This Is What I Want to Tell You

This Is What I Want to Tell You ePUB Ç What I Want to

This Is What I Want to Tell You ⚡ [PDF] ✍ This Is What I Want to Tell You By Heather Duffy Stone ✵ – Polishdarling.co.uk Friendship,love,and unexpected secrets

Nadio and his twin sister, Noelle, always had a unique bond And somehow, Keeley Shipley fit perfectly into their world But when Keeley spends the summ Friendship,love,and unexpected secrets Nadio What I PDF/EPUB ä and his twin sister, Noelle, always had a unique bond And somehow, Keeley Shipley fit perfectly into their world But when Keeley spends the summer in England, she comes home changed, haunted by a dark memory As she and Nadio fall in love, they try to hide it from Noelle, who's jealously guarding a secret of her own Slowly, a lifelong friendship begins to This Is PDF \ crack under the crushing weight of past trauma, guarded secrets, jealousy, obsessionand an unexpected love that could destroy them.


About the Author: Heather Duffy Stone

Heather is a counselor, What I PDF/EPUB ä a writer and a teacher and a traveler Right now she is beginning an adventure across the country and writing at least one book Her first novel, THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO TELL YOU, which is about falling in love for the first time and maybe getting a tattoo, was published by Flux in .



10 thoughts on “This Is What I Want to Tell You

  1. Steph (Reviewer X) Steph (Reviewer X) says:

    Cross-posted from my blog review .

    Woo, long review. Skip first three paragraphs (not counting this one) if you don't want a detailed description.

    Nadio and Noelle are twins, but when it comes to their friend Keeley, the trio are more like triplets--inseparable since forever. But then Keeley goes to Oxford with her parents for an entire summer and for some reason, everything between the three changes. Noelle wants nothing to do with Keeley and even though they promised each other they'd talk every day, every time Keeley emailed her, Noelle never replied. The day Keeley comes back from Oxford (which is when the book begins), Noelle isn't there (on purpose) to greet her. She's out with Jessica, her new friend, to a party, where she meets Parker.

    Meanwhile, Nadio comes back from his evening run and finds Keeley, who's recently returned from Oxford. He suddenly sees her in a new light, one thing leads to another, and the two end up kissing. This leads to a relationship between them, one that has its own issues, one they keep a secret from the ever-distancing Noelle. Noelle becomes enamored by Parker and he's her primary focus now that she doesn't have her two peers to keep her occupied.

    The book unfolds in a way that explores the growing spaces between Nadio and Keeley, and Noelle, and what led them there. Noelle is angry at Keeley for having everything so easy and for complaining that she doesn't want to go to Oxford, that she doesn't want this or that, that she just wants to stay home. Keeley is hiding something that happened in Oxford from the both of them that accounts for the change both notice in her. And Nadio is hiding his inner conflict with his absent father figure: Who is the man and how does he fit into Nadio's life?

    I know it doesn't seem like a lot happens in this book, or that it's nothing new. But the way things were spread out made me feel full at the end, like at the end of a satisfying meal. It's not what I would call a fun read, nor a light one. I wouldn't give it to any young readers who read up because this is the type of YA novel I just don't think they would get. And not because they are stupid, because they aren't--it's more that this wouldn't resonate with them, isn't relevant to them.

    Nor is it a read for every occasion. I wouldn't recommend reading it at any time you're feeling impulsive or on the go--calmness and patience go a long way into appreciating this. I had a lot of moments when I was nodding along with the narrative, thinking, That's it. That's totally it. (Although the voice was strange sometimes. Good strange. But strange all the same.) I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to pass this on to older readers and adults who enjoy YA.

    That said, this is one of the most offbeat books I've read in a long time. It's written in a way I haven't come across yet in YA--where there are no quotations marks in the dialogue. (Which, no, I didn't have any problems with. I don't mind quirks like this, and the whole textual silence correlated with the theme and accentuated the poignancy of the overall product.) The text is indented when the characters speak, but there's no stylistic divide between what's being said and the tag that follows it. This makes it so I had to really focus to keep up.

    Also, the writing just disappeared while I was reading. I don't know why, but there was no barrier between me and the characters and their lives. Seriously, this has never happened to me before, or if it has, I don't remember, which kind of defeats the purpose. I doubt I'll forget this, at any rate.

    One thing that's been bugging me, though, is this: Nadio and Noelle both had their own POVs, but what we saw of Keeley was only through the both of them. This didn't hinder her development, don't get me wrong, but it struck me odd when this was essentially their--the three of theirs--story. One possible explanation is this:

    Nadio and Noelle were conceived in Italy when their parents were seventeen and subsequently abandoned by their father. Their mom--Lace, as they call her--is supportive and present in their lives. Keeley's parents are scholars who place their academic life more than before her. In many ways, she felt like an antithesis to Nadio and Noelle; her and their lives were inversely proportional to each other. Where she has a lot of money, they had none. Where they have only one parent who goes the extra mile to fill empty paternal voids twice, she has two parents who are never there. Where they are twins, she is an only child . At one point Nadio refers to her as the sister without any siblings. So, maybe this was another one of the things one didn't have that the other two compensated for.

    In any rate, a most unusual novel. Literary, maybe, in a way. I have a feeling it'll stick with me.


  2. Sarah Sarah says:

    This Is What I Want to Tell You is a heartbreaking novel that stole my breath away as I read on through the night, the characters compelling me to finish their story without pause. At so many points in the novel I felt my chest constricting, my throat hurting like I wanted to cry but just couldn't. I was sad. I was angry. I was shocked. I was... butterflies. I found myself re-reading passages and pages just to take in the simultaneous pain and beauty of Heather Duffy Stone's words again and again. Told almost as a confessional in alternating viewpoints between 16-year-old twins Noelle and Nadio, This Is What I Want to Tell You is the story of all the things we want to say but can't -- the things we should've said but didn't. It's the story of once-impermeable bonds of friendship and loyalty stretching and breaking before our eyes, out of our control. It's the story of the loves and losses that shape our lives. But ultimately, This Is What I Want to Tell You is a story of survival; of finding that one reason to keep going. To love. To hope.


  3. Michelle Michelle says:

    Although I was fortunate enough to read an ARC of this book some time ago, I couldn't jump right in to give it a review. It made such an impression on me that I was afraid, am still afraid, that anything I say won't possibly do it justice.

    That said, I can't NOT review it, because it's a book that you could easily pass by. It looks like a lot of the YA books already out there. When you read the back, it even sounds like a lot of the YA books already out there. But trust me, this is a book unlike any other.

    This is What I Want to Tell You follows brother and sister Nadio and Noelle through the months after a summer vacation that changes everything. The return of their mutual best friend, Keeley, from a summer abroad sparks changes that were already simmering, prompting Nadio to write letters to his father that he never mails. Told in alternating points-of-view (Nadio and Noelle's), the book illustrates the power of friendship, family, and the invisible ties that bind us even to those who are long gone. But it does it all with such grace, such simplicity, that you're left KNOWING the book had a profound impact on you but not quite knowing why.

    My teenage daughter and her friend each devoured this book in under three hours straight. Yet, even as a 39-year-old, I can say that I will never, ever forget this book.


  4. Neesha Neesha says:

    This is one of those novels that, when I was finished, I wanted to hold it close and savor the little door it had opened for me. It's one of those books that makes me want to wait a long while before I open up another book because I don't want to lose the glow from this one. Some time back, I read a book called All Rivers Flow to the Sea by Alison McGhee and I felt the same way. That book has lodged itself deep inside me and THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO TELL YOU is doing the same thing.

    I don't know what to tell you about the plot because the whole book was like a string I was following in the dark. I just trusted the voice and the author to get me to the end. It was this quiet, powerful thing. It's True and vulnerable and tender and just . . . SO achingly beautiful. It's all heart, wrapped up in this package of gorgeous language. You are a true wordsmith, Heather Duffy Stone. I am a huge fan after reading this gem of a debut, and I look forward whatever you write next.


  5. Celise Celise says:

    Not even worth the hour or so it took to read this. Not good. There wasn't an interesting moment of this book, and nothing I didn't predict.

    This guy is so perfect and I can't stop thinking about him and he ignores me all the time. Asshole. Drugs. Drinking. Rape. Where else could this go?

    Also, the saying my skin stood up. Stone used it twice. What does that even mean?

    It's alright to not use quotation marks for dialogue in some cases. This was not one of those. It was horribly structured so at times it was hard to tell who was speaking, and if they were actually speaking, or thinking.


  6. Suzanne Suzanne says:

    A most unusual novel. Quiet and intense, two qualities enhanced by its stylistic silence, this is a book that grows, expands, by a millionfold from first page to last.


  7. Jasmine Diaz Jasmine Diaz says:

    This book is about a girl named noelle who has a twin brother and a best friend kellie who she preety much grew up with. They were all best friends until keelie went away on vacation because her parents had to do this book thing about the lord of the rings. Once she came back things between her and noelle drifted away. Noelle meet this guy parker at a party his arms were covered in tattos. Kellie began daiting Noelles twin brother but she had her own dark secreats to hide. She ended up getting raped by a guy she meet while she was on vacation he was suppose to be her boyfriend but hurt her. She told Noelles brother and he felt like he had to protect her. Noelle lost her virginity to parker and one night when she went to parkers house because he invited her to his house party he broke up with her. Noelle went crazy she yelled at a teacher in her class about her having her sunglasses on so she tld da teacher off. The teacher called her twin brother and her brother got Kellie and went inti a private room in the principals office she tld her brother off and kellie becaus they were hiding their relationship from her. They were in shock Noelle ran out of school went to her house and attempted to kill her self but didnt sucide because her brother and kellie found her before it was to late and took her to the emergency. When she gopt out she got her self a job at a bakery which cooking by the way parker loved doing so anyways shes working their and one day parker shows up out of no were and she notices his new tattos but she tells him she has to go back to work and so yup that preety much was a good bye. Noelle got a tattoo she felt like she needed her own story branded on her to


  8. Ari Noth Ari Noth says:

    Oh god, this book was just devastating. Its like the book should have a big red sticker that says, DO NOT READ IF YOU ARE A. SUICIDAL B. DEPRESSED C. ETC. I mean really. I didnt cry granted but I was like, OMFG WHY! Yeah, so not for those who are any of the listed above. Its a beautiful story. The dialog became a bit confusing here and there do to its unusual set up but all in all the book was just amazing. Okay so I did want to punch a few characters (hmm that seems to be a trend...) but I couldnt help it. Some of them were just simply infuriating. Okay and Ill admit I did look up a cookbook mentioned because Noelle said she wanted to learn what it was. So what judge me. I thought it was a date rape cookbook. Okay so I did become a little imaginative here and there but oh well. That was the beauty of the book. It left you wondering what it was that happened/what something was until the last chunk of the book. Gotta love books like that. Read it, I swear you wont regret it :) (unless or an A. B. or C.)


  9. Sab H. (YA Bliss) Sab H. (YA Bliss) says:

    This book was really interesting. It really explores the confusion we feel in our teen years and the problem with the secrets we keep in moments of confusion. I really enjoyed reading from Nadio's point of view, he was private, mysterious and fascinating. The story got to me because they were all so confused and uncertain, that I could relate. And we all tend to keep things inside us, unsaid.

    The writing was different, that felt nice. She uses dialog in an interesting way, but it did feel confusing at times. The plot was easy, it's a really short read. The characters were good, just regular teenagers with crappy problems. I always like books that explore the sibling relationship; in this case, Noelle and Nadio not only are sibling but twins. Which fascinates me.

    For some reason I love the cover. It has a lot to do with the book. If you're a confused teenager you should read this or if you enjoy light reads and teen issues this may be a book for you.


  10. Terry Terry says:

    Reading this reminded me a bit of Francesca Lia Block's The Hanged Man, minus the magical elements. Stone explores how relationships change because of jealousy, secrets, and just plain growing up in easy-to-read prose. Something dark tints everything as the plot unfolds and the characters present their version of Junior Year. Decisions about sex are explicit in the book, but I liked the way Stone made these momentous choices more about the way physicality changes - or doesn't change - the underlying nature of affection and connection between teens. This was a good, moody read that wasn't melodramatically over the top.


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10 thoughts on “This Is What I Want to Tell You

  1. Steph (Reviewer X) Steph (Reviewer X) says:

    Cross-posted from my blog review .

    Woo, long review. Skip first three paragraphs (not counting this one) if you don't want a detailed description.

    Nadio and Noelle are twins, but when it comes to their friend Keeley, the trio are more like triplets--inseparable since forever. But then Keeley goes to Oxford with her parents for an entire summer and for some reason, everything between the three changes. Noelle wants nothing to do with Keeley and even though they promised each other they'd talk every day, every time Keeley emailed her, Noelle never replied. The day Keeley comes back from Oxford (which is when the book begins), Noelle isn't there (on purpose) to greet her. She's out with Jessica, her new friend, to a party, where she meets Parker.

    Meanwhile, Nadio comes back from his evening run and finds Keeley, who's recently returned from Oxford. He suddenly sees her in a new light, one thing leads to another, and the two end up kissing. This leads to a relationship between them, one that has its own issues, one they keep a secret from the ever-distancing Noelle. Noelle becomes enamored by Parker and he's her primary focus now that she doesn't have her two peers to keep her occupied.

    The book unfolds in a way that explores the growing spaces between Nadio and Keeley, and Noelle, and what led them there. Noelle is angry at Keeley for having everything so easy and for complaining that she doesn't want to go to Oxford, that she doesn't want this or that, that she just wants to stay home. Keeley is hiding something that happened in Oxford from the both of them that accounts for the change both notice in her. And Nadio is hiding his inner conflict with his absent father figure: Who is the man and how does he fit into Nadio's life?

    I know it doesn't seem like a lot happens in this book, or that it's nothing new. But the way things were spread out made me feel full at the end, like at the end of a satisfying meal. It's not what I would call a fun read, nor a light one. I wouldn't give it to any young readers who read up because this is the type of YA novel I just don't think they would get. And not because they are stupid, because they aren't--it's more that this wouldn't resonate with them, isn't relevant to them.

    Nor is it a read for every occasion. I wouldn't recommend reading it at any time you're feeling impulsive or on the go--calmness and patience go a long way into appreciating this. I had a lot of moments when I was nodding along with the narrative, thinking, That's it. That's totally it. (Although the voice was strange sometimes. Good strange. But strange all the same.) I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to pass this on to older readers and adults who enjoy YA.

    That said, this is one of the most offbeat books I've read in a long time. It's written in a way I haven't come across yet in YA--where there are no quotations marks in the dialogue. (Which, no, I didn't have any problems with. I don't mind quirks like this, and the whole textual silence correlated with the theme and accentuated the poignancy of the overall product.) The text is indented when the characters speak, but there's no stylistic divide between what's being said and the tag that follows it. This makes it so I had to really focus to keep up.

    Also, the writing just disappeared while I was reading. I don't know why, but there was no barrier between me and the characters and their lives. Seriously, this has never happened to me before, or if it has, I don't remember, which kind of defeats the purpose. I doubt I'll forget this, at any rate.

    One thing that's been bugging me, though, is this: Nadio and Noelle both had their own POVs, but what we saw of Keeley was only through the both of them. This didn't hinder her development, don't get me wrong, but it struck me odd when this was essentially their--the three of theirs--story. One possible explanation is this:

    Nadio and Noelle were conceived in Italy when their parents were seventeen and subsequently abandoned by their father. Their mom--Lace, as they call her--is supportive and present in their lives. Keeley's parents are scholars who place their academic life more than before her. In many ways, she felt like an antithesis to Nadio and Noelle; her and their lives were inversely proportional to each other. Where she has a lot of money, they had none. Where they have only one parent who goes the extra mile to fill empty paternal voids twice, she has two parents who are never there. Where they are twins, she is an only child . At one point Nadio refers to her as the sister without any siblings. So, maybe this was another one of the things one didn't have that the other two compensated for.

    In any rate, a most unusual novel. Literary, maybe, in a way. I have a feeling it'll stick with me.


  2. Sarah Sarah says:

    This Is What I Want to Tell You is a heartbreaking novel that stole my breath away as I read on through the night, the characters compelling me to finish their story without pause. At so many points in the novel I felt my chest constricting, my throat hurting like I wanted to cry but just couldn't. I was sad. I was angry. I was shocked. I was... butterflies. I found myself re-reading passages and pages just to take in the simultaneous pain and beauty of Heather Duffy Stone's words again and again. Told almost as a confessional in alternating viewpoints between 16-year-old twins Noelle and Nadio, This Is What I Want to Tell You is the story of all the things we want to say but can't -- the things we should've said but didn't. It's the story of once-impermeable bonds of friendship and loyalty stretching and breaking before our eyes, out of our control. It's the story of the loves and losses that shape our lives. But ultimately, This Is What I Want to Tell You is a story of survival; of finding that one reason to keep going. To love. To hope.


  3. Michelle Michelle says:

    Although I was fortunate enough to read an ARC of this book some time ago, I couldn't jump right in to give it a review. It made such an impression on me that I was afraid, am still afraid, that anything I say won't possibly do it justice.

    That said, I can't NOT review it, because it's a book that you could easily pass by. It looks like a lot of the YA books already out there. When you read the back, it even sounds like a lot of the YA books already out there. But trust me, this is a book unlike any other.

    This is What I Want to Tell You follows brother and sister Nadio and Noelle through the months after a summer vacation that changes everything. The return of their mutual best friend, Keeley, from a summer abroad sparks changes that were already simmering, prompting Nadio to write letters to his father that he never mails. Told in alternating points-of-view (Nadio and Noelle's), the book illustrates the power of friendship, family, and the invisible ties that bind us even to those who are long gone. But it does it all with such grace, such simplicity, that you're left KNOWING the book had a profound impact on you but not quite knowing why.

    My teenage daughter and her friend each devoured this book in under three hours straight. Yet, even as a 39-year-old, I can say that I will never, ever forget this book.


  4. Neesha Neesha says:

    This is one of those novels that, when I was finished, I wanted to hold it close and savor the little door it had opened for me. It's one of those books that makes me want to wait a long while before I open up another book because I don't want to lose the glow from this one. Some time back, I read a book called All Rivers Flow to the Sea by Alison McGhee and I felt the same way. That book has lodged itself deep inside me and THIS IS WHAT I WANT TO TELL YOU is doing the same thing.

    I don't know what to tell you about the plot because the whole book was like a string I was following in the dark. I just trusted the voice and the author to get me to the end. It was this quiet, powerful thing. It's True and vulnerable and tender and just . . . SO achingly beautiful. It's all heart, wrapped up in this package of gorgeous language. You are a true wordsmith, Heather Duffy Stone. I am a huge fan after reading this gem of a debut, and I look forward whatever you write next.


  5. Celise Celise says:

    Not even worth the hour or so it took to read this. Not good. There wasn't an interesting moment of this book, and nothing I didn't predict.

    This guy is so perfect and I can't stop thinking about him and he ignores me all the time. Asshole. Drugs. Drinking. Rape. Where else could this go?

    Also, the saying my skin stood up. Stone used it twice. What does that even mean?

    It's alright to not use quotation marks for dialogue in some cases. This was not one of those. It was horribly structured so at times it was hard to tell who was speaking, and if they were actually speaking, or thinking.


  6. Suzanne Suzanne says:

    A most unusual novel. Quiet and intense, two qualities enhanced by its stylistic silence, this is a book that grows, expands, by a millionfold from first page to last.


  7. Jasmine Diaz Jasmine Diaz says:

    This book is about a girl named noelle who has a twin brother and a best friend kellie who she preety much grew up with. They were all best friends until keelie went away on vacation because her parents had to do this book thing about the lord of the rings. Once she came back things between her and noelle drifted away. Noelle meet this guy parker at a party his arms were covered in tattos. Kellie began daiting Noelles twin brother but she had her own dark secreats to hide. She ended up getting raped by a guy she meet while she was on vacation he was suppose to be her boyfriend but hurt her. She told Noelles brother and he felt like he had to protect her. Noelle lost her virginity to parker and one night when she went to parkers house because he invited her to his house party he broke up with her. Noelle went crazy she yelled at a teacher in her class about her having her sunglasses on so she tld da teacher off. The teacher called her twin brother and her brother got Kellie and went inti a private room in the principals office she tld her brother off and kellie becaus they were hiding their relationship from her. They were in shock Noelle ran out of school went to her house and attempted to kill her self but didnt sucide because her brother and kellie found her before it was to late and took her to the emergency. When she gopt out she got her self a job at a bakery which cooking by the way parker loved doing so anyways shes working their and one day parker shows up out of no were and she notices his new tattos but she tells him she has to go back to work and so yup that preety much was a good bye. Noelle got a tattoo she felt like she needed her own story branded on her to


  8. Ari Noth Ari Noth says:

    Oh god, this book was just devastating. Its like the book should have a big red sticker that says, DO NOT READ IF YOU ARE A. SUICIDAL B. DEPRESSED C. ETC. I mean really. I didnt cry granted but I was like, OMFG WHY! Yeah, so not for those who are any of the listed above. Its a beautiful story. The dialog became a bit confusing here and there do to its unusual set up but all in all the book was just amazing. Okay so I did want to punch a few characters (hmm that seems to be a trend...) but I couldnt help it. Some of them were just simply infuriating. Okay and Ill admit I did look up a cookbook mentioned because Noelle said she wanted to learn what it was. So what judge me. I thought it was a date rape cookbook. Okay so I did become a little imaginative here and there but oh well. That was the beauty of the book. It left you wondering what it was that happened/what something was until the last chunk of the book. Gotta love books like that. Read it, I swear you wont regret it :) (unless or an A. B. or C.)


  9. Sab H. (YA Bliss) Sab H. (YA Bliss) says:

    This book was really interesting. It really explores the confusion we feel in our teen years and the problem with the secrets we keep in moments of confusion. I really enjoyed reading from Nadio's point of view, he was private, mysterious and fascinating. The story got to me because they were all so confused and uncertain, that I could relate. And we all tend to keep things inside us, unsaid.

    The writing was different, that felt nice. She uses dialog in an interesting way, but it did feel confusing at times. The plot was easy, it's a really short read. The characters were good, just regular teenagers with crappy problems. I always like books that explore the sibling relationship; in this case, Noelle and Nadio not only are sibling but twins. Which fascinates me.

    For some reason I love the cover. It has a lot to do with the book. If you're a confused teenager you should read this or if you enjoy light reads and teen issues this may be a book for you.


  10. Terry Terry says:

    Reading this reminded me a bit of Francesca Lia Block's The Hanged Man, minus the magical elements. Stone explores how relationships change because of jealousy, secrets, and just plain growing up in easy-to-read prose. Something dark tints everything as the plot unfolds and the characters present their version of Junior Year. Decisions about sex are explicit in the book, but I liked the way Stone made these momentous choices more about the way physicality changes - or doesn't change - the underlying nature of affection and connection between teens. This was a good, moody read that wasn't melodramatically over the top.


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