The King of Taksim Square

The King of Taksim Square PDF ↠ King of Taksim PDF

The King of Taksim Square [PDF] ✅ The King of Taksim Square By Emrah Serbes – Polishdarling.co.uk Seventeen year old a lar is just another apathetic teenager except when it comes to his sister, i dem, who he believes is the world s most beautiful and brilliant nine year old Determined to display h of Taksim PDF Í Seventeen year old a lar is just another apathetic teenager except when it comes The King eBook õ to his sister, i dem, who he believes is the world s most beautiful and King of Taksim PDF ☆ brilliant nine year old Determined to display her genius, a lar grooms i dem s talent into a perfect Michael Jackson impersonation and pursues a sure route to fame YouTubeTragically, a lar s efforts are sabotaged by a little incident internationally known as the Taksim riots Now it seems that everyone s too busy watching the people s uprising unfold to click on i dem s video That leaves a lar only one recourse he will have to use the riots to his advantage After all, who wouldn t want to watch a child doing the moonwalk against the backdrop of political unrest But as a lar strives to showcase his sister, he finds himself pulled into the heart of the uprising and discovers that he may just have talent of his ownFrom bestselling author Emrah Serbes comes a hilarious, poignant story of a teen s struggle to find his place and launch his sister s star amid Turkey s real life fight for freedom.


10 thoughts on “The King of Taksim Square

  1. Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈ Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈ says:

    Is it just me or does the cover look like Freddy Kruger


  2. Cortney Cortney says:

    Despite my love of Turkish food, I have a lack of familiarity with Turkish literature Perhaps that explains why I just could not get into or appreciate this book The narrator is an older boy although I spent most of the book trying to figure out how old he was, it turns out he s about seventeen , who believe his sister walks on water, his mother is a useless excuse for a human being, and his dad has abandoned him for political causes The characters in the narrator s life are universally bori Despite my love of Turkish food, I have a lack of familiarity with Turkish literature Perhaps that explains why I just could not get into or appreciate this book The narrator is an older boy although I spent most of the book trying to figure out how old he was, it turns out he s about seventeen , who believe his sister walks on water, his mother is a useless excuse for a human being, and his dad has abandoned him for political causes The characters in the narrator s life are universally boring, self centered, and slimy creatures, with a vocabulary filled with curses and insults I wanted to like this book, but I couldn t Even though I understand why a nine year old might wondering why the Turkish protests of 2013 could so unfairly interfere with her efforts to win youtube fame, it wasn t enough to hold me


  3. Zoe& Zoe& says:

    The author has managed to perfectly capture the voice of an arrogant 17 year old boy You know there s a reason I don t have children DNFed 55 pages in I just can t do this I loathe the main character Even his one redeeming characteristic of loving his sister borders on the psychopathic and creepy I received a complimentary copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.


  4. Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits) Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits) says:

    I received a copy of The King Of Taksim Square by Emrah Serbes from its publishers,Crossing, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.While reading The King Of Taksim Square, Serbes protagonist, seventeen year old Caglar, reminded me a lot of Holden Caulfield because of the style of his direct narration and its stream of consciousness energy Interestingly I struggled to finish Catcher In The Rye but enjoyed this book farCaglar is a bigshot in his small town, mainly becaus I received a copy of The King Of Taksim Square by Emrah Serbes from its publishers,Crossing, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.While reading The King Of Taksim Square, Serbes protagonist, seventeen year old Caglar, reminded me a lot of Holden Caulfield because of the style of his direct narration and its stream of consciousness energy Interestingly I struggled to finish Catcher In The Rye but enjoyed this book farCaglar is a bigshot in his small town, mainly because his Uncle is the corrupt Mayor Caglar expects his name alone to open doors and gain favours, but this world view begins to be challenged when his beloved younger sister, Cigdem, enters a talent competition dancing as Michael Jackson Cigdem is everything to Caglar and he cannot believe that the TV company fails to see how amazing she is Attempting to promote Cigdem by social media channels instead, Caglar posts her dance on YouTube where it has modest success until an Istanbul protest steals her thunder.It did take me a while to get into this book and I have since read of other reviewers abandoning it early on The initial meandering style does tighten up and, as we learn who everyone is, there are fewer diversions into back stories However Caglar s short attention span remains and I enjoyed his focus changes, especially once he gets to Istanbul and the epicentre of its protest and riots The King Of Taksim Square has a strong nostalgic thread running throughout which is nicely contrasted with modern technological and social elements Caglar is constantly hankering for the past sometimes specifically to his experience such as the now vanished site of his first kiss or as ageneral longing for the way Turkey used to be He wants the latest iPhone, but insists on referring to shops and cafes with the names of businesses that preceded them.The scenes of the protest themselves are exciting but baffling, much as they must have really been to many people there at the time, and Caglar sees most of the action in relation to himself, not as part of the wider picture This is in keeping with his character although I did have to read up about the politics of it all after finishing the novel I thought The King Of Taksim Square was an engaging read that gave an unusual insight into Turkish life.Seeof my book reviews on my blog, Stephanie Jane


  5. Janet Flora Corso Janet Flora Corso says:

    I was hooked by the MC s unique voice right away a lar yice has an interesting perspective of life and translates his views into often hilarious, sometimes biting, commentary telling his small story against the backdrop of the larger, historical events in Turkey in the Spring of 2013 I am sure I am not the only person to call him the Turkish Holden Caulfield, but that is the comparison that kept running through my mind.I remember watching the events unfolding online, especially Twitter, so I I was hooked by the MC s unique voice right away a lar yice has an interesting perspective of life and translates his views into often hilarious, sometimes biting, commentary telling his small story against the backdrop of the larger, historical events in Turkey in the Spring of 2013 I am sure I am not the only person to call him the Turkish Holden Caulfield, but that is the comparison that kept running through my mind.I remember watching the events unfolding online, especially Twitter, so I loved how a lar talks about the reality of social media and how he uses it as his own outlet He does not hold back opinions or caustic thoughts about anything, from media to government to his family, and some of his observations, and therefore the author s social commentaries, are so on target, I found myself rereading passages just to soak in some of the profundity I don t know anything about the book s reception in Turkey, but I like to think of it being passed around by young readers for generations as their tale, the one that makes them think about their own place in the larger world.Do not think that he is only an angry teen trying to tear down corruption, though At the heart of his story, a lar yice is just a brother who wants to make his little sister happy He has his own struggles, especially within their family, but as he tells us many times, he only cares for her and helping fulfill her dream of dancing like Michael Jackson on TV and eventually YouTube.This story is just being introduced to English reading audiences and I hope some of our disenchanted and or curious teens also embrace it I did learnabout the Taksim Square occupation as well as the teen culture of Turkey One thing our society needs isawareness of others Andvoices like a lar yice s


  6. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    This is a bit like a Turkish Catcher in the Rye The main character is a teenage boy in a small town in Turkey His 9 year old sister is about to enter a talent show as a Michael Jackson impersonator, his father left the family a few years prior, and the protests in Istanbul in Taksim Square are about to begin Lots of humorous passages, and I enjoyed the satire That said, I wanted to like the bookthan I ultimately did It needs a good editing, particularly once the setting shifts to Ta This is a bit like a Turkish Catcher in the Rye The main character is a teenage boy in a small town in Turkey His 9 year old sister is about to enter a talent show as a Michael Jackson impersonator, his father left the family a few years prior, and the protests in Istanbul in Taksim Square are about to begin Lots of humorous passages, and I enjoyed the satire That said, I wanted to like the bookthan I ultimately did It needs a good editing, particularly once the setting shifts to Taksim Square during the protests Too many digressions into the boy s rants on different subjects, and a complete lack of focus in the final twenty percent of the book.Recommended for those who are tired of reading the same thing and want to break out of rut


  7. Lynette Lynette says:

    I am about 60 pages in I have no idea what is going on or why I should care I am moving on with life This is a weird book I think there may be some cultural things that are not translating well.


  8. Brian Cubbage Brian Cubbage says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This is a strange book Our story follows the exploits of aglar Iyice, a seventeen year old in Turkey at the time of the Taksim Square uprising in 2012 He narrates his efforts to make his nine year old sister, igdem, a Michael Jackson tribute artist, famous, first by trying to get her on an Idol type television talent competition, then by trying to make her a viral YouTube star The plan is complicated, however, by the untimely breakout of the Taksim Square uprising, which comes to flood soci This is a strange book Our story follows the exploits of aglar Iyice, a seventeen year old in Turkey at the time of the Taksim Square uprising in 2012 He narrates his efforts to make his nine year old sister, igdem, a Michael Jackson tribute artist, famous, first by trying to get her on an Idol type television talent competition, then by trying to make her a viral YouTube star The plan is complicated, however, by the untimely breakout of the Taksim Square uprising, which comes to flood social media and, ultimately, the lives of the characters The events in the book, however, are merely the setting for a deeper set of struggles The events of the book are filtered through his flamboyant, self centered, somewhat unreliable awareness aglar has assigned himself the task of running his family, and he is doing about as well as a seventeen year old boy might His mother has poorly managed depression his distant, estranged father, a leftist architect, turns out to have a role in the Taksim uprising His uncle, the corrupt mayor of Kiyidere, their seaside village, is a party jumping opportunist who never met a municipal construction project he didn t like His loyal best friend, Microbe Cengiz, is by a wide margin the most together person in the book, and even he is cracking due to having to take care of his dying father, poisoned by his years of work at the Pirelli tire plant aglar is stretched thin, trusts no one, makes consistently bad decisions, and manages to alienate just about everyone over the course of the book His saving grace is that he seems to be taking on the world to save his sister from a society which, from his point of view, is too strained to allow for genuine human relationships.The narrative matches aglar s character well, hurtling from event to event, confrontation to confrontation, like a car out of control His relationship to the politics of the Taksim uprising is tangential at best He profits considerably from his connections with his conservative uncle, the mayor, even as he detests everything he stands for, and he sees the uprising merely as a platform for getting exposure for his sister He ultimately joins half heartedly in the protests because they at least afford him an outlet for his anomie The book doesn t read like an attempt to capture the aims and goals of the uprising aglar is, as the kids say, a hot mess, and the uprising is just the backdrop for his crumbling personal relationships and his stunning lack of self awareness The book ends with him finally, just barely, coming to terms with the fact that he doesn t understand himself or the events unfolding around him I didn t enjoy this book, but something about it compelled me to finish it I doubt I am either the intended or expected audience for this book, the first of Serbes s novels to be translated into English No doubt there is a great deal of subtext that is lost on me, a leftish middle class American It left me feeling like there is a great deal about contemporary Turkey, itself torn between Europe and the Middle East, that I simply don t understand


  9. Traci Failla Traci Failla says:

    In The King of Taksim Square we get a view of the young man on the verge of adulthood, possessing both the wisdom and ignorance that only an analytical 17 year old can Much like Holden Caulfield of The Catcher in the Rye or even John Bender of The Breakfast Club , the main character, Caglar, thinks that he has life figured out but is regretful that it is as blemished as it is.Caglar has a lot to process on a daily basis a mother who is overwhelmed by life, an uncle who plays the role of the In The King of Taksim Square we get a view of the young man on the verge of adulthood, possessing both the wisdom and ignorance that only an analytical 17 year old can Much like Holden Caulfield of The Catcher in the Rye or even John Bender of The Breakfast Club , the main character, Caglar, thinks that he has life figured out but is regretful that it is as blemished as it is.Caglar has a lot to process on a daily basis a mother who is overwhelmed by life, an uncle who plays the role of the family and town patriarch for better and for worse, an absent father whom he hasn t forgiven, an ex girlfriend who doesn t share his feelings of affection The bright points in his life are his friend Microbe and his sister, whom he adores, a budding Michael Jackson impersonator on the verge of stardom at least in their minds.Caglar s day to day troubles, the greatest of which is helping his sister achieve fame, escalate when protests break out in his town and the larger Istanbul This is when we see Caglar both struggle and evolve, the depth of his character develop.One of the best parts of this book is the voice Told in the first person, the author did a great job of keeping us very close to Caglar s point of view It s this closeness that helps us discover that Caglar can be an unreliable narrator, adding complexity to the story.Set it Turkey and written by a Turkish author, the translation seemed to be very well done There were a few instances where some cultural aspects weren t entirely clear, but these were minimal and not a distraction to the story In fact, another thing that is appealing about the book is witnessing how similar this type of character is from culture to culture.It did take a while to get into the main action of the story Quite a bit of time was devoted to giving us a picture of Caglar s life and worldview The character s voice kept this entertaining for me, but I can see where other readers might have felt it drag


  10. Zoriana Z Zoriana Z says:

    Why I picked it upThis was offered as a Kindle First and I thought the premise sounded interesting On a recent trip to Ukraine, I got the chance to visit the Maidan square in Kyiv, where a recent uprising took place, and while there I thought to myself, it would be interesting to read a novel set within a revolution like this, but not too politicized, just something with some characters trying to get along in such an environment So when I saw The King of Taksim square I thought hey, someone ac Why I picked it upThis was offered as a Kindle First and I thought the premise sounded interesting On a recent trip to Ukraine, I got the chance to visit the Maidan square in Kyiv, where a recent uprising took place, and while there I thought to myself, it would be interesting to read a novel set within a revolution like this, but not too politicized, just something with some characters trying to get along in such an environment So when I saw The King of Taksim square I thought hey, someone actually wrote something that I thought of YayStory is based in the Arab Spring, with a young teen trying to help his sister get famous to boost her self esteem If you take out the random rants, the negative ways Caglar treats his mother, and his creepy obsessions with his sister, some parts of the novel are decent and enjoyable, a satire on modern culture, how we idolize people we love, and how everyone wants their 15 minutes of fame Gives a great glimpse into life in Turkey as well as the personable desire to want somethingin life than what we are given Also appreciated the father son moments.NayEverything as stated above pages of random rants, his weird behavior towards his mother and other women in the story, no real explanation on why he hates his uncle so much, and jeez, Caglar, stop touching your sister when she s sleeping At the end, the novel just kind of ends in a strange meandering way At this point I would ve preferred even a cliche ending of his sister actually becoming a Youtube star It was a frustrating read because I feel like the story had so much potential, and it almost reached it at some parts, but there was too much dragging it down at the end


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10 thoughts on “The King of Taksim Square

  1. Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈ Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈ says:

    Is it just me or does the cover look like Freddy Kruger


  2. Cortney Cortney says:

    Despite my love of Turkish food, I have a lack of familiarity with Turkish literature Perhaps that explains why I just could not get into or appreciate this book The narrator is an older boy although I spent most of the book trying to figure out how old he was, it turns out he s about seventeen , who believe his sister walks on water, his mother is a useless excuse for a human being, and his dad has abandoned him for political causes The characters in the narrator s life are universally bori Despite my love of Turkish food, I have a lack of familiarity with Turkish literature Perhaps that explains why I just could not get into or appreciate this book The narrator is an older boy although I spent most of the book trying to figure out how old he was, it turns out he s about seventeen , who believe his sister walks on water, his mother is a useless excuse for a human being, and his dad has abandoned him for political causes The characters in the narrator s life are universally boring, self centered, and slimy creatures, with a vocabulary filled with curses and insults I wanted to like this book, but I couldn t Even though I understand why a nine year old might wondering why the Turkish protests of 2013 could so unfairly interfere with her efforts to win youtube fame, it wasn t enough to hold me


  3. Zoe& Zoe& says:

    The author has managed to perfectly capture the voice of an arrogant 17 year old boy You know there s a reason I don t have children DNFed 55 pages in I just can t do this I loathe the main character Even his one redeeming characteristic of loving his sister borders on the psychopathic and creepy I received a complimentary copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.


  4. Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits) Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits) says:

    I received a copy of The King Of Taksim Square by Emrah Serbes from its publishers,Crossing, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.While reading The King Of Taksim Square, Serbes protagonist, seventeen year old Caglar, reminded me a lot of Holden Caulfield because of the style of his direct narration and its stream of consciousness energy Interestingly I struggled to finish Catcher In The Rye but enjoyed this book farCaglar is a bigshot in his small town, mainly becaus I received a copy of The King Of Taksim Square by Emrah Serbes from its publishers,Crossing, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.While reading The King Of Taksim Square, Serbes protagonist, seventeen year old Caglar, reminded me a lot of Holden Caulfield because of the style of his direct narration and its stream of consciousness energy Interestingly I struggled to finish Catcher In The Rye but enjoyed this book farCaglar is a bigshot in his small town, mainly because his Uncle is the corrupt Mayor Caglar expects his name alone to open doors and gain favours, but this world view begins to be challenged when his beloved younger sister, Cigdem, enters a talent competition dancing as Michael Jackson Cigdem is everything to Caglar and he cannot believe that the TV company fails to see how amazing she is Attempting to promote Cigdem by social media channels instead, Caglar posts her dance on YouTube where it has modest success until an Istanbul protest steals her thunder.It did take me a while to get into this book and I have since read of other reviewers abandoning it early on The initial meandering style does tighten up and, as we learn who everyone is, there are fewer diversions into back stories However Caglar s short attention span remains and I enjoyed his focus changes, especially once he gets to Istanbul and the epicentre of its protest and riots The King Of Taksim Square has a strong nostalgic thread running throughout which is nicely contrasted with modern technological and social elements Caglar is constantly hankering for the past sometimes specifically to his experience such as the now vanished site of his first kiss or as ageneral longing for the way Turkey used to be He wants the latest iPhone, but insists on referring to shops and cafes with the names of businesses that preceded them.The scenes of the protest themselves are exciting but baffling, much as they must have really been to many people there at the time, and Caglar sees most of the action in relation to himself, not as part of the wider picture This is in keeping with his character although I did have to read up about the politics of it all after finishing the novel I thought The King Of Taksim Square was an engaging read that gave an unusual insight into Turkish life.Seeof my book reviews on my blog, Stephanie Jane


  5. Janet Flora Corso Janet Flora Corso says:

    I was hooked by the MC s unique voice right away a lar yice has an interesting perspective of life and translates his views into often hilarious, sometimes biting, commentary telling his small story against the backdrop of the larger, historical events in Turkey in the Spring of 2013 I am sure I am not the only person to call him the Turkish Holden Caulfield, but that is the comparison that kept running through my mind.I remember watching the events unfolding online, especially Twitter, so I I was hooked by the MC s unique voice right away a lar yice has an interesting perspective of life and translates his views into often hilarious, sometimes biting, commentary telling his small story against the backdrop of the larger, historical events in Turkey in the Spring of 2013 I am sure I am not the only person to call him the Turkish Holden Caulfield, but that is the comparison that kept running through my mind.I remember watching the events unfolding online, especially Twitter, so I loved how a lar talks about the reality of social media and how he uses it as his own outlet He does not hold back opinions or caustic thoughts about anything, from media to government to his family, and some of his observations, and therefore the author s social commentaries, are so on target, I found myself rereading passages just to soak in some of the profundity I don t know anything about the book s reception in Turkey, but I like to think of it being passed around by young readers for generations as their tale, the one that makes them think about their own place in the larger world.Do not think that he is only an angry teen trying to tear down corruption, though At the heart of his story, a lar yice is just a brother who wants to make his little sister happy He has his own struggles, especially within their family, but as he tells us many times, he only cares for her and helping fulfill her dream of dancing like Michael Jackson on TV and eventually YouTube.This story is just being introduced to English reading audiences and I hope some of our disenchanted and or curious teens also embrace it I did learnabout the Taksim Square occupation as well as the teen culture of Turkey One thing our society needs isawareness of others Andvoices like a lar yice s


  6. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    This is a bit like a Turkish Catcher in the Rye The main character is a teenage boy in a small town in Turkey His 9 year old sister is about to enter a talent show as a Michael Jackson impersonator, his father left the family a few years prior, and the protests in Istanbul in Taksim Square are about to begin Lots of humorous passages, and I enjoyed the satire That said, I wanted to like the bookthan I ultimately did It needs a good editing, particularly once the setting shifts to Ta This is a bit like a Turkish Catcher in the Rye The main character is a teenage boy in a small town in Turkey His 9 year old sister is about to enter a talent show as a Michael Jackson impersonator, his father left the family a few years prior, and the protests in Istanbul in Taksim Square are about to begin Lots of humorous passages, and I enjoyed the satire That said, I wanted to like the bookthan I ultimately did It needs a good editing, particularly once the setting shifts to Taksim Square during the protests Too many digressions into the boy s rants on different subjects, and a complete lack of focus in the final twenty percent of the book.Recommended for those who are tired of reading the same thing and want to break out of rut


  7. Lynette Lynette says:

    I am about 60 pages in I have no idea what is going on or why I should care I am moving on with life This is a weird book I think there may be some cultural things that are not translating well.


  8. Brian Cubbage Brian Cubbage says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This is a strange book Our story follows the exploits of aglar Iyice, a seventeen year old in Turkey at the time of the Taksim Square uprising in 2012 He narrates his efforts to make his nine year old sister, igdem, a Michael Jackson tribute artist, famous, first by trying to get her on an Idol type television talent competition, then by trying to make her a viral YouTube star The plan is complicated, however, by the untimely breakout of the Taksim Square uprising, which comes to flood soci This is a strange book Our story follows the exploits of aglar Iyice, a seventeen year old in Turkey at the time of the Taksim Square uprising in 2012 He narrates his efforts to make his nine year old sister, igdem, a Michael Jackson tribute artist, famous, first by trying to get her on an Idol type television talent competition, then by trying to make her a viral YouTube star The plan is complicated, however, by the untimely breakout of the Taksim Square uprising, which comes to flood social media and, ultimately, the lives of the characters The events in the book, however, are merely the setting for a deeper set of struggles The events of the book are filtered through his flamboyant, self centered, somewhat unreliable awareness aglar has assigned himself the task of running his family, and he is doing about as well as a seventeen year old boy might His mother has poorly managed depression his distant, estranged father, a leftist architect, turns out to have a role in the Taksim uprising His uncle, the corrupt mayor of Kiyidere, their seaside village, is a party jumping opportunist who never met a municipal construction project he didn t like His loyal best friend, Microbe Cengiz, is by a wide margin the most together person in the book, and even he is cracking due to having to take care of his dying father, poisoned by his years of work at the Pirelli tire plant aglar is stretched thin, trusts no one, makes consistently bad decisions, and manages to alienate just about everyone over the course of the book His saving grace is that he seems to be taking on the world to save his sister from a society which, from his point of view, is too strained to allow for genuine human relationships.The narrative matches aglar s character well, hurtling from event to event, confrontation to confrontation, like a car out of control His relationship to the politics of the Taksim uprising is tangential at best He profits considerably from his connections with his conservative uncle, the mayor, even as he detests everything he stands for, and he sees the uprising merely as a platform for getting exposure for his sister He ultimately joins half heartedly in the protests because they at least afford him an outlet for his anomie The book doesn t read like an attempt to capture the aims and goals of the uprising aglar is, as the kids say, a hot mess, and the uprising is just the backdrop for his crumbling personal relationships and his stunning lack of self awareness The book ends with him finally, just barely, coming to terms with the fact that he doesn t understand himself or the events unfolding around him I didn t enjoy this book, but something about it compelled me to finish it I doubt I am either the intended or expected audience for this book, the first of Serbes s novels to be translated into English No doubt there is a great deal of subtext that is lost on me, a leftish middle class American It left me feeling like there is a great deal about contemporary Turkey, itself torn between Europe and the Middle East, that I simply don t understand


  9. Traci Failla Traci Failla says:

    In The King of Taksim Square we get a view of the young man on the verge of adulthood, possessing both the wisdom and ignorance that only an analytical 17 year old can Much like Holden Caulfield of The Catcher in the Rye or even John Bender of The Breakfast Club , the main character, Caglar, thinks that he has life figured out but is regretful that it is as blemished as it is.Caglar has a lot to process on a daily basis a mother who is overwhelmed by life, an uncle who plays the role of the In The King of Taksim Square we get a view of the young man on the verge of adulthood, possessing both the wisdom and ignorance that only an analytical 17 year old can Much like Holden Caulfield of The Catcher in the Rye or even John Bender of The Breakfast Club , the main character, Caglar, thinks that he has life figured out but is regretful that it is as blemished as it is.Caglar has a lot to process on a daily basis a mother who is overwhelmed by life, an uncle who plays the role of the family and town patriarch for better and for worse, an absent father whom he hasn t forgiven, an ex girlfriend who doesn t share his feelings of affection The bright points in his life are his friend Microbe and his sister, whom he adores, a budding Michael Jackson impersonator on the verge of stardom at least in their minds.Caglar s day to day troubles, the greatest of which is helping his sister achieve fame, escalate when protests break out in his town and the larger Istanbul This is when we see Caglar both struggle and evolve, the depth of his character develop.One of the best parts of this book is the voice Told in the first person, the author did a great job of keeping us very close to Caglar s point of view It s this closeness that helps us discover that Caglar can be an unreliable narrator, adding complexity to the story.Set it Turkey and written by a Turkish author, the translation seemed to be very well done There were a few instances where some cultural aspects weren t entirely clear, but these were minimal and not a distraction to the story In fact, another thing that is appealing about the book is witnessing how similar this type of character is from culture to culture.It did take a while to get into the main action of the story Quite a bit of time was devoted to giving us a picture of Caglar s life and worldview The character s voice kept this entertaining for me, but I can see where other readers might have felt it drag


  10. Zoriana Z Zoriana Z says:

    Why I picked it upThis was offered as a Kindle First and I thought the premise sounded interesting On a recent trip to Ukraine, I got the chance to visit the Maidan square in Kyiv, where a recent uprising took place, and while there I thought to myself, it would be interesting to read a novel set within a revolution like this, but not too politicized, just something with some characters trying to get along in such an environment So when I saw The King of Taksim square I thought hey, someone ac Why I picked it upThis was offered as a Kindle First and I thought the premise sounded interesting On a recent trip to Ukraine, I got the chance to visit the Maidan square in Kyiv, where a recent uprising took place, and while there I thought to myself, it would be interesting to read a novel set within a revolution like this, but not too politicized, just something with some characters trying to get along in such an environment So when I saw The King of Taksim square I thought hey, someone actually wrote something that I thought of YayStory is based in the Arab Spring, with a young teen trying to help his sister get famous to boost her self esteem If you take out the random rants, the negative ways Caglar treats his mother, and his creepy obsessions with his sister, some parts of the novel are decent and enjoyable, a satire on modern culture, how we idolize people we love, and how everyone wants their 15 minutes of fame Gives a great glimpse into life in Turkey as well as the personable desire to want somethingin life than what we are given Also appreciated the father son moments.NayEverything as stated above pages of random rants, his weird behavior towards his mother and other women in the story, no real explanation on why he hates his uncle so much, and jeez, Caglar, stop touching your sister when she s sleeping At the end, the novel just kind of ends in a strange meandering way At this point I would ve preferred even a cliche ending of his sister actually becoming a Youtube star It was a frustrating read because I feel like the story had so much potential, and it almost reached it at some parts, but there was too much dragging it down at the end


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