A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber Planter in 1950s Malaya

A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber


A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber Planter in 1950s Malaya ➷ [Reading] ➹ A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber Planter in 1950s Malaya By John Dodd ➬ – Polishdarling.co.uk With true stories and confessions that would make even Somerset Maugham blush, John Dodd has penned a fascinating, and often hilarious, memoir of his life as a colonial rubber planter in s Malaya When With true stories and confessions that of Planters: ePUB ☆ would make even Somerset Maugham blush, John Dodd has penned a fascinating, and often hilarious, memoir of his life as a colonial rubber planter in s Malaya When not exploring the Chinese bars and brothels of Penang, there were A Company PDF or strikes, riots, snakes, plantation fires and deadly ambushes by Communist terrorists to contend with.


10 thoughts on “A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber Planter in 1950s Malaya

  1. Khairul Hezry Khairul Hezry says:

    A 21 year old Brit, fresh from working in Kenya applies for a job as a planter at a rubber estate in Malaya in 1956 After being asked just three simple questions at the interview, he finds himself on board a cruise ship bound for the Peninsula Thus begins four years of John Dodd s life as a managerial assistant at a Kedah rubber estate in pre Independence Malaya.It s not all work though He tells us of his forays into brothels in Penang which usually ends horribly wrong for him, looking out fo A 21 year old Brit, fresh from working in Kenya applies for a job as a planter at a rubber estate in Malaya in 1956 After being asked just three simple questions at the interview, he finds himself on board a cruise ship bound for the Peninsula Thus begins four years of John Dodd s life as a managerial assistant at a Kedah rubber estate in pre Independence Malaya.It s not all work though He tells us of his forays into brothels in Penang which usually ends horribly wrong for him, looking out for Communists ambushes, attending Malay weddings he hates the nasi minyak and trying to figure out whether he s house is haunted by a pontianak.A fun read though it could become tedious after reading page after page of his life on the plantation The best parts of the book is where Dodd discusses his British colleagues who were by and large were just as inexperienced as him and some were just plain incompetent He was surprised they held onto the land for this long with such poor quality management


  2. Laine Laine says:

    Just finished and enjoyed basically for its view on expat life, being an expat in SEAsia myself I laughed a lot at his colonial attitude and rejoiced as he slowly adapted to his new world While dated in the late 1950s, it still resonates.


  3. Johno Johno says:

    Quite an interesting view of 1950s Malaya from a Colonial perspective The book doesn t leave much to the imagination and at times the author doesn t come across as that likeable, but I think this is because the account is so honest, which in itself is commendable It was great to read about how little some things have changed I actually read some parts about the E O Hotel whilst staying there but how much other aspects have.I also quite liked the varying tones between the various letter recip Quite an interesting view of 1950s Malaya from a Colonial perspective The book doesn t leave much to the imagination and at times the author doesn t come across as that likeable, but I think this is because the account is so honest, which in itself is commendable It was great to read about how little some things have changed I actually read some parts about the EO Hotel whilst staying there but how much other aspects have.I also quite liked the varying tones between the various letter recipients and the diary, it was an interesting literary device for a while at least Worth a read if you re interested in Malaysia


  4. Jasmin Mohd-zain Jasmin Mohd-zain says:

    Ho Hum Quite a promising read going by the backcover blurb But every day is any day and any day is every day So it seem in the book.Maybe the writing format or the tone was a tad boring I read it for research abt ole Malaya.


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10 thoughts on “A Company of Planters: Confessions of a Colonial Rubber Planter in 1950s Malaya

  1. Khairul Hezry Khairul Hezry says:

    A 21 year old Brit, fresh from working in Kenya applies for a job as a planter at a rubber estate in Malaya in 1956 After being asked just three simple questions at the interview, he finds himself on board a cruise ship bound for the Peninsula Thus begins four years of John Dodd s life as a managerial assistant at a Kedah rubber estate in pre Independence Malaya.It s not all work though He tells us of his forays into brothels in Penang which usually ends horribly wrong for him, looking out fo A 21 year old Brit, fresh from working in Kenya applies for a job as a planter at a rubber estate in Malaya in 1956 After being asked just three simple questions at the interview, he finds himself on board a cruise ship bound for the Peninsula Thus begins four years of John Dodd s life as a managerial assistant at a Kedah rubber estate in pre Independence Malaya.It s not all work though He tells us of his forays into brothels in Penang which usually ends horribly wrong for him, looking out for Communists ambushes, attending Malay weddings he hates the nasi minyak and trying to figure out whether he s house is haunted by a pontianak.A fun read though it could become tedious after reading page after page of his life on the plantation The best parts of the book is where Dodd discusses his British colleagues who were by and large were just as inexperienced as him and some were just plain incompetent He was surprised they held onto the land for this long with such poor quality management


  2. Laine Laine says:

    Just finished and enjoyed basically for its view on expat life, being an expat in SEAsia myself I laughed a lot at his colonial attitude and rejoiced as he slowly adapted to his new world While dated in the late 1950s, it still resonates.


  3. Johno Johno says:

    Quite an interesting view of 1950s Malaya from a Colonial perspective The book doesn t leave much to the imagination and at times the author doesn t come across as that likeable, but I think this is because the account is so honest, which in itself is commendable It was great to read about how little some things have changed I actually read some parts about the E O Hotel whilst staying there but how much other aspects have.I also quite liked the varying tones between the various letter recip Quite an interesting view of 1950s Malaya from a Colonial perspective The book doesn t leave much to the imagination and at times the author doesn t come across as that likeable, but I think this is because the account is so honest, which in itself is commendable It was great to read about how little some things have changed I actually read some parts about the EO Hotel whilst staying there but how much other aspects have.I also quite liked the varying tones between the various letter recipients and the diary, it was an interesting literary device for a while at least Worth a read if you re interested in Malaysia


  4. Jasmin Mohd-zain Jasmin Mohd-zain says:

    Ho Hum Quite a promising read going by the backcover blurb But every day is any day and any day is every day So it seem in the book.Maybe the writing format or the tone was a tad boring I read it for research abt ole Malaya.


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