Christian Gellert's Last Christmas

Christian Gellert's Last Christmas MOBI Î Christian


    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format city of Leipzig, but in all lands far and wideIt was Christian Furchtegott Gellert, the Poet of Fables, Hymns, and Lays, who was just leaving his collegeWhen we read his Lectures upon Morals, which were not printed until after his death, we obtain but a very incomplete idea of the great power with which they came immediately from Gellert s mouth Indeed, it was his voice, and the touching manner in which he delivered his lectures, that made so deep an impression upon his hearers and Rabener was right when once he wrote to a friend, that the philanthropic voice of Gellert belonged to his wordsAbove all, however, it was the amiable and pure personal character of Gellert which vividly and edifyingly impressed young hearts Gellert was himself the best example of pure moral teaching and the best which a teacher can give his pupils is faith in the victorious might, and the stability of the eternal moral laws His lessons were for the Life, for his life in itself was a lesson Many a victory over the troubles of life, over temptations of every kind, ay, many an elevation to nobility of thought, and to purity of action, had its origin in that lecture hall, at the feet of GellertIt was as though Gellert felt that it was the last time he would deliver these lectures that those words so often and so impressively uttered would be heard no from his mouth and there was a peculiar sadness, yet a peculiar strength, in all he said that dayHe had this day earnestly recommended modesty and humility and it appeared almost offensive to him, that people as he went should tempt him in regard to these very virtues for continually he heard men whisper, That is Gellert What is fame, and what is honor A cloak of many colors, without warmth, without protection and now, as he walked along, his heart literally froze in his bosom, as he confessed to himself that he had as yet done nothing nothing which could give him a feeling of real satisfaction Men honored him and loved him but what was all that worth His innermost heart could not be satisfied with that in his own estimation he deserved no meed of praise and where, where was there any evidence of that higher and purer life which he would fain bring about Then, again, the Spirit would comfort him and say Much seed is lost, much falls in stony places, and much on good ground and brings forth sevenfold His inmost soul heard not the consolation, for his body was weak and sore burdened from his youth up, and in his latter days yet than ever and there are conditions of the body in which the most elevating words, and the cheeriest notes of joy, strike dull and heavy on the soul It is one of the bitterest experiences of life to discover how little one man can really be to another How joyous is that youthful freshness which can believe that, by a thought transferred to another s heart, we can induce him to become another being, to live according to what he must acknowledge true, to throw aside his previous delusions, and return to the right path The youngsters go their way Do your words follow after Whither are they going What are now their thoughts What manner of life will be theirs My heart yearns after them, but cannot be with them oh, how happy were those messengers of the Spirit, who cried aloud to youth or manhood the words of the Spirit, that they must leave their former ways, and thenceforth change to other beings Pardon me, O God that I would fain be like them I am weak and vile, and yet, methinks, there must be words as yet unheard, unknown oh where are they, those words which at once lay hold upon the soul With such heavy thoughts went Gellert away from his college gate to Rosenthal."/>
  • Kindle Edition
  • Christian Gellert's Last Christmas
  • Berthold Auerbach
  • English
  • 07 August 2018

10 thoughts on “Christian Gellert's Last Christmas

  1. Greg Kerestan Greg Kerestan says:

    As Christmas stories go, this one isn t particularly festive or magical, but as a slight, moralistic fable for the season it satisfies There s a certain Trans Siberian Orchestra quality to it not the bombast of the music, but the simplicity of the season, the call for good cheer and open hearts, and the subtle implication of the supernatural guiding people to become their best selves.


  2. Beatrice Drury Beatrice Drury says:

    It is a rare gift to know that you have touched the lives of others Christian gets this gift from a peasant who had been inspired by his words.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Christian Gellert's Last Christmas➞ [Epub] ❥ Christian Gellert's Last Christmas By Berthold Auerbach ➨ – Polishdarling.co.uk Three o clock had just struck from the tower of St Nicholas, Leipzig, on the afternoon of December d, , when a man, wrapped in a loose overcoat, came out of the door of the University His countenance Three o clock had just struck from the tower of St Nicholas, Leipzig, on the afternoon of December d when a man, wrapped in a loose overcoat, came out of the door of the University His countenance was exceedingly gentle, and on his features cheerfulness still Christian Gellert's PDF \ lingered, for he had been gazing upon a hundred cheerful faces after him thronged a troop of students, who, holding back, allowed him to precede them the passengers in the streets saluted him, and some, students, who pressed forwards and hurried past him homewards, saluted him quite reverentially He returned their salutations with a surprised and almost deprecatory air, and yet he knew, and could not conceal from himself, that he was one of the best beloved, not only in the good city of Leipzig, but in all lands far and wideIt was Christian Furchtegott Gellert, the Poet of Fables, Hymns, and Lays, who was just leaving his collegeWhen we read his Lectures upon Morals, which were not printed until after his death, we obtain but a very incomplete idea of the great power with which they came immediately from Gellert s mouth Indeed, it was his voice, and the touching manner in which he delivered his lectures, that made so deep an impression upon his hearers and Rabener was right when once he wrote to a friend, that the philanthropic voice of Gellert belonged to his wordsAbove all, however, it was the amiable and pure personal character of Gellert which vividly and edifyingly impressed young hearts Gellert was himself the best example of pure moral teaching and the best which a teacher can give his pupils is faith in the victorious might, and the stability of the eternal moral laws His lessons were for the Life, for his life in itself was a lesson Many a victory over the troubles of life, over temptations of every kind, ay, many an elevation to nobility of thought, and to purity of action, had its origin in that lecture hall, at the feet of GellertIt was as though Gellert felt that it was the last time he would deliver these lectures that those words so often and so impressively uttered would be heard no from his mouth and there was a peculiar sadness, yet a peculiar strength, in all he said that dayHe had this day earnestly recommended modesty and humility and it appeared almost offensive to him, that people as he went should tempt him in regard to these very virtues for continually he heard men whisper, That is Gellert What is fame, and what is honor A cloak of many colors, without warmth, without protection and now, as he walked along, his heart literally froze in his bosom, as he confessed to himself that he had as yet done nothing nothing which could give him a feeling of real satisfaction Men honored him and loved him but what was all that worth His innermost heart could not be satisfied with that in his own estimation he deserved no meed of praise and where, where was there any evidence of that higher and purer life which he would fain bring about Then, again, the Spirit would comfort him and say Much seed is lost, much falls in stony places, and much on good ground and brings forth sevenfold His inmost soul heard not the consolation, for his body was weak and sore burdened from his youth up, and in his latter days yet than ever and there are conditions of the body in which the most elevating words, and the cheeriest notes of joy, strike dull and heavy on the soul It is one of the bitterest experiences of life to discover how little one man can really be to another How joyous is that youthful freshness which can believe that, by a thought transferred to another s heart, we can induce him to become another being, to live according to what he must acknowledge true, to throw aside his previous delusions, and return to the right path The youngsters go their way Do your words follow after Whither are they going What are now their thoughts What manner of life will be theirs My heart yearns after them, but cannot be with them oh, how happy were those messengers of the Spirit, who cried aloud to youth or manhood the words of the Spirit, that they must leave their former ways, and thenceforth change to other beings Pardon me, O God that I would fain be like them I am weak and vile, and yet, methinks, there must be words as yet unheard, unknown oh where are they, those words which at once lay hold upon the soul With such heavy thoughts went Gellert away from his college gate to Rosenthal.


About the Author: Berthold Auerbach

Berthold Auerbach February February was a German Jewish poet and author He was the founder of the German tendency novel , in which fiction is used as a means of influencing public opinion on social, political, moral, and religious questions.



10 thoughts on “Christian Gellert's Last Christmas

  1. Greg Kerestan Greg Kerestan says:

    As Christmas stories go, this one isn t particularly festive or magical, but as a slight, moralistic fable for the season it satisfies There s a certain Trans Siberian Orchestra quality to it not the bombast of the music, but the simplicity of the season, the call for good cheer and open hearts, and the subtle implication of the supernatural guiding people to become their best selves.


  2. Beatrice Drury Beatrice Drury says:

    It is a rare gift to know that you have touched the lives of others Christian gets this gift from a peasant who had been inspired by his words.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *