nature, Cronon argues that human beings are the chief agents of environmental change I personally side with Crosby on this one, and as a result, I like Cronon s work less But it is still a solid piece of writing in a field starving f I used this t...

  5. says:

    A brilliant book that contextualizes and links the environmental history of New England to larger historical forces of colonization, the transAtlantic trade, and global capitalistic economy Cronon persuasively and effectively argues ...

  6. says:

    Historian William Cronon was one of a group of scholars that pioneered a new and improved way of understanding the past Environmental history put the spotlight on many essential issues that were ignored by traditional history, and this made the sagas farpotent and illuminating.His book, Changes in the Land, is an environmental history of colonial New England It documents the clash of two cultures that could not have beendifferent, the Indians and the settlers It describes the hor...

  7. says:

    Let me preface this by saying that I think William Cronon is the most important ecological voice of our generation When environmental historians are piecing together the canon in one hundred years, it will go Muir, Leopold, Cronon with manysprinkled in between That being said, you can tell that this was born out of a doctoral thesis The writing isn t nearly as literary and compelling as it is in Nature s Metropolis That being said, I derived a tremendous amount of joy reading this in Let me preface this by saying that I think William Cronon is the most important ecological voice of our generation When environmental historians are piecing together the canon in one hundred years, it will go Muir, Leopold, Cronon with manysprinkled in between That being said, you can tell that this was born out of a doctoral thesis The writing isn t nearly as literary and compelling as it is in Nature s Metropolis That being said, I derived a tremendous amount of joy reading this in Sterling Library, humbly acknowledging that we all stand on the shoulders of giants.Changes in the Land rests on the idea that land in New England well before the industrial revolution became a form of capital for colonists that ...

  8. says:

    Cronon is a very clear writer His thesis is simple enough to be sustained but nuanced enough to be believable This is a seminal work in environmental history I will allow his preface to demonstrate My purpose throughout is to explain why New England habitats changed as they did during the colonial period It is not my intention to rewrite the human history of the region this is not a history of New England Indians, or of indian colonial relations, or of the transformation of English coloni Cronon is a very clear writer His thesis is simple enough to be sustained but nuanced enough to be believable This is a seminal work in environmental history I will allow his preface to demonstrate My purpose throughout is to explain why New England habitats changed as they did during the colonial period It is not my intention to rewrite the human history of the region this is not a history of New England Indians, or of indian colonial relations, or of the transformation of English colonists from Puritans to Yankees.Although I attribute much of the changing ecology of New England to the colonistsexclusive sense of property and their involvement in a capitalist economy both present to some extent from the 1620s onward I do not mean to suggest that the nature of the colonial e...

  9. says:

    An excellent and fascinating study My only quibbles would be 1 The book is somewhat dated while I m not an ecologist or biologist, I feel reasonably certain our scientific knowledge and ability to reconstruct past ecosystems has improved in the last thirty years It s time for a second, updated edition 2 The author to my mind struggles excessively not to portray the Native Americans as victims of European expansionism At several points he states explicitly that Native Americans were not s An excellent and fascinating study My only quibbles would be 1 The book is somewhat dated while I m not an ecologist or biologist, I feel reasonably certain our scientific knowledge and ability to reconstruct past ecosystems has improved in the last thirty years It s time for a second, updated edition 2 The author to my mind struggles excessively not to portray the Native Amer...

  10. says:

    5 26 2015 Upon re reading this book, I upped it to 5 stars My appreciation for Cronon s ingenuity has grown tremendously during the intervening years in which I first read it This work has held up incredibly well and I can see its footprint on a multitude of other historians, myself included It s a work I should re read every few years to remind myself to and how to thick creatively about sources and to ask the big questions of the sources I have.7 1 2008 Excellent academic read, but his 5 26 2015 Upon re reading this book, I upped it to 5 stars My appreciation for Cronon s ingenuity has grown tremendously during the intervening years in which I first read it ...

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