Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir

Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir PDF · Mamalita: An MOBI


Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir [Reading] ➸ Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir By Jessica O'Dwyer – Polishdarling.co.uk This gripping memoir details an ordinary American woman s quest to adopt a baby girl from Guatemala in the face of overwhelming adversity At only years old, Jessica O Dwyer experiences early menopaus This gripping memoir details an ordinary American woman s quest to adopt a baby girl from Guatemala in the face of overwhelming adversity At onlyyears old, Jessica O Dwyer experiences early menopause, seemingly ending her chances of becoming a mother Years later, married but childless, she comes across a photo of a two month old girl on a Guatemalan adoption website Mamalita: An MOBI :ï and feels an instant connection From the get go, Jessica and her husband face numerous and maddening obstacles After a year of tireless efforts, Jessica finds herself abandoned by her adoption agency undaunted, she quits her job and moves to Antigua so she can bring her little girl to live with her and wrap up the adoption, no matter what the cost Eventually, after months of disappointments, she finesses her way through the thorny adoption process and is finally able to bring her new daughter home Mamalita is as much a story about the bond between a mother and child as it is about the lengths adoptive parents go to in their quest to bring their children home At turns harrowing, heartbreaking, and inspiring, this is a classic story of the triumph of a mother s love over almost insurmountable odds.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format the adoption, no matter what the cost Eventually, after months of disappointments, she finesses her way through the thorny adoption process and is finally able to bring her new daughter home Mamalita is as much a story about the bond between a mother and child as it is about the lengths adoptive parents go to in their quest to bring their children home At turns harrowing, heartbreaking, and inspiring, this is a classic story of the triumph of a mother s love over almost insurmountable odds."/>
  • Paperback
  • 312 pages
  • Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir
  • Jessica O'Dwyer
  • English
  • 06 September 2019
  • 1580053343

About the Author: Jessica O'Dwyer

Jessica O Dwyer is the adoptive mother to two children born in Guatemala Her essays have been published in the San Francisco Chronicle Magazine, Adoptive Families, and the West Marin Review She lives in Northern California.



10 thoughts on “Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir

  1. Thorn MotherIssues Thorn MotherIssues says:

    Interesting that she was honest about the ways she and others paticipated in corruption when they were desperate, which is probably something unusual to read in an adoption memoir I found the last chapter about connections with birth family absolutely moving, but was also kind of frustrated throughout that someone who didn t do her due diligence and knew very little about adoption going in was able to get a book deal out of it Is that unfair I don t know.

  2. Judy Judy says:

    Bring tissues for the end I was sobbing I thought this book wouldn t engross me but it did actually a fast read which was a surprise It didn t matter whether I would or wouldn t do what the author did she does a great job of bringing you emotionally into her world She lives in Marin so we had the local angle as well.

  3. Karen Sukenic Karen Sukenic says:

    I felt like I was in Guatemala, going through every twist and turn of the author s story The descriptive details of their family s adoption story, the process, as well as the colorful descriptions of Guatemala as a beautiful and complicated country, heightened my connection to their adoption journey Definitely worth reading to learn about the journey to parenthood through adoption, and to learn about the complex and rich history of the Guatemalan people in this insightful, wise, reflective tal I felt like I was in Guatemala, going through every twist and turn of the author s story The descriptive details of their family s adoption story, the process, as well as the colorful descriptions of Guatemala as a beautiful and complicated country, heightened my connection to their adoption journey Definitely worth reading to learn about the journey to parenthood through adoption, and to learn about the complex and rich history of the Guatemalan people in this insightful, wise, reflective tale

  4. Audrey Walden Audrey Walden says:

    Was disappointed A friend gave it to me and enjoyed it I thought it read like a short story that had gone too long.

  5. Louise Louise says:

    This was a wonderfully written adoption memoir What Jessica and her husband Tim went through to adopt their daughter from Guatemala was an utter nightmare The obstacles, red tape, lies, excuses, the denigration, and misrepresentations were unbelievable.This memoir was part adventure story, travel story, love story and the unconditional fierce love that a mother feels for her child Jessica was a much stronger, courageous and braver woman than she ever thought she was To endure the heartbreaki This was a wonderfully written adoption memoir What Jessica and her husband Tim went through to adopt their daughter from Guatemala was an utter nightmare The obstacles, red tape, lies, excuses, the denigration, and misrepresentations were unbelievable.This memoir was part adventure story, travel story, love story and the unconditional fierce love that a mother feels for her child Jessica was a much stronger, courageous and braver woman than she ever thought she was To endure the heartbreaking and harrowing moments that she did, is a direct testament to her deep love for her child, Olivia.Jessica and her husband Tim, a dermatologist, did everything their adoption broker asked them to do including submitting birth certificates, filing forms, letters all on time however, the broker Yolanda they had gotten themselves involved with was less than honest with them and wasn t doing her job I hope someone shuts people like her down Honest, caring, loving people are going to these countries to adopt babies that no one wants, or ones that the Mom s just can t afford and want to see their child have a better life in America but when you end up dealing with someone like Yolanda and her contacts, it makes an already stressful task all thattaxing and traumatic.The bond between Olivia and Jessica is unbreakable, thanks to Jessica who finally went to Guatemala in the end and stayed for an entire month I don t want to ruin the story and tell you where she and Tim had gone, what they did and why Jessica ultimately decided to rent an apartment there for a month.This book was mesmerizing and I read it in one sitting, I just couldn t put it down Thank you Jessica for reminding us all of the children waiting for parents like you and Tim, and for reminding us that in order for some of us to receive children, someone else has to lose theirs I applaud both you and Tim for what you have done and for what you have given your children A new life packed full of love and the feelings of being wanted and needed

  6. Kristen Kristen says:

    Mamalita, by Jessica O Dwyer, was a very compelling story about the struggles of adoption In this memoir, Jessica and her husband agree on adopting a little girl Jessica feels drawn to adopt from the country of Guatemala because the babies adopted from that country usually get to their adopted families sooner than most countries However, Guatemala turns out to be a bad decision as the couple learn about its system and its unreliable adoptions My eyes were really opened to the struggles and l Mamalita, by Jessica O Dwyer, was a very compelling story about the struggles of adoption In this memoir, Jessica and her husband agree on adopting a little girl Jessica feels drawn to adopt from the country of Guatemala because the babies adopted from that country usually get to their adopted families sooner than most countries However, Guatemala turns out to be a bad decision as the couple learn about its system and its unreliable adoptions My eyes were really opened to the struggles and loops involved with adoptions, especially international The fact that the adoption culture seemedlike a business really stuck out to me The people that Jessica and Tim were working with didn t seem to care that they were trying to start a family, they just wanted the money I was startled by how much money they had to pay for the adoption, which gave me a couple ideas on how I could focus on lowering the cost of adoption for my capstone project I was also uplifted by the stories of families fighting so hard to bring their babies home, but it left me wondering if this back and forth between and adoptive family and foster family was healthy for the baby s development, another topic I could use I was overall impressed by Jessica s story and her courageousness I now have better insight in my capstone topic about adoptions because I have heard the details about a family s entire experience and their own emotions surrounding it I learnedabout the challenges with international adoption because of the countries different legal systems I have also gainedknowledge about the cost of adoption, both monetarily and emotionally Being able to get an inside look on the process will help me while researching about the steps of adoption because I will know what families have to go through emotionally at each step

  7. Michelle Michelle says:

    I appreciated the raw, authentic, honesty of the author however I did not find that I enjoyed the book as much as I hoped to Obviously, as a memoir Jessica O Dwyer is sharing her experience and portraying that experience of a Guatemalan US adoption as she lived it I, therefore do not find fault in the actual story.Perhaps, it was because I read this book as a woman who has considered adoption and wanted to knowabout it I knew there was corruption, and obviously we cannot expect to find I appreciated the raw, authentic, honesty of the author however I did not find that I enjoyed the book as much as I hoped to Obviously, as a memoir Jessica O Dwyer is sharing her experience and portraying that experience of a Guatemalan US adoption as she lived it I, therefore do not find fault in the actual story.Perhaps, it was because I read this book as a woman who has considered adoption and wanted to knowabout it I knew there was corruption, and obviously we cannot expect to find the same level of ethics and integrity when confronted with cultural, political landscapes and economic realities that are different from the N American experience however this book and the authors experience really made it glaringly obvious as to how much of a business international adoption has become And THAT is was turned me off I found it utterly heartbreaking to really try and relate to the emotional turmoil that the adoptive families go through, and how the birth mothers and those responsible for carrying for the children prior to adoption must feel during the adoption process And then I considered how all of these decisions drastically impact the life of a baby who is utterly oblivious to the decisions that are taking place around him and her and how those decisions will literally change every detail about the type of life they will live.and it s completely overwhelming My respect for all those parents, birth and adoptive has grown exponentially Adoption is absolutely not for everyone and those that are considering adoption really need to read as many memoirs as possible in order to immerse themselves in the subject in order to make the most informed choice possible

  8. Rosa Folgar Rosa Folgar says:

    I m still not sure how I feel about this book It is the first book I ve ever read about my country and its heartbreaking depiction of the maya indigenous and the poor remind me why I think it is a good story and I admire the author for tenacity and her honesty, but at the same time, I found it judge mental and I resent her.As I read the last pages and get to the end, I see the picture of Olivia and she looks just like my sister Our parents were there for the civil war and we were some of thos I m still not sure how I feel about this book It is the first book I ve ever read about my country and its heartbreaking depiction of the maya indigenous and the poor remind me why I think it is a good story and I admire the author for tenacity and her honesty, but at the same time, I found it judge mental and I resent her.As I read the last pages and get to the end, I see the picture of Olivia and she looks just like my sister Our parents were there for the civil war and we were some of those who sought refuge in the US in the 80 s my relatives still live there in those mountains and walk those dirt roads and I guess it hit a little too close for comfort.I do recommend the book if you are looking for information and experience with adoption I am glad Jessica never gave up on Olivia and I think it s wonderful she works so hard to make sure Olivia knows she is adopted but also loved and that she even found the birth mother and grandmother.In our culture, the older women who take care of us get the total of mama name My own grandmothers are mama Gina and mama Angelita That Ana was the one to give her the mamalita name was beautiful

  9. Louise Louise says:

    MY REVIEW Seal Press October 19, 2010 Trade Paperback ISBN 978 1 58005 334 1Jessica O Dwyer is the adoptive mother of two children born in Guatemala, Olivia and, Mateo.Jessica and her doctor husband went to hell and back trying to get their daughter out of Guatemala It wasn t the most pleasant experience of their lives Dealing with corrupt people, knowing who to trust and who not to trust was one of their biggest hurdles From lost documentation to cover ups it didn t seem as though this coup MY REVIEW Seal Press October 19, 2010 Trade Paperback ISBN 978 1 58005 334 1Jessica O Dwyer is the adoptive mother of two children born in Guatemala, Olivia and, Mateo.Jessica and her doctor husband went to hell and back trying to get their daughter out of Guatemala It wasn t the most pleasant experience of their lives Dealing with corrupt people, knowing who to trust and who not to trust was one of their biggest hurdles From lost documentation to cover ups it didn t seem as though this couple was ever going to get Olivia home to America The strength and courage they showed in the face of adversity and threats was humbling Jessica eventually moved to Guatemala to live there with Olivia in the hope of expediting the process but it still took over a year to get her out of the country The reading was riveting and I read this book in one sitting, it was an amazing story to say the least I commend them both on their dedication, motivation, and stamina to stay with the program against all odds No matter what was thrown up in their faces, they trudged on and found a way through the muck and mire Exceptional memoir

  10. Jamie Jamie says:

    This is a seriously great and unique book If you are interested in adoption, international travel, or Latin American culture, this will be a book to enjoy Mamalita offered unique insight into the increasingly controversial practice of international adoption The author is exceedingly brave in being extremely open about her adoption experience She wasn t afraid to air some unflattering information about herself If you love the complicated and fascinating country of Guatemala, you will also lo This is a seriously great and unique book If you are interested in adoption, international travel, or Latin American culture, this will be a book to enjoy Mamalita offered unique insight into the increasingly controversial practice of international adoption The author is exceedingly brave in being extremely open about her adoption experience She wasn t afraid to air some unflattering information about herself If you love the complicated and fascinating country of Guatemala, you will also love this book You ll love traveling around with the author to Tikal, Atitlan, and Antigua Her insight into political and racial relations in Guatamala is interesting and accurate In the end it s a touching story about a woman willing to do anything for her daughter The final pages left me in tears

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10 thoughts on “Mamalita: An Adoption Memoir

  1. Thorn MotherIssues Thorn MotherIssues says:

    Interesting that she was honest about the ways she and others paticipated in corruption when they were desperate, which is probably something unusual to read in an adoption memoir I found the last chapter about connections with birth family absolutely moving, but was also kind of frustrated throughout that someone who didn t do her due diligence and knew very little about adoption going in was able to get a book deal out of it Is that unfair I don t know.


  2. Judy Judy says:

    Bring tissues for the end I was sobbing I thought this book wouldn t engross me but it did actually a fast read which was a surprise It didn t matter whether I would or wouldn t do what the author did she does a great job of bringing you emotionally into her world She lives in Marin so we had the local angle as well.


  3. Karen Sukenic Karen Sukenic says:

    I felt like I was in Guatemala, going through every twist and turn of the author s story The descriptive details of their family s adoption story, the process, as well as the colorful descriptions of Guatemala as a beautiful and complicated country, heightened my connection to their adoption journey Definitely worth reading to learn about the journey to parenthood through adoption, and to learn about the complex and rich history of the Guatemalan people in this insightful, wise, reflective tal I felt like I was in Guatemala, going through every twist and turn of the author s story The descriptive details of their family s adoption story, the process, as well as the colorful descriptions of Guatemala as a beautiful and complicated country, heightened my connection to their adoption journey Definitely worth reading to learn about the journey to parenthood through adoption, and to learn about the complex and rich history of the Guatemalan people in this insightful, wise, reflective tale


  4. Audrey Walden Audrey Walden says:

    Was disappointed A friend gave it to me and enjoyed it I thought it read like a short story that had gone too long.


  5. Louise Louise says:

    This was a wonderfully written adoption memoir What Jessica and her husband Tim went through to adopt their daughter from Guatemala was an utter nightmare The obstacles, red tape, lies, excuses, the denigration, and misrepresentations were unbelievable.This memoir was part adventure story, travel story, love story and the unconditional fierce love that a mother feels for her child Jessica was a much stronger, courageous and braver woman than she ever thought she was To endure the heartbreaki This was a wonderfully written adoption memoir What Jessica and her husband Tim went through to adopt their daughter from Guatemala was an utter nightmare The obstacles, red tape, lies, excuses, the denigration, and misrepresentations were unbelievable.This memoir was part adventure story, travel story, love story and the unconditional fierce love that a mother feels for her child Jessica was a much stronger, courageous and braver woman than she ever thought she was To endure the heartbreaking and harrowing moments that she did, is a direct testament to her deep love for her child, Olivia.Jessica and her husband Tim, a dermatologist, did everything their adoption broker asked them to do including submitting birth certificates, filing forms, letters all on time however, the broker Yolanda they had gotten themselves involved with was less than honest with them and wasn t doing her job I hope someone shuts people like her down Honest, caring, loving people are going to these countries to adopt babies that no one wants, or ones that the Mom s just can t afford and want to see their child have a better life in America but when you end up dealing with someone like Yolanda and her contacts, it makes an already stressful task all thattaxing and traumatic.The bond between Olivia and Jessica is unbreakable, thanks to Jessica who finally went to Guatemala in the end and stayed for an entire month I don t want to ruin the story and tell you where she and Tim had gone, what they did and why Jessica ultimately decided to rent an apartment there for a month.This book was mesmerizing and I read it in one sitting, I just couldn t put it down Thank you Jessica for reminding us all of the children waiting for parents like you and Tim, and for reminding us that in order for some of us to receive children, someone else has to lose theirs I applaud both you and Tim for what you have done and for what you have given your children A new life packed full of love and the feelings of being wanted and needed


  6. Kristen Kristen says:

    Mamalita, by Jessica O Dwyer, was a very compelling story about the struggles of adoption In this memoir, Jessica and her husband agree on adopting a little girl Jessica feels drawn to adopt from the country of Guatemala because the babies adopted from that country usually get to their adopted families sooner than most countries However, Guatemala turns out to be a bad decision as the couple learn about its system and its unreliable adoptions My eyes were really opened to the struggles and l Mamalita, by Jessica O Dwyer, was a very compelling story about the struggles of adoption In this memoir, Jessica and her husband agree on adopting a little girl Jessica feels drawn to adopt from the country of Guatemala because the babies adopted from that country usually get to their adopted families sooner than most countries However, Guatemala turns out to be a bad decision as the couple learn about its system and its unreliable adoptions My eyes were really opened to the struggles and loops involved with adoptions, especially international The fact that the adoption culture seemedlike a business really stuck out to me The people that Jessica and Tim were working with didn t seem to care that they were trying to start a family, they just wanted the money I was startled by how much money they had to pay for the adoption, which gave me a couple ideas on how I could focus on lowering the cost of adoption for my capstone project I was also uplifted by the stories of families fighting so hard to bring their babies home, but it left me wondering if this back and forth between and adoptive family and foster family was healthy for the baby s development, another topic I could use I was overall impressed by Jessica s story and her courageousness I now have better insight in my capstone topic about adoptions because I have heard the details about a family s entire experience and their own emotions surrounding it I learnedabout the challenges with international adoption because of the countries different legal systems I have also gainedknowledge about the cost of adoption, both monetarily and emotionally Being able to get an inside look on the process will help me while researching about the steps of adoption because I will know what families have to go through emotionally at each step


  7. Michelle Michelle says:

    I appreciated the raw, authentic, honesty of the author however I did not find that I enjoyed the book as much as I hoped to Obviously, as a memoir Jessica O Dwyer is sharing her experience and portraying that experience of a Guatemalan US adoption as she lived it I, therefore do not find fault in the actual story.Perhaps, it was because I read this book as a woman who has considered adoption and wanted to knowabout it I knew there was corruption, and obviously we cannot expect to find I appreciated the raw, authentic, honesty of the author however I did not find that I enjoyed the book as much as I hoped to Obviously, as a memoir Jessica O Dwyer is sharing her experience and portraying that experience of a Guatemalan US adoption as she lived it I, therefore do not find fault in the actual story.Perhaps, it was because I read this book as a woman who has considered adoption and wanted to knowabout it I knew there was corruption, and obviously we cannot expect to find the same level of ethics and integrity when confronted with cultural, political landscapes and economic realities that are different from the N American experience however this book and the authors experience really made it glaringly obvious as to how much of a business international adoption has become And THAT is was turned me off I found it utterly heartbreaking to really try and relate to the emotional turmoil that the adoptive families go through, and how the birth mothers and those responsible for carrying for the children prior to adoption must feel during the adoption process And then I considered how all of these decisions drastically impact the life of a baby who is utterly oblivious to the decisions that are taking place around him and her and how those decisions will literally change every detail about the type of life they will live.and it s completely overwhelming My respect for all those parents, birth and adoptive has grown exponentially Adoption is absolutely not for everyone and those that are considering adoption really need to read as many memoirs as possible in order to immerse themselves in the subject in order to make the most informed choice possible


  8. Rosa Folgar Rosa Folgar says:

    I m still not sure how I feel about this book It is the first book I ve ever read about my country and its heartbreaking depiction of the maya indigenous and the poor remind me why I think it is a good story and I admire the author for tenacity and her honesty, but at the same time, I found it judge mental and I resent her.As I read the last pages and get to the end, I see the picture of Olivia and she looks just like my sister Our parents were there for the civil war and we were some of thos I m still not sure how I feel about this book It is the first book I ve ever read about my country and its heartbreaking depiction of the maya indigenous and the poor remind me why I think it is a good story and I admire the author for tenacity and her honesty, but at the same time, I found it judge mental and I resent her.As I read the last pages and get to the end, I see the picture of Olivia and she looks just like my sister Our parents were there for the civil war and we were some of those who sought refuge in the US in the 80 s my relatives still live there in those mountains and walk those dirt roads and I guess it hit a little too close for comfort.I do recommend the book if you are looking for information and experience with adoption I am glad Jessica never gave up on Olivia and I think it s wonderful she works so hard to make sure Olivia knows she is adopted but also loved and that she even found the birth mother and grandmother.In our culture, the older women who take care of us get the total of mama name My own grandmothers are mama Gina and mama Angelita That Ana was the one to give her the mamalita name was beautiful


  9. Louise Louise says:

    MY REVIEW Seal Press October 19, 2010 Trade Paperback ISBN 978 1 58005 334 1Jessica O Dwyer is the adoptive mother of two children born in Guatemala, Olivia and, Mateo.Jessica and her doctor husband went to hell and back trying to get their daughter out of Guatemala It wasn t the most pleasant experience of their lives Dealing with corrupt people, knowing who to trust and who not to trust was one of their biggest hurdles From lost documentation to cover ups it didn t seem as though this coup MY REVIEW Seal Press October 19, 2010 Trade Paperback ISBN 978 1 58005 334 1Jessica O Dwyer is the adoptive mother of two children born in Guatemala, Olivia and, Mateo.Jessica and her doctor husband went to hell and back trying to get their daughter out of Guatemala It wasn t the most pleasant experience of their lives Dealing with corrupt people, knowing who to trust and who not to trust was one of their biggest hurdles From lost documentation to cover ups it didn t seem as though this couple was ever going to get Olivia home to America The strength and courage they showed in the face of adversity and threats was humbling Jessica eventually moved to Guatemala to live there with Olivia in the hope of expediting the process but it still took over a year to get her out of the country The reading was riveting and I read this book in one sitting, it was an amazing story to say the least I commend them both on their dedication, motivation, and stamina to stay with the program against all odds No matter what was thrown up in their faces, they trudged on and found a way through the muck and mire Exceptional memoir


  10. Jamie Jamie says:

    This is a seriously great and unique book If you are interested in adoption, international travel, or Latin American culture, this will be a book to enjoy Mamalita offered unique insight into the increasingly controversial practice of international adoption The author is exceedingly brave in being extremely open about her adoption experience She wasn t afraid to air some unflattering information about herself If you love the complicated and fascinating country of Guatemala, you will also lo This is a seriously great and unique book If you are interested in adoption, international travel, or Latin American culture, this will be a book to enjoy Mamalita offered unique insight into the increasingly controversial practice of international adoption The author is exceedingly brave in being extremely open about her adoption experience She wasn t afraid to air some unflattering information about herself If you love the complicated and fascinating country of Guatemala, you will also love this book You ll love traveling around with the author to Tikal, Atitlan, and Antigua Her insight into political and racial relations in Guatamala is interesting and accurate In the end it s a touching story about a woman willing to do anything for her daughter The final pages left me in tears


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