Ten Things I Hate About the Duke

Ten Things I Hate About the Duke ePUB ↠ I Hate

Ten Things I Hate About the Duke ❮Read❯ ➸ Ten Things I Hate About the Duke ➻ Author Loretta Chase – Polishdarling.co.uk USA Today bestselling author Loretta Chase continues her Difficult Dukes series with this delightful spin on Shakespeare's classic, The Taming of the Shrew

This time, who’s taming whom…I Hate PDF/EPUB é Chase continues her Difficult Dukes series with this delightful spin on Shakespeare's classic, The Taming of the ShrewThis time, who’s taming whom…Cassandra Pomfret holds strong opinions she isn’t shy about voicing Ten Things PDF \ But her extremely plain speaking has caused an uproar, and her exasperated father, hoping a husband will rein her in, has ruled that her beloved sister can’t marry until Cassandra does Now, thanks to a certain wildliving Things I Hate PDF ☆ nobleman, the last shreds of Cassandra’s reputation are about to disintegrate, taking her sister’s future and her family’s good name along with them The Duke of Ashmont’s looks make women swoon His character flaws are beyond counting He’s lost a perfectly good bride through his own carelessness He nearly killed one of his two best friends Still, troublemaker that he is, he knows that damaging a lady’s good name isn’t sporting The only way to right the wrong is to marry her…and hope she doesn’t smother him in his sleep on their wedding night.


About the Author: Loretta Chase

Loretta Lynda Chekani was born I Hate PDF/EPUB é in , of Albanian ancestry For her, the trouble started when she learned to write in first grade Before then, she had been making up her own stories but now she Ten Things PDF \ knew how to write them down to share In her teenage years, she continue to write letters, keep a journal, write poetry and even attempt the Great American Novel still unfinished She attended New Engl.



10 thoughts on “Ten Things I Hate About the Duke

  1. Em Wittmann Em Wittmann says:

    4.5

    One of my favorite books this year.

    I'm taking away that half star only because I wish there was more romance (the kissy kissy cuddly kind) in this novel! I did enjoy it - but there's so much happening before the principal characters eventually confess their love for each other, we don't get enough of them as a romantic “stars in their eyes” couple. I know, I know, you're whispering falling in love IS romantic, Em - and you're right! I know it, too! I just want people (people = every couple in the romance novels I read) to acknowledge their love for each other and then to spend more than one chapter enjoying/showboating their Happily Ever After. And NOT just in swoony epilogues (which I love, by the way. Definitely keep those, too!)

    (Side note for the sexy times worriers out there: There are quite a few sexy shenanigan moments in this story because the Duke of Ashmont is NAUGHTY AND HOT AND TOTALLY IN LUST WITH CASSANDRA. And they can't resist each other. So no need to worry.)

    Anyway, moving on. EVERYONE ON EARTH (read: me) has been waiting for the second book in the Difficult Dukes series. A Duke in Shining Armor was fabulous (the audio was maybe even better), and I couldn't wait for Ms. Chase to spend more time with our jilted, naughty, wild and flawed Duke of Ashmont (one of Ripley's mischievous/scandalous besties). Friends, family, sort of aunts...well, they're exhausted by his antics and perfectly willing to tell him so. Fortunately, Ashton’s Come to Jesus moment happens hard on the heels/hours after a duel disaster with Ripley (who stole his fiance Lady Olympia Hightower).

    Ashmont, drunk and sad over nearly killing his best friend Ripley, is biding his time over cocktails with his second at one of his favorite pubs. The owners are used to his hijinks, fond of his coin, and tolerant of his behavior. But as usual, the day doesn't quite go to plan. When chaos erupts at the pub, Ashmont steps outside to shoot his pistol and put an end to the hijinks, and inadvertently sends a carriage and its riders careening through the street. Horrified, he runs to help and watches the carriage tip over. He’s relieved when the redhead who was holding the reins sits up, and then the woman next to her ( her maid) stirs and also appears unharmed. He’s considering what to do next when the vaguely familiar red headed woman stands up, begins insulting him and hits him with her hat, knocking him off his feet.

    Still drunk and now dazed and a little bit afraid, he gets up and follows her to a man lying motionless near a tree. Ashton immediately recognizes him. It's Tom Keeffe, a once successful jockey who survived a terrible accident that ended his career, and Ashton is a fan. They exchange greetings as Cassandra (the redhead who seems vaguely familiar to Ashmont) fumes, until she finally silences the pair. Ashton, confused about why the woman is with Keeffe and uncertain what to do next (he doesn't want to make her mad) staggers and then passes out. Oops.

    Friends, you read that right. It’s been a LONG and DRUNKEN day. He comes to after the redhead dumps a bucket of water on his face and tells him to get up and make himself and his money useful. #badass

    Cassandra Pomfret, sometimes referred to as Medusa or deGriffith’s Gorgon or Cassandra Prophet of Doom, is intelligent and opinionated. She's also, much to her father’s chagrin, unafraid to share her opinions, and when Ten Things I Hate About the Duke (WOW THAT IS A LONG TITLE!) begins, her plain speaking has gotten her into bigger trouble than usual. Trouble with The Family. Exasperated by her behavior and unwilling to tolerate it any longer, her father issues an ultimatum he hopes will force her to change: Hyacinth, her beautiful, beloved younger sister - the belle of the season - cannot marry until Cassandra does. She also can't attend any of the events of the season. The ultimatum saddens and infuriates Cassandra who decides to get away from London and reassess how to move forward - without hurting Hyacinth (who is remarkably kind about the whole thing. From start to finish she's lovely!).

    Cassandra is enroute to the home of her former governess, accompanied by her maid and companion and friend Tom Keeffe,

    He’d taught her to ride and drive. He’d been with her from the time she was a troublesome girl of fourteen and he a crippled ex-jockey of six and twenty. For nearly twelve years she’d relied on his wisdom, and not only about horses.
    when disaster strikes. A group of men pour out of the Green Man onto the street, and then a buffoon shoots his pistol into the air, sending her horses into a frenzy.

    Cassandra is cataloging her injuries and trying to sit up when she recognizes the man crouched next to her asking if she's okay. It's the beautiful, angel faced Duke of Ashmont, the man she loved as a young girl until he proved unworthy of her affections. The same idiot who just fought a duel with his best friend after his fiancee jilted him. Well. Shit.

    Oh friends! This whole scene is a hot mess of Ashmont trying and failing to fix the GIGANTIC mess he’s made, and Cassandra awesomely putting him in his place. I loved her, I loved him, I loved sweet Tom Keeffe - who quickly does some romantic mental matchmaking, and I loved how the carriage disaster sets these two on a path together. Ashmont is no dummy (he just acts like one in public All the Time). He’s a sexy badass who keeps making bad decisions, but has finally realized that drinking and shenanigans are ruining his life. He’s also just met the one woman who gives as good as she gets. Fortunately he has an uncle (and his only living relative) to help him out of his various messes, but this time - instead of fixing everything - he gives Ashmont advice...and Ashmont follows it.

    Unfortunately for Cassandra, a single woman involved in a carriage accident (while minimally chaperoned), plus an infamous drunken duke, plus an injured former jockey, plus a missing maid, plus an overnight visit in a small village at a local inn famed for the exploits of the three dukes who love to visit, equals a disaster in the making. Fortunately the drunken duke is super rich and keeps the rumors quiet, but then he just can’t stay away. And then the real nightmare begins.

    ASHMONT DECIDES HE WANTS HER. TO BE HIS WIFE. AND HE’S SEXY AND HOT AND NICE AND KIND AND TRYING TO BE BETTER. FOR HER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And lucky for readers, the only person who thinks Ashton’s interest in Cassandra is a disaster, is CASSANDRA! (well, her dad, too). Ashton is IN LOVE. And Cassandra used to love Ashton. AND it is a battle of wits, and sexy smirks, and good smelling cologne and smart, clever repartee, and chemistry and...friends, this novel is so much fun.

    Look, the majority of this novel is a game of Cassandra trying to pretend she doesn’t want Ashton to prove his love to her, and Ashton slowly but surely figuring out the best way to do it. He quickly realizes Cassandra is good to everyone but herself, and he makes it his job to understand his prickly, brainy lady love. He reads Wollstonecraft, learns about issues that are important to her, and protects her from anyone and anything that aims to do her harm. Oh yeah, there are a couple of villains in this story, too! Ashmont and Cassandra are lovely together in every iteration - enemies, co-conspirators, friends, and eventually lovers, and it is a JOY to read yet another terrific Chase romance.

    Readers expect the carriage disaster to prove the biggest impediment to love between Cassandra and Ashmont, but it's a nice misdirection from this brilliant author. It's the villains of this story that actually nudge the romance in the right (sexy times) direction and keep readers on their toes with their fingers crossed. Great chemistry, sparkling dialogue, well developed principal characters, and a lovely opposites attract pairing made my heart go BOOM. These two are meant for each other, and this book is a TREMENDOUS follow-up to the equally good A Duke in Shining Armor. Fans of the series will be very happy.

    Terrific. HIGHLY RECOMMEND. Can’t wait for the audio.

    P.S. You want to know about Ripley and Olympia, and the Duke of Blackmoor and Alice, don't you? I wish we spent more time with them, but their cameos are all-to brief. We still don't know what's up with Alice!


  2. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    ARC received for review

    I put this one down, and really thought it was going to end up in the DNF pile. I read another book, and then went back to this one. I really enjoyed it. I'm wondering if I would have like it more if I had read the first book.

    Cassandra and the Duke/Ashmont/Lucius had a past. Okay, not really. They knew each as children and she, of course, was in love with him. He and his friends were trouble makers, and she knew to she should stay away. It was a nice romance with a hint of intrigue/danger thrown in. I didn't even mind that (view spoiler)[ the first love scene was in the last chapter (hide spoiler)]


  3. Stephanie (Jump) Stephanie (Jump) says:

    I hope this will be as much fun as the first book in the series! 2019 though... That's one heck of a wait! And now pushed back to 2020. 😰


  4. Cassandra Cassandra says:

    Thank you to Avon and Edelweiss for an eARC of Chase's second book in the Difficult Dukes series. Ashmont's story was a long time coming (3 years?) and when you consider what a mess he was in the first book, where he is decidedly NOT heroic, you get a sense of just why it might have taken Chase some time to work out just what to do with him.

    The title gives a nod to Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew and there are lovely little Shakespearean touches throughout, but the problem in the story is not the heroine, Cassandra Pomfret, it is the Duke of Ashmont. He's a drunken, thoughtless, irresponsible mess who has blundered about hurting people and pulling pranks and generally behaving like he's 12. His interactions with Cassandra are a catalyst for him to realize it's time to get his act together and behave like a gentleman.

    Cassandra is the real star of this book and although she's a problem in the sense that she's outspoken, energetic, and interested in expanding the constrained nature of women's lives; she is an utter delight in this book. Her lack of interest in polite society does not make her a social hit and her father, Lord DeGriffith, attempts to get her married off by not allowing her more traditional (but still observant and intelligent) sister to have her Season until Cassandra is married. I appreciated that Cassandra's father is not a monster, but genuinely loves his daughters and his marriage is very much a partnership. In fact, Lady DeGriffith has a delightful scene where she pushes her husband aside to exercises female soft power VERY effectively. I was laughing out loud because you can definitely see where Cassandra gets it from. Cassandra's family loves her although they don't always understand her and she loves them and this was a highlight of the book.

    In fact, I loved Cassandra Pomfret too through this entire book. Her weapon of choice-the umbrella-, her creative use of pantaloons, her concern for her driver and partner in crime, her energy, and her wits all make her a remarkable person. And the exasperation with 19th century 'mansplaining' was a chef's kiss. She tried to remember the last time a man had sought her opinion about anything remotely important. She tried to remember the last time a man had hesitated to offer his, whether he was asked or not. Never. The answer was, never.

    Ashmont is utterly fascinated by her, values her opinion, and falls so fast that it's delightful to see. She shakes him up and while she doesn't reform him, he starts to realize he needs to do better with the gifts and privileges he has because so many are without them. Cassandra agrees to a fake engagement for her sister's sake and because despite his mess, he listens to her and she finds him beautiful. The expression of female desire is really flipped here which was fascinating to see. Usually, in a romance novel, it's the woman who is the object of desire. Chase gives you Ashmont as the object of desire for Cassandra and what fun that is to read about in a historical in 2020. She doesn't need him, but she surely wants him. So who exactly is the Shrew being tamed here? It's about time.

    There were so many little lines and scenes that I wanted to highlight, but couldn't since it's an eARC, but the whole book is just so skillfully crafted and beautifully written that I was just in awe. Take your time, Loretta Chase. Because I still want to know about Lady Charles (Aunt Julia) and Lord Frederick and what on earth is up with the Blackwoods?

    5 enthusiastic stars!


  5. ChasingLeslie ChasingLeslie says:

    Fresh from a jilting and a duel with one of his best friends, an inebriated Lucian, Duke of Ashmont, causes a carriage accident that injures Miss Cassandra Pomfret’s groom/friend. Being alone at an inn seeking medical attention could be interpreted as a compromising situation, so Ashmont asks Cassandra to be his replacement duchess. She is less than impressed, but he is unrelenting.

    This is the second book in the Difficult Dukes series. It can be read alone, but it takes place right after the events of the first book. I really tried, but I simply could not connect with this book. I didn’t particularly like any of the characters and, at the beginning, I felt like Ashmont was creating more of bond with Cassandra’s groom than with her! I didn’t find him engaging or humorous, and Cassandra felt equally flat and fickle. I didn’t see the love…the romance was lacking for me, both emotionally and physically.

    * I received an ARC and this is my honest review. #TenThingsIHateAboutTheDuke #NetGalley


  6. Heather Heather says:

    One of my favorite reads of 2020!

    This second volume of the Difficult Dukes series has been several years in the making. I noted in another review for a different author that I really think the pressure of publishing every single year is taking its toll on writing quality. This book is a perfect example of the magic that can happen when an author is given the time to tell the story they want to tell and how they want to tell it.

    Ten Things I Hate About the Duke is a delightfully funny romp. Ashmont is an absolute mess at the start, which is no surprise after his performance in the first book. Yet even when we meet him, there's something redeemable in his behavior from the start. It is a tricky business to make a character like Ashmont likable, but Chase did it effortlessly. I found myself laughing at him in a fond sort of way, much as Cassandra comes to. He's a mess, but he's HER mess.

    Cassandra herself is a powerfully feminist character. If I have a quibble with Chase, it's that I want the not like other girls line to be drop kicked straight into the sun and never be seen or heard from again. There ARE other girls like Cassandra within her own world, being that she belongs to a club full of women who are working toward their own worth and freedom. But aside from that, Cassandra is a character who knows her own mind and acts accordingly. She is straightforward and not shy about going for what she wants, even if society would have it otherwise.

    The side characters shine, from the much beloved jockey Keefe, to Cassandra's parents and family. I might have done without Owsley getting point of view scenes, but I did enjoy seeing Cassandra's mother take on Lady Bartham's nastiness in her own way. Sommers is delightful as a fussy valet, and I laughed aloud at Chase's line regarding valets being either high strung or silent, a seemingly tongue in cheek poke at the usual valets that show up in the genre.

    Ashmont's attempts to right his own proverbial ship are endearing and amusing, but underneath that show a man actually doing the work to improve. I appreciate that Chase doesn't rely entirely on Cassandra showing Ashmont how to better himself. He tries on his own, with mixed results, but it's the trying that endears him to Cassandra and readers alike. I think it very neatly captures what a lot of people dream of in partners: not that someone will be perfect, but that they will try to be better than they were the day before.

    I laughed a lot reading this book, which is a gift all in itself this year. It's sweet and funny and clever. I will happily wait another three years for the next volume if this is the end result.

    Thank you to the publisher via Edelweiss for providing an e-arc in exchange for a fair review.


  7. Molly Molly says:

    This is a beautify written story, classic in prose, with Loretta Chase's unique style, that's enchanting and heartwarming. I loved it all - the vibrant characters, the lovely prose, the heartwarming plot. It's nice to come to this world and escape the dreadful reality - there's conflict and adversity, but also humor and wit and passion. I can't wait for the next one. Recommend!


  8. Lady Wesley Lady Wesley says:

    22 Sept 2020

    So excited to receive an ARC of this new Loretta Chase book. I may be up late tonight reading!


  9. Lena Lena says:

    *I was given an ARC in Edelweiss under no obligation*
    I can't even. I loved the first book in this series so much and I was waiting for the second one... and it was SO MUCH BETTER than I hoped.
    It was hard to picture how Ashmont, that good for nothing jilted groom from the first book , was going to be redeemed. But in his favor, we knew he had a heart of gold from the final interactions between him, Ripley and Olympia on the first book. He wasn't pleased with the situation but he did what he could to actually save her honor and give her and Ripley a clean slate.
    And seeing him at his worst, meeting Cassandra and trying (and failing) to do the right thing is heartwarming.
    Cassandra is outspoken, valiant and very much an unconditional lady that refuses to let him get away with anything, no matter how much she used to adore him when they were kids. I was really drawn at how much she mourns the person she thought he could be and calls him on it.
    Seeing Ashmont's transformation is a thing of beauty. Not because is a 180 change because of a woman but it's because he really takes a pause to start *thinking* and realizing things. He starts to listen and while he still makes mistakes, you can see how he tries to be better and get better, even to the point of letting her go if needed.
    This is a lovely retelling of The Taming of The Shrew and the secondary characters are a delight!
    I honestly can't wait for Alive and Blackwood. I can only imagine the angst on that one.


  10. Dabney Dabney says:

    This is how it's done.

    I loved every single thing about this book.


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10 thoughts on “Ten Things I Hate About the Duke

  1. Em Wittmann Em Wittmann says:

    4.5

    One of my favorite books this year.

    I'm taking away that half star only because I wish there was more romance (the kissy kissy cuddly kind) in this novel! I did enjoy it - but there's so much happening before the principal characters eventually confess their love for each other, we don't get enough of them as a romantic “stars in their eyes” couple. I know, I know, you're whispering falling in love IS romantic, Em - and you're right! I know it, too! I just want people (people = every couple in the romance novels I read) to acknowledge their love for each other and then to spend more than one chapter enjoying/showboating their Happily Ever After. And NOT just in swoony epilogues (which I love, by the way. Definitely keep those, too!)

    (Side note for the sexy times worriers out there: There are quite a few sexy shenanigan moments in this story because the Duke of Ashmont is NAUGHTY AND HOT AND TOTALLY IN LUST WITH CASSANDRA. And they can't resist each other. So no need to worry.)

    Anyway, moving on. EVERYONE ON EARTH (read: me) has been waiting for the second book in the Difficult Dukes series. A Duke in Shining Armor was fabulous (the audio was maybe even better), and I couldn't wait for Ms. Chase to spend more time with our jilted, naughty, wild and flawed Duke of Ashmont (one of Ripley's mischievous/scandalous besties). Friends, family, sort of aunts...well, they're exhausted by his antics and perfectly willing to tell him so. Fortunately, Ashton’s Come to Jesus moment happens hard on the heels/hours after a duel disaster with Ripley (who stole his fiance Lady Olympia Hightower).

    Ashmont, drunk and sad over nearly killing his best friend Ripley, is biding his time over cocktails with his second at one of his favorite pubs. The owners are used to his hijinks, fond of his coin, and tolerant of his behavior. But as usual, the day doesn't quite go to plan. When chaos erupts at the pub, Ashmont steps outside to shoot his pistol and put an end to the hijinks, and inadvertently sends a carriage and its riders careening through the street. Horrified, he runs to help and watches the carriage tip over. He’s relieved when the redhead who was holding the reins sits up, and then the woman next to her ( her maid) stirs and also appears unharmed. He’s considering what to do next when the vaguely familiar red headed woman stands up, begins insulting him and hits him with her hat, knocking him off his feet.

    Still drunk and now dazed and a little bit afraid, he gets up and follows her to a man lying motionless near a tree. Ashton immediately recognizes him. It's Tom Keeffe, a once successful jockey who survived a terrible accident that ended his career, and Ashton is a fan. They exchange greetings as Cassandra (the redhead who seems vaguely familiar to Ashmont) fumes, until she finally silences the pair. Ashton, confused about why the woman is with Keeffe and uncertain what to do next (he doesn't want to make her mad) staggers and then passes out. Oops.

    Friends, you read that right. It’s been a LONG and DRUNKEN day. He comes to after the redhead dumps a bucket of water on his face and tells him to get up and make himself and his money useful. #badass

    Cassandra Pomfret, sometimes referred to as Medusa or deGriffith’s Gorgon or Cassandra Prophet of Doom, is intelligent and opinionated. She's also, much to her father’s chagrin, unafraid to share her opinions, and when Ten Things I Hate About the Duke (WOW THAT IS A LONG TITLE!) begins, her plain speaking has gotten her into bigger trouble than usual. Trouble with The Family. Exasperated by her behavior and unwilling to tolerate it any longer, her father issues an ultimatum he hopes will force her to change: Hyacinth, her beautiful, beloved younger sister - the belle of the season - cannot marry until Cassandra does. She also can't attend any of the events of the season. The ultimatum saddens and infuriates Cassandra who decides to get away from London and reassess how to move forward - without hurting Hyacinth (who is remarkably kind about the whole thing. From start to finish she's lovely!).

    Cassandra is enroute to the home of her former governess, accompanied by her maid and companion and friend Tom Keeffe,

    He’d taught her to ride and drive. He’d been with her from the time she was a troublesome girl of fourteen and he a crippled ex-jockey of six and twenty. For nearly twelve years she’d relied on his wisdom, and not only about horses.
    when disaster strikes. A group of men pour out of the Green Man onto the street, and then a buffoon shoots his pistol into the air, sending her horses into a frenzy.

    Cassandra is cataloging her injuries and trying to sit up when she recognizes the man crouched next to her asking if she's okay. It's the beautiful, angel faced Duke of Ashmont, the man she loved as a young girl until he proved unworthy of her affections. The same idiot who just fought a duel with his best friend after his fiancee jilted him. Well. Shit.

    Oh friends! This whole scene is a hot mess of Ashmont trying and failing to fix the GIGANTIC mess he’s made, and Cassandra awesomely putting him in his place. I loved her, I loved him, I loved sweet Tom Keeffe - who quickly does some romantic mental matchmaking, and I loved how the carriage disaster sets these two on a path together. Ashmont is no dummy (he just acts like one in public All the Time). He’s a sexy badass who keeps making bad decisions, but has finally realized that drinking and shenanigans are ruining his life. He’s also just met the one woman who gives as good as she gets. Fortunately he has an uncle (and his only living relative) to help him out of his various messes, but this time - instead of fixing everything - he gives Ashmont advice...and Ashmont follows it.

    Unfortunately for Cassandra, a single woman involved in a carriage accident (while minimally chaperoned), plus an infamous drunken duke, plus an injured former jockey, plus a missing maid, plus an overnight visit in a small village at a local inn famed for the exploits of the three dukes who love to visit, equals a disaster in the making. Fortunately the drunken duke is super rich and keeps the rumors quiet, but then he just can’t stay away. And then the real nightmare begins.

    ASHMONT DECIDES HE WANTS HER. TO BE HIS WIFE. AND HE’S SEXY AND HOT AND NICE AND KIND AND TRYING TO BE BETTER. FOR HER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And lucky for readers, the only person who thinks Ashton’s interest in Cassandra is a disaster, is CASSANDRA! (well, her dad, too). Ashton is IN LOVE. And Cassandra used to love Ashton. AND it is a battle of wits, and sexy smirks, and good smelling cologne and smart, clever repartee, and chemistry and...friends, this novel is so much fun.

    Look, the majority of this novel is a game of Cassandra trying to pretend she doesn’t want Ashton to prove his love to her, and Ashton slowly but surely figuring out the best way to do it. He quickly realizes Cassandra is good to everyone but herself, and he makes it his job to understand his prickly, brainy lady love. He reads Wollstonecraft, learns about issues that are important to her, and protects her from anyone and anything that aims to do her harm. Oh yeah, there are a couple of villains in this story, too! Ashmont and Cassandra are lovely together in every iteration - enemies, co-conspirators, friends, and eventually lovers, and it is a JOY to read yet another terrific Chase romance.

    Readers expect the carriage disaster to prove the biggest impediment to love between Cassandra and Ashmont, but it's a nice misdirection from this brilliant author. It's the villains of this story that actually nudge the romance in the right (sexy times) direction and keep readers on their toes with their fingers crossed. Great chemistry, sparkling dialogue, well developed principal characters, and a lovely opposites attract pairing made my heart go BOOM. These two are meant for each other, and this book is a TREMENDOUS follow-up to the equally good A Duke in Shining Armor. Fans of the series will be very happy.

    Terrific. HIGHLY RECOMMEND. Can’t wait for the audio.

    P.S. You want to know about Ripley and Olympia, and the Duke of Blackmoor and Alice, don't you? I wish we spent more time with them, but their cameos are all-to brief. We still don't know what's up with Alice!


  2. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    ARC received for review

    I put this one down, and really thought it was going to end up in the DNF pile. I read another book, and then went back to this one. I really enjoyed it. I'm wondering if I would have like it more if I had read the first book.

    Cassandra and the Duke/Ashmont/Lucius had a past. Okay, not really. They knew each as children and she, of course, was in love with him. He and his friends were trouble makers, and she knew to she should stay away. It was a nice romance with a hint of intrigue/danger thrown in. I didn't even mind that (view spoiler)[ the first love scene was in the last chapter (hide spoiler)]


  3. Stephanie (Jump) Stephanie (Jump) says:

    I hope this will be as much fun as the first book in the series! 2019 though... That's one heck of a wait! And now pushed back to 2020. 😰


  4. Cassandra Cassandra says:

    Thank you to Avon and Edelweiss for an eARC of Chase's second book in the Difficult Dukes series. Ashmont's story was a long time coming (3 years?) and when you consider what a mess he was in the first book, where he is decidedly NOT heroic, you get a sense of just why it might have taken Chase some time to work out just what to do with him.

    The title gives a nod to Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew and there are lovely little Shakespearean touches throughout, but the problem in the story is not the heroine, Cassandra Pomfret, it is the Duke of Ashmont. He's a drunken, thoughtless, irresponsible mess who has blundered about hurting people and pulling pranks and generally behaving like he's 12. His interactions with Cassandra are a catalyst for him to realize it's time to get his act together and behave like a gentleman.

    Cassandra is the real star of this book and although she's a problem in the sense that she's outspoken, energetic, and interested in expanding the constrained nature of women's lives; she is an utter delight in this book. Her lack of interest in polite society does not make her a social hit and her father, Lord DeGriffith, attempts to get her married off by not allowing her more traditional (but still observant and intelligent) sister to have her Season until Cassandra is married. I appreciated that Cassandra's father is not a monster, but genuinely loves his daughters and his marriage is very much a partnership. In fact, Lady DeGriffith has a delightful scene where she pushes her husband aside to exercises female soft power VERY effectively. I was laughing out loud because you can definitely see where Cassandra gets it from. Cassandra's family loves her although they don't always understand her and she loves them and this was a highlight of the book.

    In fact, I loved Cassandra Pomfret too through this entire book. Her weapon of choice-the umbrella-, her creative use of pantaloons, her concern for her driver and partner in crime, her energy, and her wits all make her a remarkable person. And the exasperation with 19th century 'mansplaining' was a chef's kiss. She tried to remember the last time a man had sought her opinion about anything remotely important. She tried to remember the last time a man had hesitated to offer his, whether he was asked or not. Never. The answer was, never.

    Ashmont is utterly fascinated by her, values her opinion, and falls so fast that it's delightful to see. She shakes him up and while she doesn't reform him, he starts to realize he needs to do better with the gifts and privileges he has because so many are without them. Cassandra agrees to a fake engagement for her sister's sake and because despite his mess, he listens to her and she finds him beautiful. The expression of female desire is really flipped here which was fascinating to see. Usually, in a romance novel, it's the woman who is the object of desire. Chase gives you Ashmont as the object of desire for Cassandra and what fun that is to read about in a historical in 2020. She doesn't need him, but she surely wants him. So who exactly is the Shrew being tamed here? It's about time.

    There were so many little lines and scenes that I wanted to highlight, but couldn't since it's an eARC, but the whole book is just so skillfully crafted and beautifully written that I was just in awe. Take your time, Loretta Chase. Because I still want to know about Lady Charles (Aunt Julia) and Lord Frederick and what on earth is up with the Blackwoods?

    5 enthusiastic stars!


  5. ChasingLeslie ChasingLeslie says:

    Fresh from a jilting and a duel with one of his best friends, an inebriated Lucian, Duke of Ashmont, causes a carriage accident that injures Miss Cassandra Pomfret’s groom/friend. Being alone at an inn seeking medical attention could be interpreted as a compromising situation, so Ashmont asks Cassandra to be his replacement duchess. She is less than impressed, but he is unrelenting.

    This is the second book in the Difficult Dukes series. It can be read alone, but it takes place right after the events of the first book. I really tried, but I simply could not connect with this book. I didn’t particularly like any of the characters and, at the beginning, I felt like Ashmont was creating more of bond with Cassandra’s groom than with her! I didn’t find him engaging or humorous, and Cassandra felt equally flat and fickle. I didn’t see the love…the romance was lacking for me, both emotionally and physically.

    * I received an ARC and this is my honest review. #TenThingsIHateAboutTheDuke #NetGalley


  6. Heather Heather says:

    One of my favorite reads of 2020!

    This second volume of the Difficult Dukes series has been several years in the making. I noted in another review for a different author that I really think the pressure of publishing every single year is taking its toll on writing quality. This book is a perfect example of the magic that can happen when an author is given the time to tell the story they want to tell and how they want to tell it.

    Ten Things I Hate About the Duke is a delightfully funny romp. Ashmont is an absolute mess at the start, which is no surprise after his performance in the first book. Yet even when we meet him, there's something redeemable in his behavior from the start. It is a tricky business to make a character like Ashmont likable, but Chase did it effortlessly. I found myself laughing at him in a fond sort of way, much as Cassandra comes to. He's a mess, but he's HER mess.

    Cassandra herself is a powerfully feminist character. If I have a quibble with Chase, it's that I want the not like other girls line to be drop kicked straight into the sun and never be seen or heard from again. There ARE other girls like Cassandra within her own world, being that she belongs to a club full of women who are working toward their own worth and freedom. But aside from that, Cassandra is a character who knows her own mind and acts accordingly. She is straightforward and not shy about going for what she wants, even if society would have it otherwise.

    The side characters shine, from the much beloved jockey Keefe, to Cassandra's parents and family. I might have done without Owsley getting point of view scenes, but I did enjoy seeing Cassandra's mother take on Lady Bartham's nastiness in her own way. Sommers is delightful as a fussy valet, and I laughed aloud at Chase's line regarding valets being either high strung or silent, a seemingly tongue in cheek poke at the usual valets that show up in the genre.

    Ashmont's attempts to right his own proverbial ship are endearing and amusing, but underneath that show a man actually doing the work to improve. I appreciate that Chase doesn't rely entirely on Cassandra showing Ashmont how to better himself. He tries on his own, with mixed results, but it's the trying that endears him to Cassandra and readers alike. I think it very neatly captures what a lot of people dream of in partners: not that someone will be perfect, but that they will try to be better than they were the day before.

    I laughed a lot reading this book, which is a gift all in itself this year. It's sweet and funny and clever. I will happily wait another three years for the next volume if this is the end result.

    Thank you to the publisher via Edelweiss for providing an e-arc in exchange for a fair review.


  7. Molly Molly says:

    This is a beautify written story, classic in prose, with Loretta Chase's unique style, that's enchanting and heartwarming. I loved it all - the vibrant characters, the lovely prose, the heartwarming plot. It's nice to come to this world and escape the dreadful reality - there's conflict and adversity, but also humor and wit and passion. I can't wait for the next one. Recommend!


  8. Lady Wesley Lady Wesley says:

    22 Sept 2020

    So excited to receive an ARC of this new Loretta Chase book. I may be up late tonight reading!


  9. Lena Lena says:

    *I was given an ARC in Edelweiss under no obligation*
    I can't even. I loved the first book in this series so much and I was waiting for the second one... and it was SO MUCH BETTER than I hoped.
    It was hard to picture how Ashmont, that good for nothing jilted groom from the first book , was going to be redeemed. But in his favor, we knew he had a heart of gold from the final interactions between him, Ripley and Olympia on the first book. He wasn't pleased with the situation but he did what he could to actually save her honor and give her and Ripley a clean slate.
    And seeing him at his worst, meeting Cassandra and trying (and failing) to do the right thing is heartwarming.
    Cassandra is outspoken, valiant and very much an unconditional lady that refuses to let him get away with anything, no matter how much she used to adore him when they were kids. I was really drawn at how much she mourns the person she thought he could be and calls him on it.
    Seeing Ashmont's transformation is a thing of beauty. Not because is a 180 change because of a woman but it's because he really takes a pause to start *thinking* and realizing things. He starts to listen and while he still makes mistakes, you can see how he tries to be better and get better, even to the point of letting her go if needed.
    This is a lovely retelling of The Taming of The Shrew and the secondary characters are a delight!
    I honestly can't wait for Alive and Blackwood. I can only imagine the angst on that one.


  10. Dabney Dabney says:

    This is how it's done.

    I loved every single thing about this book.


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