Homegoing



Homegoing Effia And Esi Two Sisters With Two Very Different Destinies One Sold Into Slavery One A Slave Trader S Wife The Consequences Of Their Fate Reverberate Through The Generations That Follow Taking Us From The Gold Coast Of Africa To The Cotton Picking Plantations Of Mississippi From The Missionary Schools Of Ghana To The Dive Bars Of Harlem, Spanning Three Continents And Seven Generations, Yaa Gyasi Has Written A Miraculous Novel The Intimate, Gripping Story Of A Brilliantly Vivid Cast Of Characters And Through Their Lives The Very Story Of America Itself.Epic In Its Canvas And Intimate In Its Portraits, Homegoing Is A Searing And Profound Debut From A Masterly New Writer.

10 thoughts on “Homegoing

  1. says:

    What I know now, my son Evil begets evil It grows It transmutes, so that sometimes you cannot see that the evil in the world began as the evil in your own home 4 1 2 stars Homegoing is an incredible and horrific look at history, colonialism and slavery in Ghana and America, across 250 years How the author managed to create such rich characters, cover so much history, and tell such a complex, but compelling story in only 300 pages, I do not know.I recently said in my review of East of Eden that I love family sagas Those epic tales spanning generations and pulling you into the lives of so many interesting characters yeah, they are some of my favourite kind of stories Spending so long with the same family, watching them grow through the years and seeing their children face their own problems it just feels so personal I feel like I ve grown with them.This book, however, is possibly the most ambitious family saga I have ever read Most books like this feature three generations Homegoing follows seven generations, fourteen perspectives in total It all begins with two half sisters Effia and Esi who will never know each other One s experience...

  2. says:

    Homegoing is a very confident debut novel Exceptionally engaging and the strongest case for reparations and black rage I ve read in a long time Seriously, white men are the devil The most interesting part of this novel, the structure, also becomes the most frustrating part of the novel The story starts with two sisters who are never allowed to know each other, and what becomes of the generations they beget, starting in 18th century Ghana The novel beautifully explores the slave trade and imagines life in Ghana at that time, and as we move forward through time, from one generation to the next, we see what slavery becomes in the US, and how it changes Ghana The early chapters are rich and immersive and I could not put the book down I am impressed by the magnitude of the novel s ambition and how much research went into feeling like the author had, herself, seen African in the 18th century or the American South in the 19th century or Harlem in the 20th century The closer we get to present day, the the chapters feel like they are designed, not so much as fictional narratives, but rather as vignettes meant to reveal specific historical moments and sociopolitical ideas the civil wa...

  3. says:

    I give 5 shining stars to Yaa Gyasi s Homegoing, the best debut novel I have read this year In this semi autobiographical tale, Gyasi follows the family histories of two half sisters, Effia the beauty and Esi to reveal how their families end up Each chapter is a vignette focusing on a family member in subsequent generations, alternating between Effia and Esi s families until we reach present day Here are their until now largely untold stories Effia the beauty had been raised by her step mother Baaba who did not love her as her own Saved from a fire that plays a prominent role in her family s history for generations to come, Effia becomes the village s beauty long before she reaches marriageable age Baaba, who always resented Effia s presence, sells her to the British in order to ensure the Asante s place in the slave trade, and Effia marries an English governor rather than a tribal chief The only memory she takes with her is a black stone polished by fire One village over from Effia s, Esi Asare becomes a spoil of a tribal war In a subsequent war, she is enslaved and taken to the same Cape Coastal Castle where Effia lives as the governor s wife Before becoming captive, Esi receives a black stone from her mother Maame and finds out that she is not her mother s first born, rather that she had another daughter who sh...

  4. says:

    Read for Book Riot s 2017 Read Harder reading challenge 24 Read a book wherein all point of view characters are people of colorThe premise for this book is amazing Two sisters are separated at birth, and each alternating chapter follows a descendant of each sister Great, right My biggest issue was that this felt like a collection of short stories than a novel There s nothing wrong with that necessarily, but it just wasn t my cup of tea When I read a novel, I want to feel connected to the characters and their stories, but with this book I feel like I never got to know the characters, like I only saw their surfaces As an entire book,...

  5. says:

    Stunned, just absolutely stunned that this is a d but novel Spanning centuries and continents, the novel follows two families, one from the slave trading Fante nation and another from the Asante warrior nation, in the British colony that is now Ghana Stepsisters, who are unaware of each others existence, one will marry a white man, a British official who lives in the upper part of the Cape Coast Castle The other, in the lower dungeons of the same castle and sold as a slave, transported to the American South Any book about slavery is going to be hard to read and this book is no exception In alternating chapters, we go from Africa, to the south, and follow the descendants of the two women We see what happens in Africa, the effects of the British Colonization and internal warfare The South, slavery and then quasi freedom but under Jim Crow laws South Carolina and its eugenic provram.Rather than reading as a novel it is almost like portraits, snapshots of the lingering effects of slavery Characters change often, each chapter narrated by another though some overlap, this took some getting used to but each character was important, each character I took to ...

  6. says:

    congratulations semifinalist in goodreads best historical fiction category 2016 We believe the one who has the power He is the one who gets to write the story So, when you study history, you must always ask yourself, whose story am I missing Whose voice was suppressed so that this voice could come forth Once you have figured that out, you must find that story, too From there, you begin to get a clearer, yet still imperfect, picture this is a shockingly good debut novel it s accurately classified as a novel in stories, although there is a strong connective thread binding them together it opens in the eighteenth century with the story of effia, followed by the story of esi these women are half sisters who have never met, born to the same mother into different villages and different tribes in ghana effia marries an english slave trader while esi is herself sold into slavery the rest of the book travels the bloodlines of these two women through time in alternating chapters, we are presented with the perspectives of each subsequent generation born to the sisters, climbing the family tree for about 300 years and six generations, which means that after the initial story of each sister, there are twelve different POV chapters, each telling a new character s standalone story.in about 300 pages.phew.and i knew this about the structure from reading other reviews of the book, but by the time i finally read this myself thanks for the push, alex , i d forgot...

  7. says:

    And so they waited Ness and Sam and Kojo, working longer and harder in the fields than any of the other slaves so that even the Devil began to smile at the mention of their names They waited out the fall and then winter, listening for the sound that would tell them it was time, praying that they wouldn t be sold and separated before their chance came Homegoing was one of the Fiction books nominated for best books of the year by members on Goodreads It made the first round cut I m on a mission to read other desired TBR nominated books before the year is up Since there are many wonderful, HOMEGOING reviews before me, here on Goodreads.here s a little side dish to the already great community book pot Fantastic debut novel.powerful storytelling.Having the physical book made it easy to refer to the family tree of generations If I started to forget which person intimately belong to another, having the physical book made it easy to flip to the genealogy chart.The two main family sides to keep track of was Effie or Esi given my name is ElyseI had no problem keeping track of the connections that follow the E girls I had already heard from other readers that they wished the stories were longer of each character. information abou...

  8. says:

    This multigenerational epic has already gotten lots of attention, and it deserves every bit of it Gyasi s debut novel begins with two half sisters in 18th century Ghana, strangers to each other Effia marries a white man, and Esi is enslaved and taken to America The novel follows the children of these two women through the generations, alternating between Africa and America As we meet each new descendent, we see how the legacy of slavery plays out across history, both for the enslaved and for those complicit in the slave trade Each chapter reads like a single short story, but the forward momentum across time gives the book a novelistic feeling I adored this book, finding it illuminating, heart breaking, and beautiful to read I can t recommend it highly enough Teresa Prestonfrom The Best Books We Read In March 2017 ____________________Pretty much everyone at Book Riot has been raving about this book, but I m going to rave about it some I hope you guys aren t tired of hearing about this bo...

  9. says:

    My heart hurts and there is not enough Ben and Jerry s in this world to soothe it After reading Homegoing I am literally spent This is not a bad thing This is just a very sad novel Homegoing covers the mid 18th Century to present times It follows two different tribes in Ghana Fante and Asante , two different families, and specifically two half sisters, Effia and Esi and their offspring The sisters know nothing of each other Both sisters are living in Ghana One sister stays in Ghana and marries a British soldier working in the slave trade although the soldier is married to another woman in England and has a family there as well while the other sister is sold into slavery and is shipped to America Why did I give it 4 Stars as opposed to 5 The book was too much for me It spanned too much time and there were too many characters in it I felt part one was a solid 5 extremely powerful stars Part two was 3.5 stars because it felt a bit forced The narration by Dominic Hoffman was fantastic and 5 Star This is great on au...

  10. says:

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend Homegoing is a multi generational saga that follows the descendants of two half sisters, Effia and Esi, across three centuries, beginning in eighteenth century Ghana and arriving at the present day Each chapter of Homegoing introduces a new character, which means readers are subjected to endless amounts of backstory seamlessly integrated albeit wearisome In many cases, when a character s story reaches its apex, the chapter ends, giving no immediate sense of resolution Two chapters later, some explanation for how a character s story ends is tacked onto the narrative of whatever new ancestral character is being introduced Reading this book is akin to reading a collection of short stories, most of which lack a complete story arc The problem with introducing so many characters is that readers are afforded such limited time with each of them that it s difficult almost impossible to form any sort of emotional attachment to any of them It gives the sense that readers are distant bystanders, too far removed from the story to be personally invested The most notable characters are half sisters Effia and Esi The entire book hinges on their havi...

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