Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions

Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions PDF


Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions ❮Download❯ ➽ Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions Author Valeria Luiselli – Polishdarling.co.uk Structured around the forty questions Luiselli translates and asks undocumented Latin American children facing deportation, Tell Me How It Ends an expansion of her Freeman s essay of the same name hu How It PDF/EPUB ¿ Structured around the forty questions Luiselli translates and asks undocumented Latin American children facing deportation, Tell Me How It Ends an expansion of herFreeman s essay of the same name humanizes these young migrants and highlights the contradiction of the idea of America as a fiction for immigrants with the reality of racism and fear both here and back home.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format immigrants with the reality of racism and fear both here and back home."/>
  • Paperback
  • 128 pages
  • Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions
  • Valeria Luiselli
  • 09 April 2017
  • 1566894956

About the Author: Valeria Luiselli

How It PDF/EPUB ¿ Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in and grew up in South Africa Her novels and essays have been translated into many languages and her work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney s Some of her recent projects include a ballet libretto for the choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, performed by the New York City Ballet Tell Me PDF or in Lincoln Center in a pedestrian sound installation for the Serpentine Gallery in London and a novella in installments for workers in a juice factory in Mexico She lives in New York Citytp coffeehousepress authors v.



10 thoughts on “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions

  1. Adam Dalva Adam Dalva says:

    Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children Luiselli, who s an excellent writer though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence , has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer The goal is less about making an argument andabout trying to re shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children Luiselli, who s an excellent writer though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence , has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer The goal is less about making an argument andabout trying to re shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers and indignities of the process The ending is particularly strong on the human level, though it s apparent that Trump s election shifted the aim of the essay after the fact a passionate coda is tacked onto the end, but I wish understanding this probably wasn t possible that she d gone back through and adjusted some earlier sections accordingly TELL ME HOW IT ENDS is a great primer to a harrowing reality, and though I didn t come out of it with any greater understanding of what future policy should look like, I think it could do a lot of good if it reaches a wider audience

  2. Thomas Thomas says:

    An unsentimental yet compassionate book that centers the ongoing plight of Latin American child migrants in the United States Valeria Luiselli uses her role as a translator for these children to explore the many misconceptions people have about them e.g., they re rapists or drug dealers and reflect their truer lived experiences e.g., they re fleeing from immense hardship, poverty, pain and suffering When these kids come into the United States, they still encounter such hardship and racism, An unsentimental yet compassionate book that centers the ongoing plight of Latin American child migrants in the United States Valeria Luiselli uses her role as a translator for these children to explore the many misconceptions people have about them e.g., they re rapists or drug dealers and reflect their truer lived experiences e.g., they re fleeing from immense hardship, poverty, pain and suffering When these kids come into the United States, they still encounter such hardship and racism, it s saddening and angering I loved how Luiselli honors both the hope and hopelessness surrounding immigration, how she writes about her emotional reactions in her work as a translator while showcasing examples of action to support these children, and how she calls out the United States for our role in perpetuating arms and drug trafficking in Mexico and Central America On an odd side note, reading this book reminded me of what a guy I went out on a date with told me once While the guy and date were boring, he mentioned I think he had just graduated with his Master s in Public Policy that there s some form of legal thinking in which apparently, laws are supposed to be made to protect the most vulnerable given how all of us could ve been born into the position of being the most vulnerable, if not for our layers of privilege and power and how society replicates that privilege and power It s sad how politicians and others are so intent on maintaining xenophobia and racism when in reality any one of us could have been born into the types of situations Luiselli describes in this book, situations with lots of violence and no security I d recommend Tell Me How It Ends to anyone searching for a primer on our broken immigration system

  3. Carrie Carrie says:

    It is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather themodest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born I wish I could force every person who chants build a wall or asks why can t they just come here legally to read this book The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these chIt is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather themodest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born I wish I could force every person who chants build a wall or asks why can t they just come here legally to read this book The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these children for what they are refugees fleeing unimaginable violence, violence the US has had a significant hand in creating and inflaming If you ve read her fiction, you know she s a brilliant writer, but this is somethingit s gut wrenching, of course, but it s also a reminder that we don t have any time to lose, and that even our small acts of compassion are crucial Just yesterday, in my own community, ICE officers detained a DACA recipient one of our former students without a warrant, a man who organizes a food pantry for low income families, coaches soccer, volunteers at his church and community Locally, people are rallying in support, as is the ACLU nevertheless, even with community and legal support, and even as a DACA recipient, he is not safe My heart breaks for the children Luiselli encounters, who do not have even that support, and for the countless children who never made it at all

  4. Rincey Rincey says:

    The children who cross the Mexico border and arrive at the U.S border are not immigrants, not illegals, not merely undocumented minors Those children are refugees of a war, and, as such, they should all have the right to asylum But not all of them have it.Tell me how it ends, Mamma, my daughter asks me.I don t know Tell me what happens next.Sometimes I make up an ending, a happy one But most of the time I just say I don t know how it ends yet Watch me discuss itin my reading v The children who cross the Mexico border and arrive at the U.S border are not immigrants, not illegals, not merely undocumented minors Those children are refugees of a war, and, as such, they should all have the right to asylum But not all of them have it.Tell me how it ends, Mamma, my daughter asks me.I don t know Tell me what happens next.Sometimes I make up an ending, a happy one But most of the time I just say I don t know how it ends yet Watch me discuss itin my reading vlog

  5. jenni jenni says:

    i m such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl her prose is like honey on the tongue, it s sweet and syrupy and sticky, it s like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply it s a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received i m serious i m a fangirl.unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror show of an immi i m such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl her prose is like honey on the tongue, it s sweet and syrupy and sticky, it s like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply it s a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received i m serious i m a fangirl.unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror show of an immigration system, but specifically it constricts the optic onto the way the system brutalizes migrant children i cannot imagine the unending agony of working as a translator for spanish speaking refugee children and maintaining an undue sense of distance and impartiality while assisting them through the bureaucratic grindings of gaining legal entry into the U.S i feel personally compelled to thank her for doing such heartbreaking and necessary work, especially as she danced around her own slippery immigration status while awaiting her green card this book was all heart my heart flared up at her hushed advocacy for these children, for mitigating their pain during the most painful of journeys my heart broke, became bandaged, became inflamed it soared luiselli naturally takes the space to dispel many of the rumors and fictions surrounding public opinion on the migrant crisis that amounts on the southern borders, particularly ours and mexico s she softly splinters the hideous myth that children come here as listless vagabonds remaining under the radar in order to exploit the resources of america it turns out that children willfully give themselves over to border patrol agents, they willfully participate in the process of legally navigating the obscurity of immigration that largely works against them which is precisely where luiselli and her translating comes in.she also takes the space to condemn, in the most affable of ways, the manner in which the united states has perpetually rebuked their complicity in destabilizing governments in the northern triangle and mexico that aggravated the migrant crisis in the first place she condemns the opposition with such clarity and cleverness that it hardly reads as though she s yielding scorn to the parties that find it in their god fearing hearts to politically reproach innocent children caught in the maw of violence and abuse luiselli, it turns out, is the one here doing god s work.before the trump era defaced everything i basically ever knew, i didn t really toss around the phrase this should be required reading onto many books but books like this short, succinct, and sharp are things that should literally be read, by literally anyone with U.S citizenship we need reform, and not the type that this nightmare administration ghoulishly proposes we need advocacy we need something, anything, to bring aid and comfort to those most vulnerable and most injured by our poorly outdated and politically neglected systems, to author a postscript of justice that makes the story end well

  6. Paul Fulcher Paul Fulcher says:

    The children s stories are always shuffled, stuttered, always shattered beyond the repair of a narrative order The problem with trying to tell their story is that it has no beginning, no middle, and no end.In 2014, Valeria Luiselli, started writing a novel about the children seeking asylum in the US, and their treatment, including inhumane detention and deportation, by the Obama administration immigration system, in particular the priority juvenile docket that gave those summoned by court just The children s stories are always shuffled, stuttered, always shattered beyond the repair of a narrative order The problem with trying to tell their story is that it has no beginning, no middle, and no end.In 2014, Valeria Luiselli, started writing a novel about the children seeking asylum in the US, and their treatment, including inhumane detention and deportation, by the Obama administration immigration system, in particular the priority juvenile docket that gave those summoned by court just 21 days to prepare a defence The novel also was to cover a road trip taken to the border area, and in particular Apacher a, with her then husband, novelist lvaro Enrigue and their children respective step children I watch our own children sleep in the back seat of the car as we cross the George Washington Bridge into New Jersey I glance back now and then from the copilot s seat at my ten year old stepson, visiting us from Mexico, and my five year old daughter Behind the wheel, my husband concentrates on the road ahead It is the summer of 2014 We are waiting for our green cards to be either granted or denied and, in the meantime, we decide to go on a family road trip We will drive from Harlem, New York, to a town in Cochise County, Arizona, near the U.S Mexico border.When, after this trip, Luiselli s own immigration lawyer resigned from her case as she had volunteered to get involved in pro bono work for children facing deportation, Luiselli herself ended getting involved as a volunteer translator working in the court system Because being aware of what is happening in our era and choosing to do nothing about it has become unacceptable Because we cannot allow ourselves to go on normalizing horror and violence.Luiselli s first attempt to novelise her experience was overly literal, polemical and didactic using it as a vehicle for my own rage, stuffing it with everything from children s testimonies to the history of American interventionism in central America it just wasn t working There s a different way of assuming a political sense in fiction, I think So she instead documented her experiences and views in this essay, before working her experiences, including the gradual disintegration of her marriage which dated to the road trip, into her brilliant literary novel Lost Children Archive.Tell Me How It Ends An Essay in Forty Questions doesn t live up to the standards of the novel in literary terms but makes for a fascinating companion, to see the origins of Luiselli s novel, as well as an important discourse in its own rightWhy did you come to the United States That s the first question on the intake questionnaire for unaccompanied child migrants The questionnaire is used in the federal immigration court in New York City where I started working as a volunteer interpreter in 2015 My task there is a simple one I interview children, following the intake questionnaire, and then translate their stories from Spanish to English.The essay is structured around the forty questions from the intake questionnaire This has been designed by organisations trying to help the children, not by the US authorities, and is intended to draw out experiences that could help the children s cases in court, There were seven organizations in that coalition the Legal Aid Society, The Door, Catholic Charities, Central American Legal Assistance, Make the Road New York, Safe Passage, and Kids in Need of Defense and together they joined efforts to figure out a way to respond quickly and well to the docket It was they who put together the questions on the intake questionnaire that my niece and I, along with other volunteers, would be using while we conducted our interviews.but it doesn t make the process of asking the questions, and listening to the answers, any less harrowing, particularly as the right answers are the most awful ones Question seven on the questionnaire is Did anything happen on your trip to the U.S that scared you or hurt you The children seldom give details of their experiences along the journey through Mexico upon a first screening, and it s not necessarily useful to push them forinformation What happens to them between their home countries and their arrival in the United States can t always help their defense before an immigration judge, so the question doesn t make up a substantial part of the interview But, as a Mexican, this is the question I feel most ashamed of, because what happens to children during their journey through Mexico is always worse than what happens anywhere else.followed by a catalogue of rape, abduction, exploitation and murder.Luiselli notes that Most children came from Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras the three countries that make up the Northern Triangle and practically all of them were fleeing gang violence.and traces the root of much of this back to the US, Cold War support of dictatorial regime, gang warfare in US cities and the demand for drugs in the States When causes are discussed, the general consensus and underlying assumption seem to be that the origins are circumscribed to sending countries and their many local problems No one suggests that the causes are deeply embedded in our shared hemispheric history and are therefore not some distant problem in a foreign country that no one can locate on a map, but in fact a transnational problem that includes the United States not as a distant observer or passive victim that must now deal with thousands of unwanted children arriving at the southern border, but rather as an active historical participant in the circumstances that generated that problem But perhaps the most striking aspect is that this all happened in 2014 5 under President Obama Trump is but a footnote but one whose doubling down was clearly enabled by Obama s own normalisation of hostile polices The priority juvenile docket, in sum, was the government s coldest, cruelest possible answer to the arrival of refugee children.Read this for background, then read her brilliant novel

  7. shakespeareandspice shakespeareandspice says:

    Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.It begins with a very structured form of storytelling I Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.It begins with a very structured form of storytelling It starts off easy and simple But as Luiselli beings to involve herself further into their lives, the number of victims and their tragedies begin to weigh on her The failure of our system to help these children is not surprising given the current state of our politics, but the artificial stigma that we ve built up to dehumanize them dehumanizes us.John Kelly likes to think of some of them as too lazy to get off their asses but when you re asking someone, a child or their parent, to hand over their information willingly to a party that labels Nazis as some very fine people , one might pause to consider that there is a level of trust his President has yet to yearn This is setting aside the fact that his administration seems to also have a fondness for detaining fathers and mothers as they drop off their kids at school.Luiselli also fills in the crucial context on why US faces an influx of Latin American immigrants, and how we ve even contributed to the violence that s forced immigrants to flee their homes in the first place And the crossing itself comes with a range of its own horrors rape, kidnappings, and murder Those who did not survive have left bones in sand that may never be recovered or returned to their close relatives Undocumented immigrants are not here to take your jobs, they are merely here to live a little longer.This is perhaps the most appropriate time to read such a collection when one party, that controls majority of the government, has decided to hold children hostages for their greedy, racist, white supremacist agenda Americans need to read this Read this and then call your senators and reps to take action.We define how this ends

  8. Eric Anderson Eric Anderson says:

    This short and powerful nonfiction piece by Valeria Luiselli is such a poignantly constructed insight into the immigration crisis debate in America now Luiselli relates her experiences working as a volunteer interviewing thousands of children from Central America who have been smuggled into the United States and are seeking residency citizenship She asks them questions from an intake questionnaire created by immigration lawyers that will play a large part in determining if the children will be This short and powerful nonfiction piece by Valeria Luiselli is such a poignantly constructed insight into the immigration crisis debate in America now Luiselli relates her experiences working as a volunteer interviewing thousands of children from Central America who have been smuggled into the United States and are seeking residency citizenship She asks them questions from an intake questionnaire created by immigration lawyers that will play a large part in determining if the children will be granted status to remain or face deportation Going through the questions one at a time she explains the way the immigration system is designed to keep as many people out as possible without accounting for these children s vulnerable situation or America s role in the creation of this crisis At the same time, she relates her personal experiences as a Mexican immigrant whose own ability to work was restricted because of a delay with her visa It s an achingly personal book that makes a strong political statement It skilfully asserts something that shouldn t need to be stated, but which we need to be reminded of in a political climate that overwhelmingly seeks to vilify immigrants that these are children who have suffered through hell and that by treating them as criminals we are only adding to their trauma.Read my full review of Tell Me How It Ends by Valeria Luiselli on LonesomeReader

  9. Julie Ehlers Julie Ehlers says:

    In this brief book that takes place during the Obama administration, novelist Valeria Luiselli recounts her experience volunteering as a translator interpreter for refugee children in NYC immigration court Tell Me How It Ends is one of those books that doesn t need a long summary or analysis, or at least I don t feel the need to provide one Unless you already know a lot about this topic, you should read this book The information it imparts is information everyone should have.

  10. Daniel Chaikin Daniel Chaikin says:

    This is what I posted on Litsy about an hour ago It s only now, thinking about it, that I begin to feel this book s relentless empty chill American cruelty knows no bounds once it s legalized Here the emotional shocks of how we treat these unaccompanied child refugees come so quickly in this little book that it s almost not possible to process while reading, or even at all What they go through, in the many thousandsthe little cruel window Luiselli witnessedwhat can you sayI finished This is what I posted on Litsy about an hour ago It s only now, thinking about it, that I begin to feel this book s relentless empty chill American cruelty knows no bounds once it s legalized Here the emotional shocks of how we treat these unaccompanied child refugees come so quickly in this little book that it s almost not possible to process while reading, or even at all What they go through, in the many thousandsthe little cruel window Luiselli witnessedwhat can you sayI finished to book two days ago, and it really does go by quick Luiselli served as a translator of the US federal immigration court with the role of helping unaccompanied child refugees answer a 40 question official questionnaire These are standard questions for all refugees, but don t exactly apply to young children who can t comprehend them in any language Why did they come the United States, How did they get here, where did they enterthey don t know how to answer these questions Helping one girl, she asks, Texas Arizona The girl response, Yes Texas Arizona The road to the US includes a train through Mexico, call La Bestia, for all of them, and they all turned themselves in to US immigration seeking asylum, some desperately because if they aren t picked up, they will die of exposure in the desert They came from Central America A Mexican child is deported immediately and has no opportunity to claim refugee status These children will all be deported unless they find a lawyer that they have to pay for themselves The few who find lawyers, all working for free, have a fair chance So, essentially most of these deportations are not the legal system at work, but the legal system broken.Luiselli starts a question at a time, working in her reflections and, of course, muchaware of the weight of the answers to these questions than the children are The pace picks up a little, and then suddenly your at question 40 and you have accumulated a huge assortment of unprocessed tragedies to work through, or not I guess I just put the book down for a few days What can you say 4 Tell Me How It Ends An Essay in 40 Questions by Valeria Luiselliintroduction Jon Lee Andersontranslation Lizzie Davis expanded essayspublished 2016 in English, then translated to Spanish and expanded by Luiselli The extensions were then translated back to English in 2017 by Davisformat 119 page Paperbackacquired Januaryread Jan 18 24time reading 2 hr 34 min, 1.3 min pagerating 4

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10 thoughts on “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions

  1. Adam Dalva Adam Dalva says:

    Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children Luiselli, who s an excellent writer though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence , has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer The goal is less about making an argument andabout trying to re shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children Luiselli, who s an excellent writer though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence , has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer The goal is less about making an argument andabout trying to re shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers and indignities of the process The ending is particularly strong on the human level, though it s apparent that Trump s election shifted the aim of the essay after the fact a passionate coda is tacked onto the end, but I wish understanding this probably wasn t possible that she d gone back through and adjusted some earlier sections accordingly TELL ME HOW IT ENDS is a great primer to a harrowing reality, and though I didn t come out of it with any greater understanding of what future policy should look like, I think it could do a lot of good if it reaches a wider audience


  2. Thomas Thomas says:

    An unsentimental yet compassionate book that centers the ongoing plight of Latin American child migrants in the United States Valeria Luiselli uses her role as a translator for these children to explore the many misconceptions people have about them e.g., they re rapists or drug dealers and reflect their truer lived experiences e.g., they re fleeing from immense hardship, poverty, pain and suffering When these kids come into the United States, they still encounter such hardship and racism, An unsentimental yet compassionate book that centers the ongoing plight of Latin American child migrants in the United States Valeria Luiselli uses her role as a translator for these children to explore the many misconceptions people have about them e.g., they re rapists or drug dealers and reflect their truer lived experiences e.g., they re fleeing from immense hardship, poverty, pain and suffering When these kids come into the United States, they still encounter such hardship and racism, it s saddening and angering I loved how Luiselli honors both the hope and hopelessness surrounding immigration, how she writes about her emotional reactions in her work as a translator while showcasing examples of action to support these children, and how she calls out the United States for our role in perpetuating arms and drug trafficking in Mexico and Central America On an odd side note, reading this book reminded me of what a guy I went out on a date with told me once While the guy and date were boring, he mentioned I think he had just graduated with his Master s in Public Policy that there s some form of legal thinking in which apparently, laws are supposed to be made to protect the most vulnerable given how all of us could ve been born into the position of being the most vulnerable, if not for our layers of privilege and power and how society replicates that privilege and power It s sad how politicians and others are so intent on maintaining xenophobia and racism when in reality any one of us could have been born into the types of situations Luiselli describes in this book, situations with lots of violence and no security I d recommend Tell Me How It Ends to anyone searching for a primer on our broken immigration system


  3. Carrie Carrie says:

    It is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather themodest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born I wish I could force every person who chants build a wall or asks why can t they just come here legally to read this book The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these chIt is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather themodest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born I wish I could force every person who chants build a wall or asks why can t they just come here legally to read this book The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these children for what they are refugees fleeing unimaginable violence, violence the US has had a significant hand in creating and inflaming If you ve read her fiction, you know she s a brilliant writer, but this is somethingit s gut wrenching, of course, but it s also a reminder that we don t have any time to lose, and that even our small acts of compassion are crucial Just yesterday, in my own community, ICE officers detained a DACA recipient one of our former students without a warrant, a man who organizes a food pantry for low income families, coaches soccer, volunteers at his church and community Locally, people are rallying in support, as is the ACLU nevertheless, even with community and legal support, and even as a DACA recipient, he is not safe My heart breaks for the children Luiselli encounters, who do not have even that support, and for the countless children who never made it at all


  4. Rincey Rincey says:

    The children who cross the Mexico border and arrive at the U.S border are not immigrants, not illegals, not merely undocumented minors Those children are refugees of a war, and, as such, they should all have the right to asylum But not all of them have it.Tell me how it ends, Mamma, my daughter asks me.I don t know Tell me what happens next.Sometimes I make up an ending, a happy one But most of the time I just say I don t know how it ends yet Watch me discuss itin my reading v The children who cross the Mexico border and arrive at the U.S border are not immigrants, not illegals, not merely undocumented minors Those children are refugees of a war, and, as such, they should all have the right to asylum But not all of them have it.Tell me how it ends, Mamma, my daughter asks me.I don t know Tell me what happens next.Sometimes I make up an ending, a happy one But most of the time I just say I don t know how it ends yet Watch me discuss itin my reading vlog


  5. jenni jenni says:

    i m such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl her prose is like honey on the tongue, it s sweet and syrupy and sticky, it s like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply it s a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received i m serious i m a fangirl.unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror show of an immi i m such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl her prose is like honey on the tongue, it s sweet and syrupy and sticky, it s like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply it s a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received i m serious i m a fangirl.unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror show of an immigration system, but specifically it constricts the optic onto the way the system brutalizes migrant children i cannot imagine the unending agony of working as a translator for spanish speaking refugee children and maintaining an undue sense of distance and impartiality while assisting them through the bureaucratic grindings of gaining legal entry into the U.S i feel personally compelled to thank her for doing such heartbreaking and necessary work, especially as she danced around her own slippery immigration status while awaiting her green card this book was all heart my heart flared up at her hushed advocacy for these children, for mitigating their pain during the most painful of journeys my heart broke, became bandaged, became inflamed it soared luiselli naturally takes the space to dispel many of the rumors and fictions surrounding public opinion on the migrant crisis that amounts on the southern borders, particularly ours and mexico s she softly splinters the hideous myth that children come here as listless vagabonds remaining under the radar in order to exploit the resources of america it turns out that children willfully give themselves over to border patrol agents, they willfully participate in the process of legally navigating the obscurity of immigration that largely works against them which is precisely where luiselli and her translating comes in.she also takes the space to condemn, in the most affable of ways, the manner in which the united states has perpetually rebuked their complicity in destabilizing governments in the northern triangle and mexico that aggravated the migrant crisis in the first place she condemns the opposition with such clarity and cleverness that it hardly reads as though she s yielding scorn to the parties that find it in their god fearing hearts to politically reproach innocent children caught in the maw of violence and abuse luiselli, it turns out, is the one here doing god s work.before the trump era defaced everything i basically ever knew, i didn t really toss around the phrase this should be required reading onto many books but books like this short, succinct, and sharp are things that should literally be read, by literally anyone with U.S citizenship we need reform, and not the type that this nightmare administration ghoulishly proposes we need advocacy we need something, anything, to bring aid and comfort to those most vulnerable and most injured by our poorly outdated and politically neglected systems, to author a postscript of justice that makes the story end well


  6. Paul Fulcher Paul Fulcher says:

    The children s stories are always shuffled, stuttered, always shattered beyond the repair of a narrative order The problem with trying to tell their story is that it has no beginning, no middle, and no end.In 2014, Valeria Luiselli, started writing a novel about the children seeking asylum in the US, and their treatment, including inhumane detention and deportation, by the Obama administration immigration system, in particular the priority juvenile docket that gave those summoned by court just The children s stories are always shuffled, stuttered, always shattered beyond the repair of a narrative order The problem with trying to tell their story is that it has no beginning, no middle, and no end.In 2014, Valeria Luiselli, started writing a novel about the children seeking asylum in the US, and their treatment, including inhumane detention and deportation, by the Obama administration immigration system, in particular the priority juvenile docket that gave those summoned by court just 21 days to prepare a defence The novel also was to cover a road trip taken to the border area, and in particular Apacher a, with her then husband, novelist lvaro Enrigue and their children respective step children I watch our own children sleep in the back seat of the car as we cross the George Washington Bridge into New Jersey I glance back now and then from the copilot s seat at my ten year old stepson, visiting us from Mexico, and my five year old daughter Behind the wheel, my husband concentrates on the road ahead It is the summer of 2014 We are waiting for our green cards to be either granted or denied and, in the meantime, we decide to go on a family road trip We will drive from Harlem, New York, to a town in Cochise County, Arizona, near the U.S Mexico border.When, after this trip, Luiselli s own immigration lawyer resigned from her case as she had volunteered to get involved in pro bono work for children facing deportation, Luiselli herself ended getting involved as a volunteer translator working in the court system Because being aware of what is happening in our era and choosing to do nothing about it has become unacceptable Because we cannot allow ourselves to go on normalizing horror and violence.Luiselli s first attempt to novelise her experience was overly literal, polemical and didactic using it as a vehicle for my own rage, stuffing it with everything from children s testimonies to the history of American interventionism in central America it just wasn t working There s a different way of assuming a political sense in fiction, I think So she instead documented her experiences and views in this essay, before working her experiences, including the gradual disintegration of her marriage which dated to the road trip, into her brilliant literary novel Lost Children Archive.Tell Me How It Ends An Essay in Forty Questions doesn t live up to the standards of the novel in literary terms but makes for a fascinating companion, to see the origins of Luiselli s novel, as well as an important discourse in its own rightWhy did you come to the United States That s the first question on the intake questionnaire for unaccompanied child migrants The questionnaire is used in the federal immigration court in New York City where I started working as a volunteer interpreter in 2015 My task there is a simple one I interview children, following the intake questionnaire, and then translate their stories from Spanish to English.The essay is structured around the forty questions from the intake questionnaire This has been designed by organisations trying to help the children, not by the US authorities, and is intended to draw out experiences that could help the children s cases in court, There were seven organizations in that coalition the Legal Aid Society, The Door, Catholic Charities, Central American Legal Assistance, Make the Road New York, Safe Passage, and Kids in Need of Defense and together they joined efforts to figure out a way to respond quickly and well to the docket It was they who put together the questions on the intake questionnaire that my niece and I, along with other volunteers, would be using while we conducted our interviews.but it doesn t make the process of asking the questions, and listening to the answers, any less harrowing, particularly as the right answers are the most awful ones Question seven on the questionnaire is Did anything happen on your trip to the U.S that scared you or hurt you The children seldom give details of their experiences along the journey through Mexico upon a first screening, and it s not necessarily useful to push them forinformation What happens to them between their home countries and their arrival in the United States can t always help their defense before an immigration judge, so the question doesn t make up a substantial part of the interview But, as a Mexican, this is the question I feel most ashamed of, because what happens to children during their journey through Mexico is always worse than what happens anywhere else.followed by a catalogue of rape, abduction, exploitation and murder.Luiselli notes that Most children came from Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras the three countries that make up the Northern Triangle and practically all of them were fleeing gang violence.and traces the root of much of this back to the US, Cold War support of dictatorial regime, gang warfare in US cities and the demand for drugs in the States When causes are discussed, the general consensus and underlying assumption seem to be that the origins are circumscribed to sending countries and their many local problems No one suggests that the causes are deeply embedded in our shared hemispheric history and are therefore not some distant problem in a foreign country that no one can locate on a map, but in fact a transnational problem that includes the United States not as a distant observer or passive victim that must now deal with thousands of unwanted children arriving at the southern border, but rather as an active historical participant in the circumstances that generated that problem But perhaps the most striking aspect is that this all happened in 2014 5 under President Obama Trump is but a footnote but one whose doubling down was clearly enabled by Obama s own normalisation of hostile polices The priority juvenile docket, in sum, was the government s coldest, cruelest possible answer to the arrival of refugee children.Read this for background, then read her brilliant novel


  7. shakespeareandspice shakespeareandspice says:

    Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.It begins with a very structured form of storytelling I Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.It begins with a very structured form of storytelling It starts off easy and simple But as Luiselli beings to involve herself further into their lives, the number of victims and their tragedies begin to weigh on her The failure of our system to help these children is not surprising given the current state of our politics, but the artificial stigma that we ve built up to dehumanize them dehumanizes us.John Kelly likes to think of some of them as too lazy to get off their asses but when you re asking someone, a child or their parent, to hand over their information willingly to a party that labels Nazis as some very fine people , one might pause to consider that there is a level of trust his President has yet to yearn This is setting aside the fact that his administration seems to also have a fondness for detaining fathers and mothers as they drop off their kids at school.Luiselli also fills in the crucial context on why US faces an influx of Latin American immigrants, and how we ve even contributed to the violence that s forced immigrants to flee their homes in the first place And the crossing itself comes with a range of its own horrors rape, kidnappings, and murder Those who did not survive have left bones in sand that may never be recovered or returned to their close relatives Undocumented immigrants are not here to take your jobs, they are merely here to live a little longer.This is perhaps the most appropriate time to read such a collection when one party, that controls majority of the government, has decided to hold children hostages for their greedy, racist, white supremacist agenda Americans need to read this Read this and then call your senators and reps to take action.We define how this ends


  8. Eric Anderson Eric Anderson says:

    This short and powerful nonfiction piece by Valeria Luiselli is such a poignantly constructed insight into the immigration crisis debate in America now Luiselli relates her experiences working as a volunteer interviewing thousands of children from Central America who have been smuggled into the United States and are seeking residency citizenship She asks them questions from an intake questionnaire created by immigration lawyers that will play a large part in determining if the children will be This short and powerful nonfiction piece by Valeria Luiselli is such a poignantly constructed insight into the immigration crisis debate in America now Luiselli relates her experiences working as a volunteer interviewing thousands of children from Central America who have been smuggled into the United States and are seeking residency citizenship She asks them questions from an intake questionnaire created by immigration lawyers that will play a large part in determining if the children will be granted status to remain or face deportation Going through the questions one at a time she explains the way the immigration system is designed to keep as many people out as possible without accounting for these children s vulnerable situation or America s role in the creation of this crisis At the same time, she relates her personal experiences as a Mexican immigrant whose own ability to work was restricted because of a delay with her visa It s an achingly personal book that makes a strong political statement It skilfully asserts something that shouldn t need to be stated, but which we need to be reminded of in a political climate that overwhelmingly seeks to vilify immigrants that these are children who have suffered through hell and that by treating them as criminals we are only adding to their trauma.Read my full review of Tell Me How It Ends by Valeria Luiselli on LonesomeReader


  9. Julie Ehlers Julie Ehlers says:

    In this brief book that takes place during the Obama administration, novelist Valeria Luiselli recounts her experience volunteering as a translator interpreter for refugee children in NYC immigration court Tell Me How It Ends is one of those books that doesn t need a long summary or analysis, or at least I don t feel the need to provide one Unless you already know a lot about this topic, you should read this book The information it imparts is information everyone should have.


  10. Daniel Chaikin Daniel Chaikin says:

    This is what I posted on Litsy about an hour ago It s only now, thinking about it, that I begin to feel this book s relentless empty chill American cruelty knows no bounds once it s legalized Here the emotional shocks of how we treat these unaccompanied child refugees come so quickly in this little book that it s almost not possible to process while reading, or even at all What they go through, in the many thousandsthe little cruel window Luiselli witnessedwhat can you sayI finished This is what I posted on Litsy about an hour ago It s only now, thinking about it, that I begin to feel this book s relentless empty chill American cruelty knows no bounds once it s legalized Here the emotional shocks of how we treat these unaccompanied child refugees come so quickly in this little book that it s almost not possible to process while reading, or even at all What they go through, in the many thousandsthe little cruel window Luiselli witnessedwhat can you sayI finished to book two days ago, and it really does go by quick Luiselli served as a translator of the US federal immigration court with the role of helping unaccompanied child refugees answer a 40 question official questionnaire These are standard questions for all refugees, but don t exactly apply to young children who can t comprehend them in any language Why did they come the United States, How did they get here, where did they enterthey don t know how to answer these questions Helping one girl, she asks, Texas Arizona The girl response, Yes Texas Arizona The road to the US includes a train through Mexico, call La Bestia, for all of them, and they all turned themselves in to US immigration seeking asylum, some desperately because if they aren t picked up, they will die of exposure in the desert They came from Central America A Mexican child is deported immediately and has no opportunity to claim refugee status These children will all be deported unless they find a lawyer that they have to pay for themselves The few who find lawyers, all working for free, have a fair chance So, essentially most of these deportations are not the legal system at work, but the legal system broken.Luiselli starts a question at a time, working in her reflections and, of course, muchaware of the weight of the answers to these questions than the children are The pace picks up a little, and then suddenly your at question 40 and you have accumulated a huge assortment of unprocessed tragedies to work through, or not I guess I just put the book down for a few days What can you say 4 Tell Me How It Ends An Essay in 40 Questions by Valeria Luiselliintroduction Jon Lee Andersontranslation Lizzie Davis expanded essayspublished 2016 in English, then translated to Spanish and expanded by Luiselli The extensions were then translated back to English in 2017 by Davisformat 119 page Paperbackacquired Januaryread Jan 18 24time reading 2 hr 34 min, 1.3 min pagerating 4


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