The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet

The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet ePUB ´


The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet ❰Ebook❯ ➨ The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet Author Jeff Kosseff – Polishdarling.co.uk This book examines the history and future of Section of the Communications Decency Act, which provides websites extraordinary legal immunity for user generated content and is responsible for the mode This book examines Words That PDF Å the history and future of Sectionof the Communications Decency Act, which provides websites extraordinary legal immunity for user generated content and is responsible for the modern Internet in the United States.

  • ebook
  • The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet
  • Jeff Kosseff
  • 17 June 2018
  • 1501735799

About the Author: Jeff Kosseff

Is a well Words That PDF Å known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Twenty Six Words That Created the Internet book, this is one of the most wanted Jeff The Twenty-Six ePUB Ù Kosseff author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet

  1. Nicolaus Stengl Nicolaus Stengl says:

    An excellent legal, cultural, and historical analysis of a single sentence, one which is evenrelevant today No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider Here we read about the obscenity laws of the 20th century, the early days of the Internet, and thus also the ways and means by which disinformation can be spread.

  2. Jacob Mainwaring Jacob Mainwaring says:

    I didn t finish but was able to get the main takeaway The book goes into great detail about the history and future of section 230 of the communications decency act, which regards internet platforms as distributors, rather than publishers, of content In other words, they are seenas phone companies than as newspapers, which means they are not liable for the information posted on their sites The goal of this clause was to encourage platforms to moderate and remove objectionable obscene con I didn t finish but was able to get the main takeaway The book goes into great detail about the history and future of section 230 of the communications decency act, which regards internet platforms as distributors, rather than publishers, of content In other words, they are seenas phone companies than as newspapers, which means they are not liable for the information posted on their sites The goal of this clause was to encourage platforms to moderate and remove objectionable obscene content Without it, platforms would be discouraged from any moderation, because even the slightest tipping of the scale could change their legal status from distributor to publisher and make them liable In fact, the author argues that the Internet never would have blossomed into what it is without it Nearly 25 years later, some new questions arise should a platform be held liable if they have significant influence over which posts people see, as Twitter and Facebook do Does it matter if curation is done algorithmically These are questions we will continue to grapple with as the internet plays aimportant role in our lives

  3. Jon Jon says:

    Not sure what I was hoping for when I got this book, but it wasn t what I expected not necessarily a bad thing A detailed summary of how federal legal protection was provided to companies web sites protecting them from content posted by others and how that created both a surge in internet use and a myriad of so far unsolved problems The book may be a little too exhaustive in outlining the relevant cases all of this ended up in court I could ve usedconcise summaries, especiall Not sure what I was hoping for when I got this book, but it wasn t what I expected not necessarily a bad thing A detailed summary of how federal legal protection was provided to companies web sites protecting them from content posted by others and how that created both a surge in internet use and a myriad of so far unsolved problems The book may be a little too exhaustive in outlining the relevant cases all of this ended up in court I could ve usedconcise summaries, especially once it became clear where most of this was going And it clearly highlights the conflict with legal protections for a business, free speech and the serious damage that sometimes visits on people Victims of false identification, vengeful ex lovers, hyper critical customers, etc all end up coming away with basically nothing But without the protections, the internet wouldn t be what it is That might not be such a bad thing

  4. Mike Warren Mike Warren says:

    The Internet has transformed our lives and upended American commerce As it functions in the Untied States, the Internet is likely the greatest platform for free speech in the history of the world Websites like Facebook and Twitter have changed, for better or worse, how we interact with each other, and digital marketplaces like , eBay and Spotify have put a remarkably wide range of products and services at our fingertips None of this, argues Jeff Kosseff, would have been possible without The Internet has transformed our lives and upended American commerce As it functions in the Untied States, the Internet is likely the greatest platform for free speech in the history of the world Websites like Facebook and Twitter have changed, for better or worse, how we interact with each other, and digital marketplaces like , eBay and Spotify have put a remarkably wide range of products and services at our fingertips None of this, argues Jeff Kosseff, would have been possible without a 26 word clause that was tucked into the federal Communications Decency Act CDA that was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996.Section 230, the 26 words at the heart of Mr Kosseff s book, was little noticed when the CDA was passed in 1996 This somewhat obscure clause was overshadowed by the discussion of the full CDA, which was primarily focused on regulating online pornography It didn t take long, however, for ecommerce companies to learn and appreciate the significance of the broad immunity that Section 230 gave them against liability claims related to third party content Simply stated, without Section 230 the types of third party content that has become commonplace on Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, andeither wouldn t exist, or it would be severely restricted And this third party content has become the backbone of the modern day Internet As Ms Kosseff observes, most of the top ten websites in the U.S rely either entirely or significantly on third party content Section 230 was the brainchild of two Congressman, one Republican and one Democrat, who were concerned about the potential for a recent court decision to stifle the free speech potential of the Internet.In the mid 90s, partisanship in Congress had reached the point that Democrats and Republicans refused to sit at the same tables in the Congressional dining hall, but Chris Cox, a House Republican from California and Ron Wyden, a House Democrat from Oregon, were an exception Cox would go on to head the SEC under President George W Bush, and Wyden now serves as the senior Senator from Oregon, but it is their role in developing and championing Section 230 that will likely stand as their most significant contribution to U.S statesmanship Both men were concerned about a court ruling that had been issued in May of 1995 in a case known as Stratton Oakmont v Prodigy In that case, Daniel Porush, the president of the Stratton Oakmont brokerage firm, sued Prodigy, one of the earliest online services, for defamatory information that had been posted about him and Stratton Oakmont by a third party user on one of Prodigy s chat forums Even though Prodigy was littlethan a neutral intermediary, they had made marketing claims that they moderated their chat forums Using this attempt at moderation as its cudgel, the court ruled in favor of Porush and Stratton Oakmont Cox and Wyden were concerned about the chilling effect this ruling could have on the Internet s ability to become a functional and open forum for free speech They felt it was good public policy to encourage companies that operated online forums to moderate their user content, but the Stratton Oakmont decision demonstrated that, unless these companies were able to achieve an arbitrary and unreasonable standard of content moderation, they could be punished for their failures, which offered a perverse incentive for companies to take a completely hands off approach to user content The CDA was already working its way through Congress, and they saw an opportunity to insert what would become Section 230 into the legislation Surprisingly, Section 230 was drafted and passed with very little input from the tech industry Companies like Google and Facebook now have an army of lobbyists roaming the corridors of Congress, but the legislation that enabled their business models and made them the companies they are today became law almost entirely through the work of a group of people who wanted nothingthan to allow the Internet to achieve its latent potential as a robust and open forum for the exchange of ideas The book is divided into four sections the creation of Section 230, the rise of Section 230, the gradual erosion of Section 230 and the future of Section 230 The story is mostly told through the court cases that shaped and defined Section 230, and these vignettes make the book seem like a series of interconnected short stories The author does a good job of making legal principles and issues accessible to a general audience, but he doesn t have much of a flair for storytelling The book is informative, but the prose is somewhat dry Much of this book reads like a law school textbook The author does an outstanding job of remaining neutral about his topic He admits that he is a fan and advocate of Section 230, but he fully understands and articulates the problems with Section 230 Many companies have used this law to shield them from negligent and egregious behavior The victims in these lawsuits frequently suffer real and serious damages Reputations and livelihoods have been ruined, and, in many cases, it is clear the defendants could have doneto prevent these damages Yet, the broad immunity of Section 230 effectively gives them a get out of jail free card, and the author doesn t pull any punches in his criticism of how Section 230 sometimes allows bad things to happen to innocent people Ultimately, however, this is a feel good story It explains how a bipartisan Congress created legislation that allowed a nascent industry to flourish and provided U.S citizens with the full benefits of the Internet Jeff Kosseff has written a well reasoned, informative book that helps us to appreciate how well our system can work when it functions as it should

  5. Kevin Jennings Kevin Jennings says:

    This was a great review of the Section 230 part of the law the governs the internet It basically explains why exists, what its implications are and what are its limits Really great if you are interested in what free speech on the internet means Literal Goodreads could not exist without Section 230 and I wouldn t be writing any reviews anywhere on the internet without it either.

  6. Riley Holmes Riley Holmes says:

    Interesting exposition of various important court cases related to freedom of speech and liability in the early days of the internet.

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10 thoughts on “The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet

  1. Nicolaus Stengl Nicolaus Stengl says:

    An excellent legal, cultural, and historical analysis of a single sentence, one which is evenrelevant today No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider Here we read about the obscenity laws of the 20th century, the early days of the Internet, and thus also the ways and means by which disinformation can be spread.


  2. Jacob Mainwaring Jacob Mainwaring says:

    I didn t finish but was able to get the main takeaway The book goes into great detail about the history and future of section 230 of the communications decency act, which regards internet platforms as distributors, rather than publishers, of content In other words, they are seenas phone companies than as newspapers, which means they are not liable for the information posted on their sites The goal of this clause was to encourage platforms to moderate and remove objectionable obscene con I didn t finish but was able to get the main takeaway The book goes into great detail about the history and future of section 230 of the communications decency act, which regards internet platforms as distributors, rather than publishers, of content In other words, they are seenas phone companies than as newspapers, which means they are not liable for the information posted on their sites The goal of this clause was to encourage platforms to moderate and remove objectionable obscene content Without it, platforms would be discouraged from any moderation, because even the slightest tipping of the scale could change their legal status from distributor to publisher and make them liable In fact, the author argues that the Internet never would have blossomed into what it is without it Nearly 25 years later, some new questions arise should a platform be held liable if they have significant influence over which posts people see, as Twitter and Facebook do Does it matter if curation is done algorithmically These are questions we will continue to grapple with as the internet plays aimportant role in our lives


  3. Jon Jon says:

    Not sure what I was hoping for when I got this book, but it wasn t what I expected not necessarily a bad thing A detailed summary of how federal legal protection was provided to companies web sites protecting them from content posted by others and how that created both a surge in internet use and a myriad of so far unsolved problems The book may be a little too exhaustive in outlining the relevant cases all of this ended up in court I could ve usedconcise summaries, especiall Not sure what I was hoping for when I got this book, but it wasn t what I expected not necessarily a bad thing A detailed summary of how federal legal protection was provided to companies web sites protecting them from content posted by others and how that created both a surge in internet use and a myriad of so far unsolved problems The book may be a little too exhaustive in outlining the relevant cases all of this ended up in court I could ve usedconcise summaries, especially once it became clear where most of this was going And it clearly highlights the conflict with legal protections for a business, free speech and the serious damage that sometimes visits on people Victims of false identification, vengeful ex lovers, hyper critical customers, etc all end up coming away with basically nothing But without the protections, the internet wouldn t be what it is That might not be such a bad thing


  4. Mike Warren Mike Warren says:

    The Internet has transformed our lives and upended American commerce As it functions in the Untied States, the Internet is likely the greatest platform for free speech in the history of the world Websites like Facebook and Twitter have changed, for better or worse, how we interact with each other, and digital marketplaces like , eBay and Spotify have put a remarkably wide range of products and services at our fingertips None of this, argues Jeff Kosseff, would have been possible without The Internet has transformed our lives and upended American commerce As it functions in the Untied States, the Internet is likely the greatest platform for free speech in the history of the world Websites like Facebook and Twitter have changed, for better or worse, how we interact with each other, and digital marketplaces like , eBay and Spotify have put a remarkably wide range of products and services at our fingertips None of this, argues Jeff Kosseff, would have been possible without a 26 word clause that was tucked into the federal Communications Decency Act CDA that was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1996.Section 230, the 26 words at the heart of Mr Kosseff s book, was little noticed when the CDA was passed in 1996 This somewhat obscure clause was overshadowed by the discussion of the full CDA, which was primarily focused on regulating online pornography It didn t take long, however, for ecommerce companies to learn and appreciate the significance of the broad immunity that Section 230 gave them against liability claims related to third party content Simply stated, without Section 230 the types of third party content that has become commonplace on Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, andeither wouldn t exist, or it would be severely restricted And this third party content has become the backbone of the modern day Internet As Ms Kosseff observes, most of the top ten websites in the U.S rely either entirely or significantly on third party content Section 230 was the brainchild of two Congressman, one Republican and one Democrat, who were concerned about the potential for a recent court decision to stifle the free speech potential of the Internet.In the mid 90s, partisanship in Congress had reached the point that Democrats and Republicans refused to sit at the same tables in the Congressional dining hall, but Chris Cox, a House Republican from California and Ron Wyden, a House Democrat from Oregon, were an exception Cox would go on to head the SEC under President George W Bush, and Wyden now serves as the senior Senator from Oregon, but it is their role in developing and championing Section 230 that will likely stand as their most significant contribution to U.S statesmanship Both men were concerned about a court ruling that had been issued in May of 1995 in a case known as Stratton Oakmont v Prodigy In that case, Daniel Porush, the president of the Stratton Oakmont brokerage firm, sued Prodigy, one of the earliest online services, for defamatory information that had been posted about him and Stratton Oakmont by a third party user on one of Prodigy s chat forums Even though Prodigy was littlethan a neutral intermediary, they had made marketing claims that they moderated their chat forums Using this attempt at moderation as its cudgel, the court ruled in favor of Porush and Stratton Oakmont Cox and Wyden were concerned about the chilling effect this ruling could have on the Internet s ability to become a functional and open forum for free speech They felt it was good public policy to encourage companies that operated online forums to moderate their user content, but the Stratton Oakmont decision demonstrated that, unless these companies were able to achieve an arbitrary and unreasonable standard of content moderation, they could be punished for their failures, which offered a perverse incentive for companies to take a completely hands off approach to user content The CDA was already working its way through Congress, and they saw an opportunity to insert what would become Section 230 into the legislation Surprisingly, Section 230 was drafted and passed with very little input from the tech industry Companies like Google and Facebook now have an army of lobbyists roaming the corridors of Congress, but the legislation that enabled their business models and made them the companies they are today became law almost entirely through the work of a group of people who wanted nothingthan to allow the Internet to achieve its latent potential as a robust and open forum for the exchange of ideas The book is divided into four sections the creation of Section 230, the rise of Section 230, the gradual erosion of Section 230 and the future of Section 230 The story is mostly told through the court cases that shaped and defined Section 230, and these vignettes make the book seem like a series of interconnected short stories The author does a good job of making legal principles and issues accessible to a general audience, but he doesn t have much of a flair for storytelling The book is informative, but the prose is somewhat dry Much of this book reads like a law school textbook The author does an outstanding job of remaining neutral about his topic He admits that he is a fan and advocate of Section 230, but he fully understands and articulates the problems with Section 230 Many companies have used this law to shield them from negligent and egregious behavior The victims in these lawsuits frequently suffer real and serious damages Reputations and livelihoods have been ruined, and, in many cases, it is clear the defendants could have doneto prevent these damages Yet, the broad immunity of Section 230 effectively gives them a get out of jail free card, and the author doesn t pull any punches in his criticism of how Section 230 sometimes allows bad things to happen to innocent people Ultimately, however, this is a feel good story It explains how a bipartisan Congress created legislation that allowed a nascent industry to flourish and provided U.S citizens with the full benefits of the Internet Jeff Kosseff has written a well reasoned, informative book that helps us to appreciate how well our system can work when it functions as it should


  5. Kevin Jennings Kevin Jennings says:

    This was a great review of the Section 230 part of the law the governs the internet It basically explains why exists, what its implications are and what are its limits Really great if you are interested in what free speech on the internet means Literal Goodreads could not exist without Section 230 and I wouldn t be writing any reviews anywhere on the internet without it either.


  6. Riley Holmes Riley Holmes says:

    Interesting exposition of various important court cases related to freedom of speech and liability in the early days of the internet.


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