The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran

The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran PDF

The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran [KINDLE] ❁ The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran ❄ Homayon Katouzian – Polishdarling.co.uk In recent years, Iran has gained attention mostly for negative reasons its authoritarian religious government, disputed nuclear program, and controversial role in the Middle East but there is much to In Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern PDF/EPUB or recent years, Iran has gained attention Ancient, Mediaeval eBook ´ mostly for negative reasons its authoritarian religious government, disputed nuclear program, and controversial role in the Middle East but there is much to the story of this ancient land than can be gleaned from the news This authoritative and comprehensive history of Iran, written by Homa Katouzian, an acclaimed The Persians: PDF or expert, covers the entire history of the area from the ancient Persian Empire to today s Iranian stateWriting from an Iranian rather than a European perspective, Katouzian integrates the significant cultural and literary history of Iran with its political and social history Some of the greatest poets of human history wrote in Persian among them Rumi, Omar Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval PDF Ê Khayyam, and Saadi and Katouzian discusses and occasionally quotes their work In his thoughtful analysis of Iranian society, Katouzian argues that the absolute and arbitrary power traditionally enjoyed by Persian Iranian rulers has resulted in an unstable society where fear and short term thinking dominate A magisterial history, this book also serves as an excellent background to the role of Iran in the contemporary world.


About the Author: Homayon Katouzian

Is Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern PDF/EPUB or a well known author, some of Ancient, Mediaeval eBook ´ his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran book, this is one of the most wanted Homayon Katouzian author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran

  1. Ahmed Ahmed says:

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  2. عمر الحمادي عمر الحمادي says:


  3. Maha. ALyazedi Maha. ALyazedi says:

    __


  4. Bob Newman Bob Newman says:

    14 chapters in search of an editorTo connect a serious book of Persian history to modern Chinese science fiction might seem like putting octopus with chocolate ice cream, but my mind, admittedly rotted out by too much MAD magazine in my wasted youth, kept drifting in that direction as I read THE PERSIANS The author s main theme, reiterated often, is that Iran s history is one in which arbitrary rulers are continually opposed by society If out of chaos a strong man ascended to power, then peopl 14 chapters in search of an editorTo connect a serious book of Persian history to modern Chinese science fiction might seem like putting octopus with chocolate ice cream, but my mind, admittedly rotted out by too much MAD magazine in my wasted youth, kept drifting in that direction as I read THE PERSIANS The author s main theme, reiterated often, is that Iran s history is one in which arbitrary rulers are continually opposed by society If out of chaos a strong man ascended to power, then people accepted him as being the chosen one , but his arbitrary rule, without any legal structure, could always be undermined When the current arbitrary ruler died or was toppled, there would be a chaotic period as successors fought among themselves for the top position Apt or not, this definitely reminded me of Liu Cixin s Three Body Problem in which a planet affected by two suns went through Chaotic Periods and Stable Periods Iran Persia went through this pattern of instability for a couple of thousand years There was no feudal period, argues Katouzian, because rulers could and did confiscate any and all property at any time, kill or exile the erstwhile owners As a result very few properties could be passed from one generation to the next This applied to the monarchy as well the first six or seven chapters read like a list of family murders and blindings of brothers, uncles, and sons These are chaotic periods for you, the reader, as well, because it is nigh impossible to keep track of all the characters, most of whom appear on only one page It was, he says, a short term society echoing unknowingly the Chinese novel again OK, if you are someone who plans to study Persian history in detail, all this might be useful to some degree, but for a serious reader, not to mention a casual reader, all this is way too much It is like a litany of royal changes, revolts, battles, and invasions by various peoples, with occasional mentions of poetry or painting tacked on at the end of each chapter An editor was sorely needed Arbitrary rule continued right up to the 20th century, until an early revolution attempted to bring in some legal framework in 1905 06 The result of centuries of such rule was, the author says, that society in Iran always opposed the ruler Each side tried to rule exclusively The rise of Reza Shah Pahlavi who gained the throne in 1926 ended a Chaotic Period and ushered in a Stable one, but soon society opposed his arbitrary rule His son, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, kept on his throne thanks to British and American direct interference, becameandarbitrary and was toppled, as we all know, by a giant popular movement led by the Ayatollah Khomeini Once he ascended to power by nearly universal acclaim, he had to crush various factions which fought among themselves as well Whether the government of the Islamic Republic will be eventually repudiated by the Iranian people remains to be seen, but there are signs of unrest Their willingness to mow down demonstrators, their history of executions and driving people into exile certainly echoes earlier periods in Persian history In short, the author says, The Iranian example is stark evidence against Eurocentric universalist theories of history p.325 He tries to show repeatedly how in the West one class lower overthrew the regime of another upper , but in Iran, the whole society overthrew arbitrary rule and its enforcing agencies The chapters on the 20th and early 21st centuries are farreadable, but still, I felt a stricter editor would have pared down the mass of details The large number of misspellings evidence the missing editor, as well as the mix of transcription styles Farsi, Arabic, and English In short, you can definitely learn something from THE PERSIANS if you are persistent enough, but it s a tough trot


  5. Sith Lancerlot Sith Lancerlot says:

    .


  6. Bahman Bahman Bahman Bahman says:

    1 257 13201 257 1320 265 1327 2 259 3 261 1321 1322 1321 1322 .4 262 .5 262 1324 24 1324 .6 262 .7 262.8 263 24 1325 .9 264 1324 1326 .10 264 1325 23 1325 .11 265.12 266 1261 13461345 1346.13 267 .14 268 1328 1327 .15 270 133029 .16 273.17 279 1333133418 281.19 284 520.000 138 97


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10 thoughts on “The Persians: Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Iran

  1. Ahmed Ahmed says:

    .


  2. عمر الحمادي عمر الحمادي says:


  3. Maha. ALyazedi Maha. ALyazedi says:

    __


  4. Bob Newman Bob Newman says:

    14 chapters in search of an editorTo connect a serious book of Persian history to modern Chinese science fiction might seem like putting octopus with chocolate ice cream, but my mind, admittedly rotted out by too much MAD magazine in my wasted youth, kept drifting in that direction as I read THE PERSIANS The author s main theme, reiterated often, is that Iran s history is one in which arbitrary rulers are continually opposed by society If out of chaos a strong man ascended to power, then peopl 14 chapters in search of an editorTo connect a serious book of Persian history to modern Chinese science fiction might seem like putting octopus with chocolate ice cream, but my mind, admittedly rotted out by too much MAD magazine in my wasted youth, kept drifting in that direction as I read THE PERSIANS The author s main theme, reiterated often, is that Iran s history is one in which arbitrary rulers are continually opposed by society If out of chaos a strong man ascended to power, then people accepted him as being the chosen one , but his arbitrary rule, without any legal structure, could always be undermined When the current arbitrary ruler died or was toppled, there would be a chaotic period as successors fought among themselves for the top position Apt or not, this definitely reminded me of Liu Cixin s Three Body Problem in which a planet affected by two suns went through Chaotic Periods and Stable Periods Iran Persia went through this pattern of instability for a couple of thousand years There was no feudal period, argues Katouzian, because rulers could and did confiscate any and all property at any time, kill or exile the erstwhile owners As a result very few properties could be passed from one generation to the next This applied to the monarchy as well the first six or seven chapters read like a list of family murders and blindings of brothers, uncles, and sons These are chaotic periods for you, the reader, as well, because it is nigh impossible to keep track of all the characters, most of whom appear on only one page It was, he says, a short term society echoing unknowingly the Chinese novel again OK, if you are someone who plans to study Persian history in detail, all this might be useful to some degree, but for a serious reader, not to mention a casual reader, all this is way too much It is like a litany of royal changes, revolts, battles, and invasions by various peoples, with occasional mentions of poetry or painting tacked on at the end of each chapter An editor was sorely needed Arbitrary rule continued right up to the 20th century, until an early revolution attempted to bring in some legal framework in 1905 06 The result of centuries of such rule was, the author says, that society in Iran always opposed the ruler Each side tried to rule exclusively The rise of Reza Shah Pahlavi who gained the throne in 1926 ended a Chaotic Period and ushered in a Stable one, but soon society opposed his arbitrary rule His son, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, kept on his throne thanks to British and American direct interference, becameandarbitrary and was toppled, as we all know, by a giant popular movement led by the Ayatollah Khomeini Once he ascended to power by nearly universal acclaim, he had to crush various factions which fought among themselves as well Whether the government of the Islamic Republic will be eventually repudiated by the Iranian people remains to be seen, but there are signs of unrest Their willingness to mow down demonstrators, their history of executions and driving people into exile certainly echoes earlier periods in Persian history In short, the author says, The Iranian example is stark evidence against Eurocentric universalist theories of history p.325 He tries to show repeatedly how in the West one class lower overthrew the regime of another upper , but in Iran, the whole society overthrew arbitrary rule and its enforcing agencies The chapters on the 20th and early 21st centuries are farreadable, but still, I felt a stricter editor would have pared down the mass of details The large number of misspellings evidence the missing editor, as well as the mix of transcription styles Farsi, Arabic, and English In short, you can definitely learn something from THE PERSIANS if you are persistent enough, but it s a tough trot


  5. Sith Lancerlot Sith Lancerlot says:

    .


  6. Bahman Bahman Bahman Bahman says:

    1 257 13201 257 1320 265 1327 2 259 3 261 1321 1322 1321 1322 .4 262 .5 262 1324 24 1324 .6 262 .7 262.8 263 24 1325 .9 264 1324 1326 .10 264 1325 23 1325 .11 265.12 266 1261 13461345 1346.13 267 .14 268 1328 1327 .15 270 133029 .16 273.17 279 1333133418 281.19 284 520.000 138 97


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