Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth

Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth


Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth ❮EPUB❯ ✼ Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth ✷ Author Edward Winslow – Polishdarling.co.uk Originally printed in , this is the first published account of the coming of the Pilgrims to the New World to settle Plymouth Plantation originally printed in A Journal PDF/EPUB Â , this is the first published account of the coming of the Pilgrims to the New World to settle Plymouth Plantation.


10 thoughts on “Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth

  1. Karen Karen says:

    A quiet and unusual glimpse of early Puritan experiences in New England, including some dubious interactions with the people who were already residents God Providence plays a major role.


  2. Joyce Joyce says:

    This is a key primary document of 17th century Massachusetts It is a nearly day by day account of the first year or so of Plymouth Plantation It makes a nice companion to On Plymouth Plantation because it is day by day the latter title ends up focusing on the legal struggles that the colony underwent fascinating to be sure, but the many adventures and setbacks that the colony faced in its earliest days are not gone into One interesting thing, though On Plymouth Plantation talks about This is a key primary document of 17th century Massachusetts It is a nearly day by day account of the first year or so of Plymouth Plantation It makes a nice companion to On Plymouth Plantation because it is day by day the latter title ends up focusing on the legal struggles that the colony underwent fascinating to be sure, but the many adventures and setbacks that the colony faced in its earliest days are not gone into One interesting thing, though On Plymouth Plantation talks about the sickness and deaths of that first winter, when half of the Pilgrims died, and Mourt barely mentions it


  3. Jeffrey Williams Jeffrey Williams says:

    Edward Winslow recorded his experiences in Plymouth Colony in the early 17th century and that forms the basis for this book It is not complicated reading and tells the story of the early English based Massachusetts settlers who landed at Plymouth As it is a primary source document from the early 17th century, this tells the story from the English perspective and their outlook on the interaction with the Wampanoag Indians It is told in the context of the bias in which it was written.


  4. Brit Brit says:

    This is a delightful little volume The longest letter, A Relation or Journal of the Proceedings of the Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England is a fascinating account of their journeys in and around Plymouth after first landing in November of 1620 The editor did a great job of footnoting when needing without overwhelming the reader with notes.


  5. Roger Lansing Roger Lansing says:

    Having recently discovered a direct line of descendency from the Pilgrims at Plymouth, and in particular to George Morton, I have been reading as much as I can about the lives of those people This is a short read, but full of interesting stories about life in the new world in the 1620s.


  6. Tleary Tleary says:

    Amazing first hand account of the earliest days of Plymouth.


  7. Kari Kari says:

    I realize it s weird to enjoy reading 17th century English, but it was fun There were moments of humor like William Bradford stepping into a deer trap , and cringing an old woman lamenting that her three sons were all enslaved by the previous Englishmen who had come , and I learned a lot about the group who came over on the Mayflower.


  8. Particle_Person Particle_Person says:

    This is one of the few primary sources for the founding of the Plymouth colony, and the first 3 4 of it reads like an adventure novel Since it s the Pilgrims in their own words, it s a novel with an unreliable narrator and all the ugly biases inherited by English people of that period It s most interesting when you see them struggling with the morality of things like digging up the corn the Indians buried with their dead they knew it was wrong, but the text makes clear they were already half This is one of the few primary sources for the founding of the Plymouth colony, and the first 3 4 of it reads like an adventure novel Since it s the Pilgrims in their own words, it s a novel with an unreliable narrator and all the ugly biases inherited by English people of that period It s most interesting when you see them struggling with the morality of things like digging up the corn the Indians buried with their dead they knew it was wrong, but the text makes clear they were already half starved and other less justifiable offenses The last part of the book is an argument for the existence of the colony It is sanctimonious rubbish, but valuable for the arguments AGAINST settlement that they felt the need to refute For instance, apparently some people had the silly idea that the natives owned their land But fome will fay, what right haue I to goe liue in the heathens countrie , and it was necessary to refute this by explaining what a great GOOD could be done for the Indians by converting them to Christianity, c., c That the Pilgrims made those arguments is unsurprising, but I was startled that there were apparently a few voices of reason even at the time, enough that they felt the need to build a case


  9. Dwight Dwight says:

    arranged business affairs for the Pilgrims, so he had a vested interest in seeing the enterprise in the New World succeed While making sure the relations got published, his introduction downplays the hardships faced first attempts prove difficult while stressing potential earnings from such an investment His three hopes for the undertaking are the furtherance of the kingdom Christ, the enlarging of the bounds of our sovereign lord King Jame arranged business affairs for the Pilgrims, so he had a vested interest in seeing the enterprise in the New World succeed While making sure the relations got published, his introduction downplays the hardships faced first attempts prove difficult while stressing potential earnings from such an investment His three hopes for the undertaking are the furtherance of the kingdom Christ, the enlarging of the bounds of our sovereign lord King James, and the good and profit of those who, either by purse or person or both, are agents in the same William Bradford and Edward Winslow might stress different things in their sections, but Morton and Robert Cushman see the last section consistently hit these points.More detail on the other relations at the link


  10. Melissa Guimont Melissa Guimont says:

    When I read this book it s like I stepped back in time and went to the beginning of the pilgrim s journey into this North American land It is a first hand account of the adventures they had and the dangers they faced when they were establishing their colonies It is also a great historical account of the Wampanoag tribes in the area and their interaction with these strangers It makes you appreciate our modern life muchreading about the struggles they faced.


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10 thoughts on “Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth

  1. Karen Karen says:

    A quiet and unusual glimpse of early Puritan experiences in New England, including some dubious interactions with the people who were already residents God Providence plays a major role.


  2. Joyce Joyce says:

    This is a key primary document of 17th century Massachusetts It is a nearly day by day account of the first year or so of Plymouth Plantation It makes a nice companion to On Plymouth Plantation because it is day by day the latter title ends up focusing on the legal struggles that the colony underwent fascinating to be sure, but the many adventures and setbacks that the colony faced in its earliest days are not gone into One interesting thing, though On Plymouth Plantation talks about This is a key primary document of 17th century Massachusetts It is a nearly day by day account of the first year or so of Plymouth Plantation It makes a nice companion to On Plymouth Plantation because it is day by day the latter title ends up focusing on the legal struggles that the colony underwent fascinating to be sure, but the many adventures and setbacks that the colony faced in its earliest days are not gone into One interesting thing, though On Plymouth Plantation talks about the sickness and deaths of that first winter, when half of the Pilgrims died, and Mourt barely mentions it


  3. Jeffrey Williams Jeffrey Williams says:

    Edward Winslow recorded his experiences in Plymouth Colony in the early 17th century and that forms the basis for this book It is not complicated reading and tells the story of the early English based Massachusetts settlers who landed at Plymouth As it is a primary source document from the early 17th century, this tells the story from the English perspective and their outlook on the interaction with the Wampanoag Indians It is told in the context of the bias in which it was written.


  4. Brit Brit says:

    This is a delightful little volume The longest letter, A Relation or Journal of the Proceedings of the Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England is a fascinating account of their journeys in and around Plymouth after first landing in November of 1620 The editor did a great job of footnoting when needing without overwhelming the reader with notes.


  5. Roger Lansing Roger Lansing says:

    Having recently discovered a direct line of descendency from the Pilgrims at Plymouth, and in particular to George Morton, I have been reading as much as I can about the lives of those people This is a short read, but full of interesting stories about life in the new world in the 1620s.


  6. Tleary Tleary says:

    Amazing first hand account of the earliest days of Plymouth.


  7. Kari Kari says:

    I realize it s weird to enjoy reading 17th century English, but it was fun There were moments of humor like William Bradford stepping into a deer trap , and cringing an old woman lamenting that her three sons were all enslaved by the previous Englishmen who had come , and I learned a lot about the group who came over on the Mayflower.


  8. Particle_Person Particle_Person says:

    This is one of the few primary sources for the founding of the Plymouth colony, and the first 3 4 of it reads like an adventure novel Since it s the Pilgrims in their own words, it s a novel with an unreliable narrator and all the ugly biases inherited by English people of that period It s most interesting when you see them struggling with the morality of things like digging up the corn the Indians buried with their dead they knew it was wrong, but the text makes clear they were already half This is one of the few primary sources for the founding of the Plymouth colony, and the first 3 4 of it reads like an adventure novel Since it s the Pilgrims in their own words, it s a novel with an unreliable narrator and all the ugly biases inherited by English people of that period It s most interesting when you see them struggling with the morality of things like digging up the corn the Indians buried with their dead they knew it was wrong, but the text makes clear they were already half starved and other less justifiable offenses The last part of the book is an argument for the existence of the colony It is sanctimonious rubbish, but valuable for the arguments AGAINST settlement that they felt the need to refute For instance, apparently some people had the silly idea that the natives owned their land But fome will fay, what right haue I to goe liue in the heathens countrie , and it was necessary to refute this by explaining what a great GOOD could be done for the Indians by converting them to Christianity, c., c That the Pilgrims made those arguments is unsurprising, but I was startled that there were apparently a few voices of reason even at the time, enough that they felt the need to build a case


  9. Dwight Dwight says:

    arranged business affairs for the Pilgrims, so he had a vested interest in seeing the enterprise in the New World succeed While making sure the relations got published, his introduction downplays the hardships faced first attempts prove difficult while stressing potential earnings from such an investment His three hopes for the undertaking are the furtherance of the kingdom Christ, the enlarging of the bounds of our sovereign lord King Jame arranged business affairs for the Pilgrims, so he had a vested interest in seeing the enterprise in the New World succeed While making sure the relations got published, his introduction downplays the hardships faced first attempts prove difficult while stressing potential earnings from such an investment His three hopes for the undertaking are the furtherance of the kingdom Christ, the enlarging of the bounds of our sovereign lord King James, and the good and profit of those who, either by purse or person or both, are agents in the same William Bradford and Edward Winslow might stress different things in their sections, but Morton and Robert Cushman see the last section consistently hit these points.More detail on the other relations at the link


  10. Melissa Guimont Melissa Guimont says:

    When I read this book it s like I stepped back in time and went to the beginning of the pilgrim s journey into this North American land It is a first hand account of the adventures they had and the dangers they faced when they were establishing their colonies It is also a great historical account of the Wampanoag tribes in the area and their interaction with these strangers It makes you appreciate our modern life muchreading about the struggles they faced.


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