The Life of Milarepa

The Life of Milarepa PDF/EPUB ↠ The Life ePUB

The Life of Milarepa [Read] ➱ The Life of Milarepa By Tsangnyön Heruka – Polishdarling.co.uk The Life of Milarepa is one of the most beloved stories of the Tibetan people and a great literary example of the contemplative life This biography, a dramatic tale from a culture now in crisis, can b The Life of Milarepa is one of the most beloved stories of the Tibetan people and a great literary example of the contemplative life This biography, a dramatic tale from The Life ePUB Ù a culture now in crisis, can be read on several levels A personal and moving introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, it is also a detailed guide to the search for liberation It presents a quest for purification and buddhahood in a single lifetime, tracing the path of a great sinner who became a great saint It is also a powerfully evocative narrative, full of magic, miracles, suspense, and humor, while reflecting the religious and social life of medieval Tibet.


10 thoughts on “The Life of Milarepa

  1. Nancy Eister Nancy Eister says:

    A most amazing story, of how a black magic practitioner and murderer became a living saint , or bodhisattva Not by being good, but by being truly himself Among Milarepa s many attributes such as living on a diet of nettles til his skin turned green the best is that instead of preaching he sang, thousands of beautiful, heartful songs the very tones of which changed reality A deep spiritual read before sleep, for lovers of Tibetan Buddhist lore.


  2. Red Red says:

    The first time that I read someting relating to Milarepa was in the novel The sea the sea by Iris Murdoch A bit curious I tried to find something but that was hard at that time Now that has changed and information can be found I think that the book gives a good impression of the life of Milarepa.


  3. Matt Harris Matt Harris says:

    Mila was the original bad boy, cast black magic spells for the hell of it, generally nailed his karma as much as possible, killed, lied, stole, he did it allThe story of his moments of truth, conversion to Buddhism and then subsequent roads to great master and inspirational teacher is very exciting, full of surprise, and even shot through with songs, since he was able to spontaneously compose and sing poems.Anyone who thinks their karma is way too far gone to look at any religion should read Mila was the original bad boy, cast black magic spells for the hell of it, generally nailed his karma as much as possible, killed, lied, stole, he did it allThe story of his moments of truth, conversion to Buddhism and then subsequent roads to great master and inspirational teacher is very exciting, full of surprise, and even shot through with songs, since he was able to spontaneously compose and sing poems.Anyone who thinks their karma is way too far gone to look at any religion should read this book You ll have an inspiration Thank you to Jacqui who bought this for my 30th birthday


  4. Jamy Jamy says:

    You know how we sometimes slip into a deep and excited conversation so that you are saying gravity isn t real because Issac Newton also believed in alchemy and half the population of astrophysicists in the world who didn t make time to attend their mother s funeral will commit seppuku when they finally find definite proof that gravity isn t actually a fundamental force and your friend replies that that s straight out of a Rick and Morty episode but you ignore that to say Albert Einstein was wron You know how we sometimes slip into a deep and excited conversation so that you are saying gravity isn t real because Issac Newton also believed in alchemy and half the population of astrophysicists in the world who didn t make time to attend their mother s funeral will commit seppuku when they finally find definite proof that gravity isn t actually a fundamental force and your friend replies that that s straight out of a Rick and Morty episode but you ignore that to say Albert Einstein was wrong too because time isn t real either so that your friend rolls his eyes and asks as to what things are real, and you answer that nothing is, everything is human made and that it sure sounds like nihilism but it s totally true because Buddha himself taught one should question everything and come to one s own conclusion to which your friend shakes his head and gives you a look as if to regard you an utter disappointment to have thus far housed a human brain, says you have got it all ass up, and questions as to the kind of books have you been reading lately, but you also notice he is working himself up to that rabid mania in which he feverishly lectures you on religion and morality and there seldom seems to be escape so you quickly blurt out, Do you know what this country needs Black magic , to which he excitedly answers, Dude, sod all bureaucrats That s exactly what we need How did you know , and then the talk devolves into how the two of you will learn black magic but agree that it will only be used for good so that the two of you will be worshipped as modern day gods with the entire planet in the palm of your hands No Me neither.Well, at least one thing s for certain I did read this thinking why not go to the big man himself for my foray into black magic, which isn t exactly what he was going for when he narrated his life story but fortunately I finished this book to my utter disappointment I learned just the two words of incantation which has thus far failed to show any signs of black magic On the other hand my friend has contracted a cold, so Anyways, so much for my future as a young, handsome, up and coming talent in the black magic scene


  5. Craig Werner Craig Werner says:

    A translation of a biography of one of the great gurus of the Kargyupta strain of Buddhism The biography is presented in the voice of Milrepa s student Rechung, so it s very much from the inside of the story something like the gospels in the New Testament, though Rechung presents himself as eyewitness to the later years of Milrepa s life The two stars aren t for the material Milrepa certainly has a place among the world s great religious figures The problems are two fold First, the focus o A translation of a biography of one of the great gurus of the Kargyupta strain of Buddhism The biography is presented in the voice of Milrepa s student Rechung, so it s very much from the inside of the story something like the gospels in the New Testament, though Rechung presents himself as eyewitness to the later years of Milrepa s life The two stars aren t for the material Milrepa certainly has a place among the world s great religious figures The problems are two fold First, the focus of the material is very much on the external events in some ways it schronicle than biography Those are interesting enough, but there s very little concerning Milrepa s thought or deeper understanding of Buddhism He repeatedly exhorts relatives and people he encounters to embrace the path of asceticism and we re told that he s initiated into the inner meanings and mysteries, but there s very little that s not common knowledge to anyone who s paid any attention at all to Buddhism Clearly, to reveal the secrets would have been unthinkable for Rechung, but it does tend to put the emphasis on the externals.Second, while Evans Entz, an Oxford don who worked in the early 20th century, is clearly motivated by a commitment to deep scholarship and profound respect for his subject, his presentation of the translation is deeply embedded in western preconceptions He repeatedly draws analogies between Buddhism and Christianity which are at best strained and I distrust the vocabulary he uses in the translation there are way too many points at which Buddhism is presented as a matter of faith and belief in ways that echo Christian theology A lesser problem is the type size on the footnotes, where Evans Wentz presents much of the philosophical depth that s not present in the text itself At some point, I quit reading them because I m familiar withrecent work that covers much of the same ground.Certainly not a waste, but I d imagine there are better books on Milarepa available today


  6. Lisa Lisa says:

    I ve read this book already once and will doubtless read it again in a few years A wonderful glimpse not only into Milarepa s life but also into the mind of his amazing teacher Marpa It takes a certain kind of strength to be a good teacher, and Marpa was perfect in the role of Milarepa s teacher Wonderful stuff.


  7. John John says:

    Biography of the great Tibetan saint, revered for traveling from the depths of anguish and sin to the heights of enlightened Buddhahood in one lifetime It wasn t easy though After vengefully murdering over 30 relatives and villagers, Mila s repentance was many years of harsh discipline under the stern guidance of his gura, Marpa the Translator Beatings, humiliations and seemingly meaningless and endless work projects were the punishment Mila had to persevere through to purge himself of his Biography of the great Tibetan saint, revered for traveling from the depths of anguish and sin to the heights of enlightened Buddhahood in one lifetime It wasn t easy though After vengefully murdering over 30 relatives and villagers, Mila s repentance was many years of harsh discipline under the stern guidance of his gura, Marpa the Translator Beatings, humiliations and seemingly meaningless and endless work projects were the punishment Mila had to persevere through to purge himself of his evil karma Then years and years in solitary meditation in snowy mountain caves, surviving only on shrubs and pine needles thus many paintings of Mila depict him with green skin Milarepa also taught by song, and composed thousands of song poems some are quite beautiful, but this translation seems to make them a bit stilted I hope to pilgrimage someday in Mila s old haunts, the Tibetan Tsum Valley


  8. Graham Graham says:

    The first six chapters of this book tells the macabre story of Milarepa s trials to gain initiation into Marpa s dharma teachings, including the stone tower building episode in chapter five, one of the most famous scenes in world religion literature The latter half is colored by his famous poems The last chapter could stand on its own as a single short work Tibetans often wrote better literature than philosophy, here s some of the best, it s literature it s not self help or philosophy or reli The first six chapters of this book tells the macabre story of Milarepa s trials to gain initiation into Marpa s dharma teachings, including the stone tower building episode in chapter five, one of the most famous scenes in world religion literature The latter half is colored by his famous poems The last chapter could stand on its own as a single short work Tibetans often wrote better literature than philosophy, here s some of the best, it s literature it s not self help or philosophy or religion It s literature, and it should be read as such This should be seen along its true peers Paradise Lost, Crime and Punishment, The Diven Comedies


  9. Shashidhar Shashidhar says:

    Very much Interested to read


  10. Bernie Gourley Bernie Gourley says:

    Superhero stories can be surprisingly hard to make interesting The hero s vast powers make it hard to build obstacles that seriously challenge him Make no mistake while this book may be the biography of a Tibetan Buddhist yogi who was born in the eleventh century, it s a superhero story as well At various points, the titular character can control the weather, fly, read minds, predict the future, and cover a distance that would take a mere mortal months in just days Milarepa is basically the Superhero stories can be surprisingly hard to make interesting The hero s vast powers make it hard to build obstacles that seriously challenge him Make no mistake while this book may be the biography of a Tibetan Buddhist yogi who was born in the eleventh century, it s a superhero story as well At various points, the titular character can control the weather, fly, read minds, predict the future, and cover a distance that would take a mere mortal months in just days Milarepa is basically the entire cast of the X Men rolled into one monk Note the introduction of 1962 Lobzang Jivaka edition features a series of rants against Westerners that put a bad taste in my mouth early in the reading basically suggesting the reality of these magic powers should be taken as a given even though the deficient Western mind has trouble wrapping its head around difficult concepts It made me think I d probably not like the book, but I d forgotten it by the time I got around to the end of the book The Life of Milarepa is essentially a hero s journey, which begins with his widowed mother, his sister, and he being taken advantage of by a mean Uncle and Aunt Milarepa takes up Black Magic to influence the weather so that he can exact revenge Doing so makes him feel great shame, and puts him on the path of a religious ascetic After his initial training, he is put through a great series of trials by Marpa, the man who will eventually his guru Were it not for the encouragement and support from Marpa s wife, Milarepa would never have made it through the training, and at one point in fact he goes away to learn from one of Marpa s most advanced students because it seems Marpa unwilling to teach him Eventually, Milarepa ends up returning to his home and, thereafter, meditating on his own Here he runs into the aunt and uncle now separated who made his family s life hell after his father died These elders aren t the only ones who think Milarepa is a ne er do well However, most people are too scared of his superpowers to create problems for him, at first He eventually wanders off and becomes the poorest of ascetics with not so much as covering for his naked body as he live off nettles There are oddities in the book The Buddhist teachers he studies under both use him as weapon i.e his hailstorm magic as a requirement to taking him on as a student, despite the fact that this will pile onto his Karmic debt and ostensibly theirs , and it leaves him feeling horrible as well, it seems, these black magic powers make Marpa hostile to the young man and not take him seriously as a student until the guru receives an omen So why does this story turn out to be so satisfying For one thing, for all his powers, Milarepa is constantly confronting challenges that keep the story tight I should again emphasize that this is nominally a work of biography It just doesn t read like one because of all the magic and the classic story elements Few people have such a novel shaped life A hagiography is aapt descriptor but instead of only displaying Milarepa s good side boring , this book presumably dances around facts to make aengrossing product While Milarepa could concoct all manner of magic, he mostly doesn t with the exception of some ESP After Marpa has taught him, Milarepa deals with people with calm and compassion His return home is a little like Alex s from A Clockwork Orange in that people have ill feelings about him because of his past, but at first they are afraid of him When they discover he can t defend himself, they start to lay into him For another, we can see Milarepa s growth and we come to respect his intense devotion tremendously as he becomes quite virtuous of the course of the book While he is a superhero, he s also an ascetic who denies himself with the utmost of discipline in pursuit of liberation I d highly recommend this book for those who like biographies especially if you like to learn about Buddhism in the process In the latter half of the book there are some lessons transmitted through the text as Milarepa interacts with students and other people Eventually, even his loathsome aunt becomes a student


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10 thoughts on “The Life of Milarepa

  1. Nancy Eister Nancy Eister says:

    A most amazing story, of how a black magic practitioner and murderer became a living saint , or bodhisattva Not by being good, but by being truly himself Among Milarepa s many attributes such as living on a diet of nettles til his skin turned green the best is that instead of preaching he sang, thousands of beautiful, heartful songs the very tones of which changed reality A deep spiritual read before sleep, for lovers of Tibetan Buddhist lore.


  2. Red Red says:

    The first time that I read someting relating to Milarepa was in the novel The sea the sea by Iris Murdoch A bit curious I tried to find something but that was hard at that time Now that has changed and information can be found I think that the book gives a good impression of the life of Milarepa.


  3. Matt Harris Matt Harris says:

    Mila was the original bad boy, cast black magic spells for the hell of it, generally nailed his karma as much as possible, killed, lied, stole, he did it allThe story of his moments of truth, conversion to Buddhism and then subsequent roads to great master and inspirational teacher is very exciting, full of surprise, and even shot through with songs, since he was able to spontaneously compose and sing poems.Anyone who thinks their karma is way too far gone to look at any religion should read Mila was the original bad boy, cast black magic spells for the hell of it, generally nailed his karma as much as possible, killed, lied, stole, he did it allThe story of his moments of truth, conversion to Buddhism and then subsequent roads to great master and inspirational teacher is very exciting, full of surprise, and even shot through with songs, since he was able to spontaneously compose and sing poems.Anyone who thinks their karma is way too far gone to look at any religion should read this book You ll have an inspiration Thank you to Jacqui who bought this for my 30th birthday


  4. Jamy Jamy says:

    You know how we sometimes slip into a deep and excited conversation so that you are saying gravity isn t real because Issac Newton also believed in alchemy and half the population of astrophysicists in the world who didn t make time to attend their mother s funeral will commit seppuku when they finally find definite proof that gravity isn t actually a fundamental force and your friend replies that that s straight out of a Rick and Morty episode but you ignore that to say Albert Einstein was wron You know how we sometimes slip into a deep and excited conversation so that you are saying gravity isn t real because Issac Newton also believed in alchemy and half the population of astrophysicists in the world who didn t make time to attend their mother s funeral will commit seppuku when they finally find definite proof that gravity isn t actually a fundamental force and your friend replies that that s straight out of a Rick and Morty episode but you ignore that to say Albert Einstein was wrong too because time isn t real either so that your friend rolls his eyes and asks as to what things are real, and you answer that nothing is, everything is human made and that it sure sounds like nihilism but it s totally true because Buddha himself taught one should question everything and come to one s own conclusion to which your friend shakes his head and gives you a look as if to regard you an utter disappointment to have thus far housed a human brain, says you have got it all ass up, and questions as to the kind of books have you been reading lately, but you also notice he is working himself up to that rabid mania in which he feverishly lectures you on religion and morality and there seldom seems to be escape so you quickly blurt out, Do you know what this country needs Black magic , to which he excitedly answers, Dude, sod all bureaucrats That s exactly what we need How did you know , and then the talk devolves into how the two of you will learn black magic but agree that it will only be used for good so that the two of you will be worshipped as modern day gods with the entire planet in the palm of your hands No Me neither.Well, at least one thing s for certain I did read this thinking why not go to the big man himself for my foray into black magic, which isn t exactly what he was going for when he narrated his life story but fortunately I finished this book to my utter disappointment I learned just the two words of incantation which has thus far failed to show any signs of black magic On the other hand my friend has contracted a cold, so Anyways, so much for my future as a young, handsome, up and coming talent in the black magic scene


  5. Craig Werner Craig Werner says:

    A translation of a biography of one of the great gurus of the Kargyupta strain of Buddhism The biography is presented in the voice of Milrepa s student Rechung, so it s very much from the inside of the story something like the gospels in the New Testament, though Rechung presents himself as eyewitness to the later years of Milrepa s life The two stars aren t for the material Milrepa certainly has a place among the world s great religious figures The problems are two fold First, the focus o A translation of a biography of one of the great gurus of the Kargyupta strain of Buddhism The biography is presented in the voice of Milrepa s student Rechung, so it s very much from the inside of the story something like the gospels in the New Testament, though Rechung presents himself as eyewitness to the later years of Milrepa s life The two stars aren t for the material Milrepa certainly has a place among the world s great religious figures The problems are two fold First, the focus of the material is very much on the external events in some ways it schronicle than biography Those are interesting enough, but there s very little concerning Milrepa s thought or deeper understanding of Buddhism He repeatedly exhorts relatives and people he encounters to embrace the path of asceticism and we re told that he s initiated into the inner meanings and mysteries, but there s very little that s not common knowledge to anyone who s paid any attention at all to Buddhism Clearly, to reveal the secrets would have been unthinkable for Rechung, but it does tend to put the emphasis on the externals.Second, while Evans Entz, an Oxford don who worked in the early 20th century, is clearly motivated by a commitment to deep scholarship and profound respect for his subject, his presentation of the translation is deeply embedded in western preconceptions He repeatedly draws analogies between Buddhism and Christianity which are at best strained and I distrust the vocabulary he uses in the translation there are way too many points at which Buddhism is presented as a matter of faith and belief in ways that echo Christian theology A lesser problem is the type size on the footnotes, where Evans Wentz presents much of the philosophical depth that s not present in the text itself At some point, I quit reading them because I m familiar withrecent work that covers much of the same ground.Certainly not a waste, but I d imagine there are better books on Milarepa available today


  6. Lisa Lisa says:

    I ve read this book already once and will doubtless read it again in a few years A wonderful glimpse not only into Milarepa s life but also into the mind of his amazing teacher Marpa It takes a certain kind of strength to be a good teacher, and Marpa was perfect in the role of Milarepa s teacher Wonderful stuff.


  7. John John says:

    Biography of the great Tibetan saint, revered for traveling from the depths of anguish and sin to the heights of enlightened Buddhahood in one lifetime It wasn t easy though After vengefully murdering over 30 relatives and villagers, Mila s repentance was many years of harsh discipline under the stern guidance of his gura, Marpa the Translator Beatings, humiliations and seemingly meaningless and endless work projects were the punishment Mila had to persevere through to purge himself of his Biography of the great Tibetan saint, revered for traveling from the depths of anguish and sin to the heights of enlightened Buddhahood in one lifetime It wasn t easy though After vengefully murdering over 30 relatives and villagers, Mila s repentance was many years of harsh discipline under the stern guidance of his gura, Marpa the Translator Beatings, humiliations and seemingly meaningless and endless work projects were the punishment Mila had to persevere through to purge himself of his evil karma Then years and years in solitary meditation in snowy mountain caves, surviving only on shrubs and pine needles thus many paintings of Mila depict him with green skin Milarepa also taught by song, and composed thousands of song poems some are quite beautiful, but this translation seems to make them a bit stilted I hope to pilgrimage someday in Mila s old haunts, the Tibetan Tsum Valley


  8. Graham Graham says:

    The first six chapters of this book tells the macabre story of Milarepa s trials to gain initiation into Marpa s dharma teachings, including the stone tower building episode in chapter five, one of the most famous scenes in world religion literature The latter half is colored by his famous poems The last chapter could stand on its own as a single short work Tibetans often wrote better literature than philosophy, here s some of the best, it s literature it s not self help or philosophy or reli The first six chapters of this book tells the macabre story of Milarepa s trials to gain initiation into Marpa s dharma teachings, including the stone tower building episode in chapter five, one of the most famous scenes in world religion literature The latter half is colored by his famous poems The last chapter could stand on its own as a single short work Tibetans often wrote better literature than philosophy, here s some of the best, it s literature it s not self help or philosophy or religion It s literature, and it should be read as such This should be seen along its true peers Paradise Lost, Crime and Punishment, The Diven Comedies


  9. Shashidhar Shashidhar says:

    Very much Interested to read


  10. Bernie Gourley Bernie Gourley says:

    Superhero stories can be surprisingly hard to make interesting The hero s vast powers make it hard to build obstacles that seriously challenge him Make no mistake while this book may be the biography of a Tibetan Buddhist yogi who was born in the eleventh century, it s a superhero story as well At various points, the titular character can control the weather, fly, read minds, predict the future, and cover a distance that would take a mere mortal months in just days Milarepa is basically the Superhero stories can be surprisingly hard to make interesting The hero s vast powers make it hard to build obstacles that seriously challenge him Make no mistake while this book may be the biography of a Tibetan Buddhist yogi who was born in the eleventh century, it s a superhero story as well At various points, the titular character can control the weather, fly, read minds, predict the future, and cover a distance that would take a mere mortal months in just days Milarepa is basically the entire cast of the X Men rolled into one monk Note the introduction of 1962 Lobzang Jivaka edition features a series of rants against Westerners that put a bad taste in my mouth early in the reading basically suggesting the reality of these magic powers should be taken as a given even though the deficient Western mind has trouble wrapping its head around difficult concepts It made me think I d probably not like the book, but I d forgotten it by the time I got around to the end of the book The Life of Milarepa is essentially a hero s journey, which begins with his widowed mother, his sister, and he being taken advantage of by a mean Uncle and Aunt Milarepa takes up Black Magic to influence the weather so that he can exact revenge Doing so makes him feel great shame, and puts him on the path of a religious ascetic After his initial training, he is put through a great series of trials by Marpa, the man who will eventually his guru Were it not for the encouragement and support from Marpa s wife, Milarepa would never have made it through the training, and at one point in fact he goes away to learn from one of Marpa s most advanced students because it seems Marpa unwilling to teach him Eventually, Milarepa ends up returning to his home and, thereafter, meditating on his own Here he runs into the aunt and uncle now separated who made his family s life hell after his father died These elders aren t the only ones who think Milarepa is a ne er do well However, most people are too scared of his superpowers to create problems for him, at first He eventually wanders off and becomes the poorest of ascetics with not so much as covering for his naked body as he live off nettles There are oddities in the book The Buddhist teachers he studies under both use him as weapon i.e his hailstorm magic as a requirement to taking him on as a student, despite the fact that this will pile onto his Karmic debt and ostensibly theirs , and it leaves him feeling horrible as well, it seems, these black magic powers make Marpa hostile to the young man and not take him seriously as a student until the guru receives an omen So why does this story turn out to be so satisfying For one thing, for all his powers, Milarepa is constantly confronting challenges that keep the story tight I should again emphasize that this is nominally a work of biography It just doesn t read like one because of all the magic and the classic story elements Few people have such a novel shaped life A hagiography is aapt descriptor but instead of only displaying Milarepa s good side boring , this book presumably dances around facts to make aengrossing product While Milarepa could concoct all manner of magic, he mostly doesn t with the exception of some ESP After Marpa has taught him, Milarepa deals with people with calm and compassion His return home is a little like Alex s from A Clockwork Orange in that people have ill feelings about him because of his past, but at first they are afraid of him When they discover he can t defend himself, they start to lay into him For another, we can see Milarepa s growth and we come to respect his intense devotion tremendously as he becomes quite virtuous of the course of the book While he is a superhero, he s also an ascetic who denies himself with the utmost of discipline in pursuit of liberation I d highly recommend this book for those who like biographies especially if you like to learn about Buddhism in the process In the latter half of the book there are some lessons transmitted through the text as Milarepa interacts with students and other people Eventually, even his loathsome aunt becomes a student


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