A Victim of the Aurora



A Victim of the Aurora The Thrilling Story Of An Ill Fated Expedition To The South Pole By The Bestselling And Award Winning Author Of Schindler S List.In The Waning Years Of The Edwardian Era, A Group Of English Gentleman Adventurers Led By Sir Eugene Stewart Launched An Expedition To Reach The South Pole More Than Sixty Years Later, Anthony Piers, The Official Artist Of The New British South Polar Expedition, Finally Unveils The Sobering Conditions Of Their Perilous Journey Raging Wind, Bitter Cold, Fierce Hunger, Absolute Darkness And Murder The First Two Decades Of The Twentieth Century Were Known As The Heroic Era Of Antarctic Exploration In 1911, Roald Amundsen Reached The South Pole Weeks Later, Doomed British Explorer Robert Falcon Scott Arrived And Then Perished In A Blizzard And In 1914, Ernest Shackleton Embarked On His Infamous Voyage To Antarctica Set During This Epic Period Of Adventure And Discovery, Victim Of The Aurora Re Creates A Thrilling Time In An Unforgiving Place And Is A Brilliantly Plotted Tale Of Psychological Suspense.

  • Paperback
  • 188 pages
  • A Victim of the Aurora
  • Thomas Keneally
  • English
  • 18 November 2017
  • 0006153208

About the Author: Thomas Keneally

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the A Victim of the Aurora book, this is one of the most wanted Thomas Keneally author readers around the world.


10 thoughts on “A Victim of the Aurora

  1. says:

    I think listening to this as an audiobook was not ideal for this book in hindsight, I think reading it as a regular book and being able to flick back and forth would have beenbeneficial I also put it aside for 2 weeks when I went on holiday, which also didn t he...

  2. says:

    What is it about men and polar ice And what is it about those of us who never do anything sowell, pick your adjective, but read about it anyway Keneally s book details the story of an ill fated, perhaps, pole trip where there is a murder Imagine, the middle of nowhere, a small shack and some one is a killer.Unless that ghost isn t a ghost.This is far shorter and pre dates Simmons book The Terror It als is farof a character study and the struggle to come to terms not only with t What is it about me...

  3. says:

    Leaving aside any plot summary, the religious parallels in this novel are strong We have the all knowing trinity, made up of Sir Eugene Stewart, the leader of the expedition to Antarctica, Anthony Piers, the artist, and Alec Dryden, the man in charge of the scientific staff They are the only ones aware that the death of the accompanying journalist was murder, and agree to let the rest of the crew believe it was an accident while they investigate When the journal, revealing the sins of those on Leaving aside any plot summary, the religious parallels in this novel are strong We have the all knowing trinity, made up of Sir Eugene Stewart, the leader of the expedition to Antarctica, Anthony Piers, the artist, and Alec Dryden, the man in charge of the ...

  4. says:

    This was a good read, well written, and fairly accurate in its depictions of the Southern Continent The details of the plot, however, are a bit weak Good entertainment, though.

  5. says:

    This is a very interesting book, that reads just like a biography.

  6. says:

    Synopsis an ill fated expedition tries for the South Pole Sir Eugene Stewart and company Later we learn of bitter cold, hunger and murder.

  7. says:

    Victim of the Aurora is a fascinating novel set during an expedition to the South Pole, but not actually about the expedition itself as such The events chronicled by the narrator, Anthony Piers, demonstrate the undercurrents beneath the usual accounts of bravery and hardiness in such extreme circumstances The plot unfolds gradually but inexorably, involving from the very beginning Anthony is an interesting narrator, who regularly acknowledges his hindsight and second guesses himself The ot Victim of the Aurora is a fascinating novel set during an expedition to the South Pole, but not ac...

  8. says:

    Despite some difficulty withwell, just the s of Edwardian society, I really enjoyed this book a lot Keneally has created an Antarctic expedition that takes place in 1909, based on an amalgamation of the Scott, Shackleton and Mawson expeditions that took place around that time in real life It s a fairly satisfying murder mystery in that, while I didn t ultimately find the murderer a surprise, Keneally did manage to surprise me with the motive and the final outcome, and the red herrings a Despite some difficulty withwell, just the s of Edwardian society, I really enjoyed this book a lot Keneally has created an Antarctic expedition that takes place in 1909, based on an amalgamation of the Scott, Shackleton and Mawson expeditions that took place around that time in real life It s a fairly satisfying murder mystery in that, while I didn t ultimately find the murderer a surprise, Keneally did manage to surprise me with the motive and the final outcome, and the red herrings are actuallyreally interesting But what Keneally does exceptionally well here is to conjur up the claustrophobic atmosphere of an Antarctic winter the cold, the dark, and the horror of being trapped in such a place with a murderer, especially when the murderer must, most likely, be a member of your own small expedition And when you find out who it is, what do you do about it It s beau...

  9. says:

    I wish this book were twice as long as it is Keneally slows down the action at somewhat maddening points I liked the perspective of the aged former polar explorer quite a lot and wished there weredetails about his post Antarctica life I very much appreciated that Keneally pretty much skipped the journey to Antarctica, which would have taken ages by ship and would have been recorded in painstaking detail by a writer from the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration I am looking at you, Scott I wish this book were twice as long as it is Keneally slows down the action at somewhat maddening points I liked the perspective of the aged former polar explorer quite a lot and wished there weredetails about his post Antarctica life I very much appreciated that Keneally pretty much skipped the journey to Antarctica, which would have taken ages by ship and would have been recorded in painstaking detail by a writer from the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration I am looking at you, Scott, Shackleton, et al and is usually remarked upon at length even in contemporary Antarctic literature These people should take a cue...

  10. says:

    Just arrived from Australia through BM.This is the story of the new British South Polar expedition in 1910 when Captain Eugene Stewart is challenged to find the murder among his crew of Victor Henneker, an expedition journalist.The book is very well written and describes the rigors and loneliness of the Antarctic wastes.Among the narrative, two interesting books are mentioned by the author, such as The Sea Wolf by Jack London and Trilby by George du Maurier.Now I must read some book by Ernest S Just arrived from Australia through BM.This is the story of the new British South Polar expedition in 1910 when Captain Eugene Stewart is challenged to find the murder among his crew of Victor Henneker, an expedition journalist.The book is very well written and describes the rigors and loneliness of the Antarctic wastes.Among the narrative, two interesting books are mention...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *