Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests

Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests Kindle


    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format uses By the twentieth century, it appeared that old growth forests in the eastern United States were gone, replaced by cities, farms, transportation Ecology and PDF/EPUB ² networks, and second growth forests Since that time, however, numerous remnants of eastern old growth have been discovered, meticulously mapped, and studied Many of these ancient stands retain surprisingly robust complexity and vigor, and forest ecologists are eager to develop strategies for their restoration and for nurturing additional stands of old growth that will foster biological diversity, reduce impacts of climate change, and serve as benchmarks for how natural systems operate and Recovery of eBook ☆ Forest ecologists William Keeton and Andrew Barton bring together a volume that breaks new ground in our understanding of ecological systems and their importance for forest resilience in an age of rapid environmental change This edited volume covers a broad geographic canvas, from eastern Canada and the Upper Great Lakes states to the deep South It looks at a wide diversity of ecosystems, including spruce fir, northern deciduous, southern Appalachian deciduous, southern swamp hardwoods, and longleaf pine Chapters authored by leading old growth experts examine topics of contemporary forest ecology including forest structure and dynamics, below ground soil processes, biological diversity, differences between historical and modern forests, carbon and climate change mitigation, management of old growth, andThis thoughtful treatise broadly communicates important new discoveries to scientists, land managers, and students and breathes fresh life into the hope for sensible, effective management of old growth stands in eastern forests."/>
  • Paperback
  • 360 pages
  • Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests
  • Andrew M. Barton
  • 10 April 2017
  • 9781610918909

11 thoughts on “Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests

  1. David Robertson David Robertson says:

    To readers completing Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old Growth Forests, three features of old woodlands in eastern North America will be abundantly clear First, defining and identifying old growth is extremely challenging, and the definitions and designations are somewhat dependent on the ecosystems under consideration Second, an infinitesimally small percentage of forest in eastern North America meets even the broadest and most inclusive definition of old growth Third, because the areal extent of old growth forest is so limited, ecologists are challenged to characterize accurately the natural disturbance regimes that produced old growth characteristics and, thus, to replicate those regimes to manage and restore old growth.With these caveats in mind, readers interested in eastern North American forests will find that editors Andrew Barton and William Keeton have produced an excellent compilation of the latest research and opinions regarding old growth forests Forest stewards, natural area managers, landscape ecologists, and forest policymakers should find a wealth of valuable and up to date information presented in an accessible style that guarantees a better understanding and appreciation for these precious resources Readers will be amply rewarded for their time invested in reading the book I recommend it highly for its comprehensive and thorough treatment of the topic.Unlike some edited volumes of scientific papers that disappoint because the contributed papers are inconsistent in style, repeat information among papers, or include papers inordinately focused on a narrow aspect of a general subject, Barton and Keeton have produced a carefully edited collection of 15 papers with remarkably consistent style The overall impression is that the editors conceived of producing a book that would review the state of knowledge about old growth forests, and then invited experts to prepare papers addressing specific aspects of those forests The editors, however, reserved a great deal of license to edit the papers to ensure that the individual contributions were consistent in style and tone The result is a book that, while it has 32 contributors, reads as if it had a single author.Though not explicitly demarcated, the book is divided into two sections Following a general introduction, the first section consists of seven papers called chapters that treat old growth forests by community, beginning in the south and moving northward Thus, the chapters examine, in turn, southeastern floodplain forests, southeastern fire dependent pine savannahs, southern Appalachian forests, northeastern woodlands, Great Lakes old growth, and boreal landscapes Each chapter characterizes the forest community under consideration, provides an overview of the amount of old growth forest remaining in the ecosystem, and discusses the natural disturbance regime that generates and maintains that community Each chapter ends with a conclusion these chapter conclusions are the least consistent sections among the papers, with some conclusions recapitulating the main points of the chapters, and others offering management and restoration scenarios that really warrant their own separate sections within the papers Chapter 5 is an anomaly in this portion of the book because it is a research paper in which the authors evaluate topographic influences on vegetation patterns in Appalachian forests While certainly interesting and valuable, the findings here are only tangentially related to old growth forests.Natural disturbance patterns are extremely important in dictating the character of old growth forest ecosystems, and the book justifiably focuses a great deal of attention on disturbance history The lack of frequent, landscape scale disturbance in protected areas within the southern Appalachians allowed those cove forests to develop into what have become the quintessential old growth forest that the term evokes for many people What the book emphasizes, though, is that forest communities dominated by frequent, widespread disturbance such as flooding in lowland swamp forests and large, stand clearing fires in pine savannahs and boreal forests, rarely if ever develop the characters associated with classic southern Appalachian old growth As a result, the contributors emphasize that ecologists need to adjust their expectations about old growth to the ecosystem under consideration in order to temper expectations and enhance stewardship of these systems The second half of the book examines specific characteristics of old growth forest, focusing on how the dynamic ecological processes in old growth differ from those in less mature woodlands These chapters explore the interaction of forests with steams, edaphic and other belowground dynamics, biological diversity, the impact of invasive organisms, and the role of old growth in carbon sequestration Somewhat out of context in the midst of this grouping is a consideration of employing silvicultural strategies for managing existing old growth and, importantly, for nudging sub mature and mature forests into successional trajectories that ultimately will yield old growth characteristics as the forests age This discussion is the most technical chapter in the book and may be a bit daunting for readers who are not foresters or ecologists Further, the suggestion that human manipulation can help to produce conditions that people have so effectively eliminated through centuries of meddling in forests may unsettle some readers the authors of this chapter may have anticipated this reaction because they go to great lengths to reassure their audience that such manipulations can be and, in fact, have been effective for enhancing old growth character.The editors cap off the book with a thoughtful assessment and synthesis of the main concepts presented throughout the volume, and include a generally optimistic forecast for old growth in eastern North America They also wisely encourage readers to consider cultural as well as scientific attributes when assessing the value of old growth forests.Each chapter is supported by extensive references for researchers, the exhaustive compilation of information related to old growth forests alone may be worth the price of the book The text is supplemented by a section of seven color plates grouped in the first third of the book four of the plates depict regional vegetation communities, three of which are reproduced at a scale that makes interpretation difficult The editors also include a useful glossary, though a few of the terms in the chapter on silvicultural strategies for developing old growth character were not included in the glossary.


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Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests ❰KINDLE❯ ✽ Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests Author Andrew M. Barton – Polishdarling.co.uk The landscapes of North America, including eastern forests, have been shaped by humans for millennia, through fire, agriculture, hunting, and other means But the arrival of Europeans on America s east Recovery of PDF Å The landscapes of North America, including eastern forests, have been shaped by humans for millennia, through fire, agriculture, hunting, and other means But the arrival of Europeans on America s eastern shores several centuries ago ushered in the rapid conversion of forests and woodlands to other land uses By the twentieth century, it appeared that old growth forests in the eastern United States were gone, replaced by cities, farms, transportation Ecology and PDF/EPUB ² networks, and second growth forests Since that time, however, numerous remnants of eastern old growth have been discovered, meticulously mapped, and studied Many of these ancient stands retain surprisingly robust complexity and vigor, and forest ecologists are eager to develop strategies for their restoration and for nurturing additional stands of old growth that will foster biological diversity, reduce impacts of climate change, and serve as benchmarks for how natural systems operate and Recovery of eBook ☆ Forest ecologists William Keeton and Andrew Barton bring together a volume that breaks new ground in our understanding of ecological systems and their importance for forest resilience in an age of rapid environmental change This edited volume covers a broad geographic canvas, from eastern Canada and the Upper Great Lakes states to the deep South It looks at a wide diversity of ecosystems, including spruce fir, northern deciduous, southern Appalachian deciduous, southern swamp hardwoods, and longleaf pine Chapters authored by leading old growth experts examine topics of contemporary forest ecology including forest structure and dynamics, below ground soil processes, biological diversity, differences between historical and modern forests, carbon and climate change mitigation, management of old growth, andThis thoughtful treatise broadly communicates important new discoveries to scientists, land managers, and students and breathes fresh life into the hope for sensible, effective management of old growth stands in eastern forests.


11 thoughts on “Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old-Growth Forests

  1. David Robertson David Robertson says:

    To readers completing Ecology and Recovery of Eastern Old Growth Forests, three features of old woodlands in eastern North America will be abundantly clear First, defining and identifying old growth is extremely challenging, and the definitions and designations are somewhat dependent on the ecosystems under consideration Second, an infinitesimally small percentage of forest in eastern North America meets even the broadest and most inclusive definition of old growth Third, because the areal extent of old growth forest is so limited, ecologists are challenged to characterize accurately the natural disturbance regimes that produced old growth characteristics and, thus, to replicate those regimes to manage and restore old growth.With these caveats in mind, readers interested in eastern North American forests will find that editors Andrew Barton and William Keeton have produced an excellent compilation of the latest research and opinions regarding old growth forests Forest stewards, natural area managers, landscape ecologists, and forest policymakers should find a wealth of valuable and up to date information presented in an accessible style that guarantees a better understanding and appreciation for these precious resources Readers will be amply rewarded for their time invested in reading the book I recommend it highly for its comprehensive and thorough treatment of the topic.Unlike some edited volumes of scientific papers that disappoint because the contributed papers are inconsistent in style, repeat information among papers, or include papers inordinately focused on a narrow aspect of a general subject, Barton and Keeton have produced a carefully edited collection of 15 papers with remarkably consistent style The overall impression is that the editors conceived of producing a book that would review the state of knowledge about old growth forests, and then invited experts to prepare papers addressing specific aspects of those forests The editors, however, reserved a great deal of license to edit the papers to ensure that the individual contributions were consistent in style and tone The result is a book that, while it has 32 contributors, reads as if it had a single author.Though not explicitly demarcated, the book is divided into two sections Following a general introduction, the first section consists of seven papers called chapters that treat old growth forests by community, beginning in the south and moving northward Thus, the chapters examine, in turn, southeastern floodplain forests, southeastern fire dependent pine savannahs, southern Appalachian forests, northeastern woodlands, Great Lakes old growth, and boreal landscapes Each chapter characterizes the forest community under consideration, provides an overview of the amount of old growth forest remaining in the ecosystem, and discusses the natural disturbance regime that generates and maintains that community Each chapter ends with a conclusion these chapter conclusions are the least consistent sections among the papers, with some conclusions recapitulating the main points of the chapters, and others offering management and restoration scenarios that really warrant their own separate sections within the papers Chapter 5 is an anomaly in this portion of the book because it is a research paper in which the authors evaluate topographic influences on vegetation patterns in Appalachian forests While certainly interesting and valuable, the findings here are only tangentially related to old growth forests.Natural disturbance patterns are extremely important in dictating the character of old growth forest ecosystems, and the book justifiably focuses a great deal of attention on disturbance history The lack of frequent, landscape scale disturbance in protected areas within the southern Appalachians allowed those cove forests to develop into what have become the quintessential old growth forest that the term evokes for many people What the book emphasizes, though, is that forest communities dominated by frequent, widespread disturbance such as flooding in lowland swamp forests and large, stand clearing fires in pine savannahs and boreal forests, rarely if ever develop the characters associated with classic southern Appalachian old growth As a result, the contributors emphasize that ecologists need to adjust their expectations about old growth to the ecosystem under consideration in order to temper expectations and enhance stewardship of these systems The second half of the book examines specific characteristics of old growth forest, focusing on how the dynamic ecological processes in old growth differ from those in less mature woodlands These chapters explore the interaction of forests with steams, edaphic and other belowground dynamics, biological diversity, the impact of invasive organisms, and the role of old growth in carbon sequestration Somewhat out of context in the midst of this grouping is a consideration of employing silvicultural strategies for managing existing old growth and, importantly, for nudging sub mature and mature forests into successional trajectories that ultimately will yield old growth characteristics as the forests age This discussion is the most technical chapter in the book and may be a bit daunting for readers who are not foresters or ecologists Further, the suggestion that human manipulation can help to produce conditions that people have so effectively eliminated through centuries of meddling in forests may unsettle some readers the authors of this chapter may have anticipated this reaction because they go to great lengths to reassure their audience that such manipulations can be and, in fact, have been effective for enhancing old growth character.The editors cap off the book with a thoughtful assessment and synthesis of the main concepts presented throughout the volume, and include a generally optimistic forecast for old growth in eastern North America They also wisely encourage readers to consider cultural as well as scientific attributes when assessing the value of old growth forests.Each chapter is supported by extensive references for researchers, the exhaustive compilation of information related to old growth forests alone may be worth the price of the book The text is supplemented by a section of seven color plates grouped in the first third of the book four of the plates depict regional vegetation communities, three of which are reproduced at a scale that makes interpretation difficult The editors also include a useful glossary, though a few of the terms in the chapter on silvicultural strategies for developing old growth character were not included in the glossary.


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