From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler



From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler After Reading This Book, I Guarantee That You Will Never Visit The Metropolitan Museum Of Art Or Any Wonderful, Old Cavern Of A Museum Without Sneaking Into The Bathrooms To Look For Claudia And Her Brother Jamie They Re Standing On The Toilets, Still, Hiding Until The Museum Closes And Their Adventure Begins Such Is The Impact Of Timeless Novels They Never Leave Us E L Konigsburg Won The 1967 Newbery Medal For This Tale Of How Claudia And Her Brother Run Away To The Museum In Order To Teach Their Parents A Lesson Little Do They Know That Mystery Awaits

10 thoughts on “From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

  1. says:

    OK, I ll admit it I freakin hate the Newbery Medal Any time I see it on the cover of a book, I m 98.5% sure it sucks All of the books that have been given this honor seem to have been written with the intent of teaching kids some crappy history lesson There s no magic or mystery to any of themreading these books is akin to eating dry toast when you know damned well you could cover the bread with butter, cinnamon, and sugar I mean, if you really want to martyr yourself, do it creatively, like St Agatha, who got her breasts cut off Otherwise, sit back, relax, and enjoy life, because nobody wants to hear your whining.I digress The point of this rant is that there is a major exception to my I Hate Newbery Rule, and it s this book The idea of two kids hiding out in The Metropolitan Museum of Art is so brilliant, it sends me running running ...

  2. says:

    From the mixed up files of Mrs Basil E Frankweiler, E.L Konigsburg Elaine Lobl Konigsburg was an American author and illustrator of children s books and young adult fiction Twelve year old Claudia Kincaid decides to run away from her home in suburban Connecticut, because she thinks her parents do not appreciate her and she doesn t ...

  3. says:

    I first read this book when I was 7 going on 8 I read it, and then I read it again Then I read it again, and kept going until, according to my personal mythology, I had read it 11 times And then I stole my school s copy of the book I hadn t picked it up for many years since then, but this book is woven into my neural pathways every which way, and rereading it still makes me love it The Mixed Up Files drew me in with its details and paraphernalia the instrument cases the transistor radio mac and cheese and baked beans , something I always loved about runaway and or survival stories It introduced me to New York City the New York of the 1960s the Automat and appealed to my love of museums and old things I also loved the tone I knew even then when I was being talked down to, but Konigsburg clearly respects her readers and expects them to be smart The framing and Mrs F s voice made the book feel adult And then it hit me in the gut with its fully developed characters and its non preachy life le...

  4. says:

    This was my son s first book he read entirely in English he is a rapid read of books in French already so I felt I needed to read it too What a pleasant surprise We both loved Jaime and Claudia and their adventures while running away and camping out in the Metropolitan Museum in NYC It is a touching book with lots of life lessons my favorite quote is Happiness is excitement that has found a settling place, but there is always a corner of i...

  5. says:

    My oldest grandson Philip is an avid reader, a trait my wife and I like to encourage He d encountered this Newbery award winner in his school library, and wanted to own a copy, so we gave him one for his 11th birthday last fall When he discovered that I d never read it it was first published in 1967, by which time I was in high school, and focusing my reading on grown up books , he wanted to share it with me, so he loaned me his copy Last year, he likewise introduced me to another kid s classic, Stone Fox I d heard of the book, but had no real clue what it was about.Elaine Konigsburg like some other women writers in the earlier decades of the past century, when the book trade was male dominated, she hid her gender behind her initials became an instant success in children s literature with this essentially debut novel It was technically the second one she had published, but both books were submitted at the same time That s a deserved tribute to her skill as a writer the craftsmanship of the book is of a pretty high order.As we learn from the outset through a short cover letter, the body of the book is supposedly a narrative composed by Mrs Basil E Frankweiler to her longtime and long suffering lawyer, Saxonburg, to explain a change she wants made to her will She s a childless 82 year old widow, as rich as Cr...

  6. says:

    99c Kindle sale, Oct 23, 2017 This short novel is a classic of middle grade fiction, and the 1968 Newbery Award winner Eleven year old Claudia decides to run away from home She was tired of arguing about whose turn it was to choose the Sunday night seven thirty television show, of injustice, and of the monotony of everything.You can tell this is set in an earlier time, before our media entertainment options multiplied Because her little brother Jamie is a lot better at saving money than she is, she invites him to run away with her And because she wants to run away to somewhere beautiful and elegant, she chooses to run away to the NYC Metropolitan Museum of Art They hide when the museum closes for the evening, and then have the place pretty much to themselves at night.But then Claudia and Jamie come upon a new MOMA acquisition a lovely angel statue donated by one Mrs Basil E Frankweiler Could it be a Michelangelo sculpture The art experts aren t sure And suddenly Claudia has found a mystery she deeply wants to solve, something that may alter her plans.It s a short, enjoyable MG story, and I ve had a paperback copy of it since I was a young teen It s survived a few rereads and bookshelf purges over the years, so this one was a keeper for me It really captures the thoughts and feelings of ...

  7. says:

    For his autumnal yet incandescent family tragicomedy, The Royal Tenenbaums, Wes Anderson drew inspiration from a handful of literary works remarkably possessed of whimsy and insightful wit Chief among these is the late J D Salinger s short but utterly perceptive book, Franny and Zooey, whose title characters are members of the Glass family, the basis for the dysfunctional Tenenbaums in Anderson s film The eccentric director, drawing further attention to his enchantment with Salinger s fictional family, even went so far as to pattern a quirk of one of the central characters in The Royal Tenenbaums after a scene in Franny and Zooey, where Zooey, the male protagonist, spends an inordinate stretch of time in a bathtub Anderson did the same, that is, cutting out a scene from a beloved book and stitching it into his film, to the 1968 Newbery Medal winning novel by E L Konigsburg, From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs Basil E Frankweiler In a brief episode of childhood rebellion in Anderson s film, two of the Tenenbaum siblings run away from home and live in, of all places, a museum They must have read Konigsburg s novel Anderson has, certainly for that s exactly what Claudia and Jamie Kincaid, the l...

  8. says:

    There are certain, special books that I don t want to give up once finished I guess to prolong the separation and perhaps to somehow physically absorb whatever magic it possesses, I ll find myself pressing my palms against the book, sandwiching it It doesn t happen very often But it did happen with this book.I had never read this book growing up But I m so glad that I finally got around to it.What is it that makes this book so wonderful Let s begin with Mrs Basil E Frankweiler s clever narration Her voice like the character is frosty and matter of fact but only on the surface There s also a warm undercurrent that shows the esteem she has for these kids and their adventure.Then add to that the relationship between Claudia and her brother Jamie It s terrific and so well done Like many siblings, their dynamic is a balancing act between affection and irritation, respect and disdain.And then you ve got the cool factor to the story Who hasn t thought about interacting, let alone living, with the artifacts in a museum The author clearly respects kids, a must if you want to create decent children s literature By allowing Claudia and Jamie to treat not only the Met but New York City as their home and playground and not get caught exemplifies Konigsburg s apparent belief in how capable and astute children can be.An...

  9. says:

    I think you should learn, of course, and some days you must learn a great deal But you should also have days when you allow what is already in you to swell up inside of you until it touches everything And you can feel it inside you If you never take time out to let that happen, then you just accumulate facts, and they begin to rattle around inside of you You can make noise with them, but never really feel anything with them It s hollow Here s a book that s lost none of its charm Siblings Claudia and Jamie run away together and live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a week, uncovering a Michelangelo related mystery and, along the way, learning a few things about family, grammar, and the joy of knowing secrets New York is a great city to hide out No one notices no one Like all the best children s books, its example is disgraceful The two children have only the dimmest sense of the panic they ve thrown their parents into they break into a museum repeatedly and they cheerfully throw backpacks into sarcophagi and sleep in historically valuable beds They also steal Children w...

  10. says:

    We expected to like this book a lot, on the whole we liked it, we found it well written and it kept us guessing what would happen.We enjoyed the start, the planning of running away was fun The idea of running away to a museum really appealed to us, when I was small I so wanted to spend a night in a museum and look around whilst it was dark and quiet, so I was really looking forward to this part We were both full of admiration ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *