Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees

Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees ePUB

Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees ❴Download❵ ➺ Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees Author William Bryant Logan – Polishdarling.co.uk Once, farmers knew how to make a living hedge and fed their flocks on tree branch hay Rural people knew how to prune hazel to foster abundance both of edible nuts, and of straight, strong, flexible ro Once, Tending the Endless Gift PDF/EPUB or farmers knew how to Tending the PDF Ì make a living hedge and fed their flocks on tree branch hay Rural people knew how to prune hazel to foster abundance both of edible nuts, and of straight, strong, flexible rods for bridges, walls, and baskets Townspeople cut their beeches to make charcoal to fuel ironworks Shipwrights Sprout Lands: MOBI :ï shaped oaks to make hulls No place could prosper without its inhabitants knowing how to cut their trees so they would sprout againPruning the trees didn t destroy them Rather, it created the healthiest, most sustainable and most diverse woodlands that we have ever known In this journey from the English fens to Spain, Lands: Tending the PDF Å Japan, and California, William Bryant Logan rediscovers what was once an everyday ecology He offers us both practical knowledge about how to live with trees to mutual benefit and hope that humans may again learn what the persistence and generosity of trees can teach.


10 thoughts on “Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees

  1. Cheryl Gatling Cheryl Gatling says:

    The short version is that this is a book about coppicing and pollarding, techniques for managing forests that were once nearly universal, and are now almost completely forgotten.In coppicing, young trees are cut down, and then they spring back by sending up many straight shoots from the roots In pollarding, the tree is allowed to grow a sturdy trunk, but the branches are cut off Again, the branches send out many small shoots These shoots can be harvested, year after year, without killing the The short version is that this is a book about coppicing and pollarding, techniques for managing forests that were once nearly universal, and are now almost completely forgotten.In coppicing, young trees are cut down, and then they spring back by sending up many straight shoots from the roots In pollarding, the tree is allowed to grow a sturdy trunk, but the branches are cut off Again, the branches send out many small shoots These shoots can be harvested, year after year, without killing the tree Shoots harvested after one year would be whippy, flexible sticks that could be used to make baskets, or tie up bundles, or be fed to animals Shoots allowed to grow two oryears could become poles for fencing, building, or making tool handles And of course, burned for firewood or made into charcoal In the Basque country they bent trees into the exact curve needed for shipbuilding, and let them grow for fifteen oryears.Far from harming the trees, this system gave them added vigor Constantly producing new wood kept them young, and coppiced and pollarded trees exist that are centuries old The harvested sprout wood was superior, as it was long and straight, and didn t need to be split The coppiced and pollarded woodlands werealive than dark, mature woods The sunlight that was able to come through the trees allowed a great variety of plants to grow underneath, which drew a great variety of animals The live tree roots remaining in the soil prevented erosion The people benefitted by having a steady supply of wood and forage.That was the short version, but there isIf all Mr Logan did was re introduce the world to the lost mechanics of coppicing and pollarding, the book would be interesting and informative But there isHe writes like a man in love He goes into raptures about the wonder of trees, which adapt to poor growing conditions by wiggling their shoots around like spaghetti until they find a shaft of sunlight, or when knocked down, turning any old branch into a leader, or a whole new tree.He also rhapsodizes about the social implications of the sproutlands Sproutlands were often common land, and community norms regulated when and how much wood could be harvested When people avoided greed, the whole community prospered The sproutlands were a way of life in which people lived in harmony with nature, listening to its rhythms, not trampling over it Treating trees well, and treating our fellow human beings well go hand in hand.Mr Logan s interest in pollarding began when, as a working arborist, he was asked to pollard some plane trees in the garden of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City He did, but with anxiety that his deep pruning would kill the trees He didn t know what he was doing, since pollarding was a lost art, so he sought out experts There were very few, but he traveled the world interviewing the Basque, the Norwegians, the Japanese, and the basket weaving Native Americans of California What he learned changed his outlook on life, and it may have changed mine I have often looked on the suckering habit of trees in my garden as an annoyance, and already I am thinking of it as a wonder and a gift


  2. Jim Angstadt Jim Angstadt says:

    Sprout Lands Tending the Endless Gift of TreesWilliam Bryant LoganThis is an enjoyable read that helps us understand the potential roles for trees in our lives.The author starts off with a fairly lengthy discussion of tree pollarding This process has been a central part of tree management for much of known history For thousands of years prior to industrialization, people in many parts of the world used pollarding to gain the raw materials for fences, baskets, animal feed, and a variety of oth Sprout Lands Tending the Endless Gift of TreesWilliam Bryant LoganThis is an enjoyable read that helps us understand the potential roles for trees in our lives.The author starts off with a fairly lengthy discussion of tree pollarding This process has been a central part of tree management for much of known history For thousands of years prior to industrialization, people in many parts of the world used pollarding to gain the raw materials for fences, baskets, animal feed, and a variety of other uses It was an important part of agrarian life To get a quick understanding of tree pollarding, notice the two tree drawings on the book s front cover The upper drawing shows a tree that has just been pollarded The lower drawing show the same tree several years later Using this process, farmers can have a virtually endless supply of useful tree parts.Early man used fire effectively to prevent invasive species from overtaking managed trees The author gives several extended examples from around the world to illustrate effective land management.In the later part of the book, the author discusses the effects of industrialization and our drift away from a long term perspective on tree management He notes that in recent decades there has been renewed interest in along term sustainable interest in land and tree management In particular, he details some of the renewed interest in Japan, and other places, for the benefits of small areas of trees that are cared for throughout an urban area This is not about raw materials, butabout culture and values.It s easy to see how trees can improve our quality of life in some situations


  3. Correen Correen says:

    The author writes in detail about two processes pollarding and coppicing I did to the meaning of either term or that a copse was a coppiced forest and was delighted to learn Pollarding involves cutting the tops off trees to create a fuller growth outward instead of upward With trees planted in a lie this creates a hedge Coppicing is cutting trees back to near ground level and encouraging sprouts to grow into full grown trees Both processes provide for a harvest of wood, very important to m The author writes in detail about two processes pollarding and coppicing I did to the meaning of either term or that a copse was a coppiced forest and was delighted to learn Pollarding involves cutting the tops off trees to create a fuller growth outward instead of upward With trees planted in a lie this creates a hedge Coppicing is cutting trees back to near ground level and encouraging sprouts to grow into full grown trees Both processes provide for a harvest of wood, very important to many growers.The book also covers other uses of trees for human and animal feed, hedge building, etc.I enjoyed the writing and found the topics interesting


  4. robyn robyn says:

    To read Tolkien and Lewis as a child is to believe that trees are magical Trees and the love of trees are strong throughout Tolkien s books, beginning with the mundane but beloved Party Tree, the tragic symbolism of the White Tree of Numenor, the stately and otherworldly mallorns, a nut of which Sam carries so carefully back to the Shire and then also the literally magical trees wicked Old Man Willow, the dangerous Huorns, the sentient Ents and their tree herds Go back far enough in Tolkien To read Tolkien and Lewis as a child is to believe that trees are magical Trees and the love of trees are strong throughout Tolkien s books, beginning with the mundane but beloved Party Tree, the tragic symbolism of the White Tree of Numenor, the stately and otherworldly mallorns, a nut of which Sam carries so carefully back to the Shire and then also the literally magical trees wicked Old Man Willow, the dangerous Huorns, the sentient Ents and their tree herds Go back far enough in Tolkien s work and you see that the sun and moon were originally trees, created by the gods.In Lewis you have the dryads and hamadryads tossing back their leafy hair at a Narnian party, partaking of dishes of various earths after reading that passage I never forgot, playing in the dirt, that every color, every different texture, might all taste different and be just as delightful to a tree as the things I m given at a party are to me.It s so easy to see when someone really loves trees Tolkien and Lewis wrote them into their stories as living creatures and invested their deaths with real sorrow.Logan loves trees too, and writes them as living creatures which, like Tolkien s Great Stories, don t ever really end And here s the truly magical thing there s no fantasy in this book, just unvarnished reality and deep knowledge and really really good writing I ve never read such a beautiful non fiction book Logan takes two subjects that NOBODY is talking about, coppicing and pollarding, and ties them to ecology, history, politics, geography, and to civilization and man s ability to thrive His book spans centuries and continents, and he makes a very convincing case for the best path forward for nature AND humanity being the two of us working together We are not better off without a diversity of wilderness close at hand The wilderness is not better off without a tempering hand That seems counterintuitive, but Logan proves that careful and knowledgeable tree husbandry increases the bio diversity of the region and the health and longevity of the trees, and illustrates it based on various cultures worldwide that abandoned coppicing only to return or try to return to it.What this book did was find beauty in the unbeautiful as well as in the sublime in the waste places and highways of the world, where trees struggle to find purchase Logan s description of a collection of weed trees growing under a viaduct beside a human waste processing plant borders on poetry and encouragement in the desolation that we ve left in too many places Given time and room to grow, nature will always let the jungle in I find hope in being reminded of that and also in being reminded that the best future isn t the absence of man, it s man as caretaker LOVE this book All the stars


  5. Craig Werner Craig Werner says:

    Another in the genre of nature books that has a couple of cool central ideas humans and trees need to cooperate with each other for about nine dozen reasons trees are a whole lot smarter than humans typically think but doesn t quite come together as a book There are several sections the fundamentals of coppice and pollard both now permanent parts of my conceptual and perceptual vocabularies the chapter on Native California and the sequence on Japan But there are a bunch of pieces that Another in the genre of nature books that has a couple of cool central ideas humans and trees need to cooperate with each other for about nine dozen reasons trees are a whole lot smarter than humans typically think but doesn t quite come together as a book There are several sections the fundamentals of coppice and pollard both now permanent parts of my conceptual and perceptual vocabularies the chapter on Native California and the sequence on Japan But there are a bunch of pieces that feel like unincorporated magazine articles and when Logan strays from trees to local color, I tended to lose interest Might have liked this better if I d read it before The Secret Life of Trees and Song of the Trees, but still happy to have read it


  6. Emily Emily says:

    trees are functionally immortal Coppice and pollard A method of harvesting wood that keeps the tree alive, usually much longer than they would in the wild Forests have been managed this way for many millennia in all parts of the world, and the human hand actually results inbiodiversity than wild forests A fascinating topic I had known nothing about before, but I would have preferred afocused and practical approach to the narrative.


  7. Scott Blackburn Scott Blackburn says:

    Wonderful prose and researched in a way that I love Logan brings his experience as a serious arborist, his considerable inquisitiveness, and an uncanny ability to bring fascinating histories to light The idea that trees are generous and foster abundance when humans work with them is simple, but fun to peruse I m going to add Logan s Air and Dirt to my list.


  8. Vishal Katariya Vishal Katariya says:

    How wonderful I learnt a lot about trees in this book William Bryant Logan talks about the two ancient tree regenerating practices that humans of the past used to procure the wood they needed These two practices are called pollarding and coppicing Both of these are a sustainable way of obtaining wood from a tree while leaving dormant buds alive These dormant buds then enable the tree to grow back to its original height in a few years Forests and groves that are well managed by humans harbo How wonderful I learnt a lot about trees in this book William Bryant Logan talks about the two ancient tree regenerating practices that humans of the past used to procure the wood they needed These two practices are called pollarding and coppicing Both of these are a sustainable way of obtaining wood from a tree while leaving dormant buds alive These dormant buds then enable the tree to grow back to its original height in a few years Forests and groves that are well managed by humans harbor greater biodiversity and variety than unmanaged ones There is a way to do this right, and Logan tells us how It s inspiring, and often beautiful The writing is also good lots of personal anecdotes and trips to various parts of the world to see how natives have been managing their trees Some people, thankfully, are now hearkening back to these not so ancient practices in an effort to sustainably manage their trees and extract benefits from them too


  9. chris chris says:

    Lovely but seriously flawedThis book is full of reverie and wonder about trees and our relationships to them Fascinating little dips into botany and plant morphology and arboriculture The author s personal narrative of exploring various histories of coppicing and pollarding is compelling and well written It s mostly delightful to read, with a few rambly exceptions when the author attempts to grasp and explain complex land based cultures in Japan and Sierra Leone He fared better, in my mind, Lovely but seriously flawedThis book is full of reverie and wonder about trees and our relationships to them Fascinating little dips into botany and plant morphology and arboriculture The author s personal narrative of exploring various histories of coppicing and pollarding is compelling and well written It s mostly delightful to read, with a few rambly exceptions when the author attempts to grasp and explain complex land based cultures in Japan and Sierra Leone He fared better, in my mind, in Norway and England and Basque Country and Northern California Do you see a trend But I have to add this caveat the book is so, so narrow minded, blinkered in imagination by its author s perspective and position as a white straight man in the U.S The book opens ominously, with an epigraph by Edgar Anderson using what should be obviously racist words From here on, the narration reveals itself to be cluelessly orientalist and casually male centric, Christian centric, and hetero centric This has the effect of constantly reminding the reader that the author imagines white, straight, Christian men to be the sole protagonists of history In some ways this makes it feel like a relic of the 19th century In addition, and perhaps for the same reasons, the book is relentlessly apolitical, stunningly so given the state of ecological destruction in 2019 Maybe I m asking for too much but in a field where so many others Solnit, McPhee, Kimmerer, to name a few have written passionately and politically about human relationships with plants and ecosystems, I don t feel I can overlook these shortcomings


  10. Stephen Stephen says:

    Lovely book about the lives of trees and the human cultures that depend on trees, live in symbiosis and harmony with them Describes practices like coppicing and pollarding that made trees a truly renewable resource, almost immortal One chapter is about Indians living in what is now California who had no need for metal or pottery They cooked in baskets so tightly woven of thin wood as to be watertight Put in grain, water, a very hot stone and presto bubbling hot gruel Memorable section on Ba Lovely book about the lives of trees and the human cultures that depend on trees, live in symbiosis and harmony with them Describes practices like coppicing and pollarding that made trees a truly renewable resource, almost immortal One chapter is about Indians living in what is now California who had no need for metal or pottery They cooked in baskets so tightly woven of thin wood as to be watertight Put in grain, water, a very hot stone and presto bubbling hot gruel Memorable section on Basque forestry and land use, how trees shape a human community The power of trees to restore landscape, either as volunteers or under the care of a master, is another theme I was struck with the description of the re wooding by weed trees of Gerritsen Beach in Staten Island, near the gigantic now closed trash landfill at Fresh Kills My great x8 grandfather, Gerrit Jansen van Oldenburg, owned land around there Gerritsen Beach has to be named for his son Jan Gerritsen baptized 1642.The tree spirit in this book showed itself to me this week A month ago I had cut down a volunteer mulberry tree that was breaking the edge of a storage shed roof and bucked the 8 diameter trunk Last week, going to take away the segments, I found each had little green sprouts coming out of it Wood is another miracle


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10 thoughts on “Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees

  1. Cheryl Gatling Cheryl Gatling says:

    The short version is that this is a book about coppicing and pollarding, techniques for managing forests that were once nearly universal, and are now almost completely forgotten.In coppicing, young trees are cut down, and then they spring back by sending up many straight shoots from the roots In pollarding, the tree is allowed to grow a sturdy trunk, but the branches are cut off Again, the branches send out many small shoots These shoots can be harvested, year after year, without killing the The short version is that this is a book about coppicing and pollarding, techniques for managing forests that were once nearly universal, and are now almost completely forgotten.In coppicing, young trees are cut down, and then they spring back by sending up many straight shoots from the roots In pollarding, the tree is allowed to grow a sturdy trunk, but the branches are cut off Again, the branches send out many small shoots These shoots can be harvested, year after year, without killing the tree Shoots harvested after one year would be whippy, flexible sticks that could be used to make baskets, or tie up bundles, or be fed to animals Shoots allowed to grow two oryears could become poles for fencing, building, or making tool handles And of course, burned for firewood or made into charcoal In the Basque country they bent trees into the exact curve needed for shipbuilding, and let them grow for fifteen oryears.Far from harming the trees, this system gave them added vigor Constantly producing new wood kept them young, and coppiced and pollarded trees exist that are centuries old The harvested sprout wood was superior, as it was long and straight, and didn t need to be split The coppiced and pollarded woodlands werealive than dark, mature woods The sunlight that was able to come through the trees allowed a great variety of plants to grow underneath, which drew a great variety of animals The live tree roots remaining in the soil prevented erosion The people benefitted by having a steady supply of wood and forage.That was the short version, but there isIf all Mr Logan did was re introduce the world to the lost mechanics of coppicing and pollarding, the book would be interesting and informative But there isHe writes like a man in love He goes into raptures about the wonder of trees, which adapt to poor growing conditions by wiggling their shoots around like spaghetti until they find a shaft of sunlight, or when knocked down, turning any old branch into a leader, or a whole new tree.He also rhapsodizes about the social implications of the sproutlands Sproutlands were often common land, and community norms regulated when and how much wood could be harvested When people avoided greed, the whole community prospered The sproutlands were a way of life in which people lived in harmony with nature, listening to its rhythms, not trampling over it Treating trees well, and treating our fellow human beings well go hand in hand.Mr Logan s interest in pollarding began when, as a working arborist, he was asked to pollard some plane trees in the garden of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City He did, but with anxiety that his deep pruning would kill the trees He didn t know what he was doing, since pollarding was a lost art, so he sought out experts There were very few, but he traveled the world interviewing the Basque, the Norwegians, the Japanese, and the basket weaving Native Americans of California What he learned changed his outlook on life, and it may have changed mine I have often looked on the suckering habit of trees in my garden as an annoyance, and already I am thinking of it as a wonder and a gift


  2. Jim Angstadt Jim Angstadt says:

    Sprout Lands Tending the Endless Gift of TreesWilliam Bryant LoganThis is an enjoyable read that helps us understand the potential roles for trees in our lives.The author starts off with a fairly lengthy discussion of tree pollarding This process has been a central part of tree management for much of known history For thousands of years prior to industrialization, people in many parts of the world used pollarding to gain the raw materials for fences, baskets, animal feed, and a variety of oth Sprout Lands Tending the Endless Gift of TreesWilliam Bryant LoganThis is an enjoyable read that helps us understand the potential roles for trees in our lives.The author starts off with a fairly lengthy discussion of tree pollarding This process has been a central part of tree management for much of known history For thousands of years prior to industrialization, people in many parts of the world used pollarding to gain the raw materials for fences, baskets, animal feed, and a variety of other uses It was an important part of agrarian life To get a quick understanding of tree pollarding, notice the two tree drawings on the book s front cover The upper drawing shows a tree that has just been pollarded The lower drawing show the same tree several years later Using this process, farmers can have a virtually endless supply of useful tree parts.Early man used fire effectively to prevent invasive species from overtaking managed trees The author gives several extended examples from around the world to illustrate effective land management.In the later part of the book, the author discusses the effects of industrialization and our drift away from a long term perspective on tree management He notes that in recent decades there has been renewed interest in along term sustainable interest in land and tree management In particular, he details some of the renewed interest in Japan, and other places, for the benefits of small areas of trees that are cared for throughout an urban area This is not about raw materials, butabout culture and values.It s easy to see how trees can improve our quality of life in some situations


  3. Correen Correen says:

    The author writes in detail about two processes pollarding and coppicing I did to the meaning of either term or that a copse was a coppiced forest and was delighted to learn Pollarding involves cutting the tops off trees to create a fuller growth outward instead of upward With trees planted in a lie this creates a hedge Coppicing is cutting trees back to near ground level and encouraging sprouts to grow into full grown trees Both processes provide for a harvest of wood, very important to m The author writes in detail about two processes pollarding and coppicing I did to the meaning of either term or that a copse was a coppiced forest and was delighted to learn Pollarding involves cutting the tops off trees to create a fuller growth outward instead of upward With trees planted in a lie this creates a hedge Coppicing is cutting trees back to near ground level and encouraging sprouts to grow into full grown trees Both processes provide for a harvest of wood, very important to many growers.The book also covers other uses of trees for human and animal feed, hedge building, etc.I enjoyed the writing and found the topics interesting


  4. robyn robyn says:

    To read Tolkien and Lewis as a child is to believe that trees are magical Trees and the love of trees are strong throughout Tolkien s books, beginning with the mundane but beloved Party Tree, the tragic symbolism of the White Tree of Numenor, the stately and otherworldly mallorns, a nut of which Sam carries so carefully back to the Shire and then also the literally magical trees wicked Old Man Willow, the dangerous Huorns, the sentient Ents and their tree herds Go back far enough in Tolkien To read Tolkien and Lewis as a child is to believe that trees are magical Trees and the love of trees are strong throughout Tolkien s books, beginning with the mundane but beloved Party Tree, the tragic symbolism of the White Tree of Numenor, the stately and otherworldly mallorns, a nut of which Sam carries so carefully back to the Shire and then also the literally magical trees wicked Old Man Willow, the dangerous Huorns, the sentient Ents and their tree herds Go back far enough in Tolkien s work and you see that the sun and moon were originally trees, created by the gods.In Lewis you have the dryads and hamadryads tossing back their leafy hair at a Narnian party, partaking of dishes of various earths after reading that passage I never forgot, playing in the dirt, that every color, every different texture, might all taste different and be just as delightful to a tree as the things I m given at a party are to me.It s so easy to see when someone really loves trees Tolkien and Lewis wrote them into their stories as living creatures and invested their deaths with real sorrow.Logan loves trees too, and writes them as living creatures which, like Tolkien s Great Stories, don t ever really end And here s the truly magical thing there s no fantasy in this book, just unvarnished reality and deep knowledge and really really good writing I ve never read such a beautiful non fiction book Logan takes two subjects that NOBODY is talking about, coppicing and pollarding, and ties them to ecology, history, politics, geography, and to civilization and man s ability to thrive His book spans centuries and continents, and he makes a very convincing case for the best path forward for nature AND humanity being the two of us working together We are not better off without a diversity of wilderness close at hand The wilderness is not better off without a tempering hand That seems counterintuitive, but Logan proves that careful and knowledgeable tree husbandry increases the bio diversity of the region and the health and longevity of the trees, and illustrates it based on various cultures worldwide that abandoned coppicing only to return or try to return to it.What this book did was find beauty in the unbeautiful as well as in the sublime in the waste places and highways of the world, where trees struggle to find purchase Logan s description of a collection of weed trees growing under a viaduct beside a human waste processing plant borders on poetry and encouragement in the desolation that we ve left in too many places Given time and room to grow, nature will always let the jungle in I find hope in being reminded of that and also in being reminded that the best future isn t the absence of man, it s man as caretaker LOVE this book All the stars


  5. Craig Werner Craig Werner says:

    Another in the genre of nature books that has a couple of cool central ideas humans and trees need to cooperate with each other for about nine dozen reasons trees are a whole lot smarter than humans typically think but doesn t quite come together as a book There are several sections the fundamentals of coppice and pollard both now permanent parts of my conceptual and perceptual vocabularies the chapter on Native California and the sequence on Japan But there are a bunch of pieces that Another in the genre of nature books that has a couple of cool central ideas humans and trees need to cooperate with each other for about nine dozen reasons trees are a whole lot smarter than humans typically think but doesn t quite come together as a book There are several sections the fundamentals of coppice and pollard both now permanent parts of my conceptual and perceptual vocabularies the chapter on Native California and the sequence on Japan But there are a bunch of pieces that feel like unincorporated magazine articles and when Logan strays from trees to local color, I tended to lose interest Might have liked this better if I d read it before The Secret Life of Trees and Song of the Trees, but still happy to have read it


  6. Emily Emily says:

    trees are functionally immortal Coppice and pollard A method of harvesting wood that keeps the tree alive, usually much longer than they would in the wild Forests have been managed this way for many millennia in all parts of the world, and the human hand actually results inbiodiversity than wild forests A fascinating topic I had known nothing about before, but I would have preferred afocused and practical approach to the narrative.


  7. Scott Blackburn Scott Blackburn says:

    Wonderful prose and researched in a way that I love Logan brings his experience as a serious arborist, his considerable inquisitiveness, and an uncanny ability to bring fascinating histories to light The idea that trees are generous and foster abundance when humans work with them is simple, but fun to peruse I m going to add Logan s Air and Dirt to my list.


  8. Vishal Katariya Vishal Katariya says:

    How wonderful I learnt a lot about trees in this book William Bryant Logan talks about the two ancient tree regenerating practices that humans of the past used to procure the wood they needed These two practices are called pollarding and coppicing Both of these are a sustainable way of obtaining wood from a tree while leaving dormant buds alive These dormant buds then enable the tree to grow back to its original height in a few years Forests and groves that are well managed by humans harbo How wonderful I learnt a lot about trees in this book William Bryant Logan talks about the two ancient tree regenerating practices that humans of the past used to procure the wood they needed These two practices are called pollarding and coppicing Both of these are a sustainable way of obtaining wood from a tree while leaving dormant buds alive These dormant buds then enable the tree to grow back to its original height in a few years Forests and groves that are well managed by humans harbor greater biodiversity and variety than unmanaged ones There is a way to do this right, and Logan tells us how It s inspiring, and often beautiful The writing is also good lots of personal anecdotes and trips to various parts of the world to see how natives have been managing their trees Some people, thankfully, are now hearkening back to these not so ancient practices in an effort to sustainably manage their trees and extract benefits from them too


  9. chris chris says:

    Lovely but seriously flawedThis book is full of reverie and wonder about trees and our relationships to them Fascinating little dips into botany and plant morphology and arboriculture The author s personal narrative of exploring various histories of coppicing and pollarding is compelling and well written It s mostly delightful to read, with a few rambly exceptions when the author attempts to grasp and explain complex land based cultures in Japan and Sierra Leone He fared better, in my mind, Lovely but seriously flawedThis book is full of reverie and wonder about trees and our relationships to them Fascinating little dips into botany and plant morphology and arboriculture The author s personal narrative of exploring various histories of coppicing and pollarding is compelling and well written It s mostly delightful to read, with a few rambly exceptions when the author attempts to grasp and explain complex land based cultures in Japan and Sierra Leone He fared better, in my mind, in Norway and England and Basque Country and Northern California Do you see a trend But I have to add this caveat the book is so, so narrow minded, blinkered in imagination by its author s perspective and position as a white straight man in the U.S The book opens ominously, with an epigraph by Edgar Anderson using what should be obviously racist words From here on, the narration reveals itself to be cluelessly orientalist and casually male centric, Christian centric, and hetero centric This has the effect of constantly reminding the reader that the author imagines white, straight, Christian men to be the sole protagonists of history In some ways this makes it feel like a relic of the 19th century In addition, and perhaps for the same reasons, the book is relentlessly apolitical, stunningly so given the state of ecological destruction in 2019 Maybe I m asking for too much but in a field where so many others Solnit, McPhee, Kimmerer, to name a few have written passionately and politically about human relationships with plants and ecosystems, I don t feel I can overlook these shortcomings


  10. Stephen Stephen says:

    Lovely book about the lives of trees and the human cultures that depend on trees, live in symbiosis and harmony with them Describes practices like coppicing and pollarding that made trees a truly renewable resource, almost immortal One chapter is about Indians living in what is now California who had no need for metal or pottery They cooked in baskets so tightly woven of thin wood as to be watertight Put in grain, water, a very hot stone and presto bubbling hot gruel Memorable section on Ba Lovely book about the lives of trees and the human cultures that depend on trees, live in symbiosis and harmony with them Describes practices like coppicing and pollarding that made trees a truly renewable resource, almost immortal One chapter is about Indians living in what is now California who had no need for metal or pottery They cooked in baskets so tightly woven of thin wood as to be watertight Put in grain, water, a very hot stone and presto bubbling hot gruel Memorable section on Basque forestry and land use, how trees shape a human community The power of trees to restore landscape, either as volunteers or under the care of a master, is another theme I was struck with the description of the re wooding by weed trees of Gerritsen Beach in Staten Island, near the gigantic now closed trash landfill at Fresh Kills My great x8 grandfather, Gerrit Jansen van Oldenburg, owned land around there Gerritsen Beach has to be named for his son Jan Gerritsen baptized 1642.The tree spirit in this book showed itself to me this week A month ago I had cut down a volunteer mulberry tree that was breaking the edge of a storage shed roof and bucked the 8 diameter trunk Last week, going to take away the segments, I found each had little green sprouts coming out of it Wood is another miracle


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *