The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region

The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of

The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region [Download] ➾ The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region By Raymond M. Turner – Polishdarling.co.uk The Changing Mile, originally published in , was a benchmark in ecological studies, demonstrating the prevalence of change in a seemingly changeless place Photographs made throughout the Sonoran Deser The Changing Mile, originally published in , Mile Revisited: ePUB ´ was a benchmark in ecological studies, demonstrating the prevalence of change in a seemingly changeless place Photographs made throughout the Sonoran Desert region in the late s and early The Changing PDF \ s were juxtaposed with photographs of the same locations taken many decades later The nearly one hundred pairs of images revealed that climate has played a strong role in initiating many changes in the region This new Changing Mile Revisited: PDF ✓ book updates the classic by adding recent photographs to the original pairs, providing another three decades of data and showing even clearly the extent of change across the landscape During these same three decades, abundant information about climatic variability, land use, and plant ecology has accumulated, making it possible to determine causes of change with confidence Using nearly two hundred additional triplicate sets of unpublished photographs, The Changing Mile Revisited utilizes repeat photographs selected from almost three hundred stations located in southern Arizona, in the Pinacate region of Mexico, and along the coast of the Gulf of California Coarse photogrammetric analysis of this enlarged photographic set shows the varied response of the region s major plant species to the forces of change The images show vegetation across the entire region at sites ranging in elevation from sea level to a mile above sea level Some sites are truly arid, while others are located above the desert in grassland and woodland Common names are used for most plants and animals with Latin equivalents in endnotes to make the book accessible to non technical readers The original Changing Mile was based upon a unique set of data that allowed the authors to evaluate the extent and magnitude of vegetation change in a large geographic region By extending the original landmark study, The Changing Mile Revisited will remain an indispensable reference for all concerned with the fragile desert environment.


10 thoughts on “The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region

  1. Robin Robin says:

    The Changing Mile Revisited is a scientific treatise supported by pretty pictures of the desert, grassland, and oak woodland in the greater Tucson area It s an update to the original Changing Mile, in which photos from the 1880s 1930s were compared with photos taken at the same locations in the 1960s This latest edition adds photos from the 1990s for further comparison The changes in vegetation and in some cases human habitation are compared in descriptive captions Although the descriptions The Changing Mile Revisited is a scientific treatise supported by pretty pictures of the desert, grassland, and oak woodland in the greater Tucson area It s an update to the original Changing Mile, in which photos from the 1880s 1930s were compared with photos taken at the same locations in the 1960s This latest edition adds photos from the 1990s for further comparison The changes in vegetation and in some cases human habitation are compared in descriptive captions Although the descriptions are somewhat technical, it is still obvious to a non scientist whether or not a certain site has changed, and how The changing mile refers to the one mile change in elevation from the desert floor to the mountaintops, and the many plant zones contained therein This book considers the changes in the lowest 3 plant zones, the areas that have been most extensively settled and grazed.In addition to the photos, the authors include maps and descriptive text regarding all of the deserts in the US Southwest Mexican Northwest Each area s uniquely characteristic geological and weather patterns, particularly rainfall and temperature, are discussed There is also information on human activities and its impact upon vegetation in these regions, and other basic facts about the deserts, grasslands, and woodlands.At the end of the book, the scientists attempt to explain the changes in vegetation throughout the years Many areas have become brushier, and overall biomass has increased However, many saguaros cactus have died and not regenerated And yet, this might not be a permanent pattern, but a result of a few bad years in terms of rainfall and low temperatures Climate change, cattle grazing, changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, fire, woodcutting, and urbanization are discussed One does wonder what a set of photos taken in 2020 would be like.For ecology minded folks, especially those fond of the desert, this classic book is a must read Its tone is calm and analytical, not emotional or chastising Anyone who loves the desert and or old photographs will enjoy paging through this large format volume


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10 thoughts on “The Changing Mile Revisited: An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region

  1. Robin Robin says:

    The Changing Mile Revisited is a scientific treatise supported by pretty pictures of the desert, grassland, and oak woodland in the greater Tucson area It s an update to the original Changing Mile, in which photos from the 1880s 1930s were compared with photos taken at the same locations in the 1960s This latest edition adds photos from the 1990s for further comparison The changes in vegetation and in some cases human habitation are compared in descriptive captions Although the descriptions The Changing Mile Revisited is a scientific treatise supported by pretty pictures of the desert, grassland, and oak woodland in the greater Tucson area It s an update to the original Changing Mile, in which photos from the 1880s 1930s were compared with photos taken at the same locations in the 1960s This latest edition adds photos from the 1990s for further comparison The changes in vegetation and in some cases human habitation are compared in descriptive captions Although the descriptions are somewhat technical, it is still obvious to a non scientist whether or not a certain site has changed, and how The changing mile refers to the one mile change in elevation from the desert floor to the mountaintops, and the many plant zones contained therein This book considers the changes in the lowest 3 plant zones, the areas that have been most extensively settled and grazed.In addition to the photos, the authors include maps and descriptive text regarding all of the deserts in the US Southwest Mexican Northwest Each area s uniquely characteristic geological and weather patterns, particularly rainfall and temperature, are discussed There is also information on human activities and its impact upon vegetation in these regions, and other basic facts about the deserts, grasslands, and woodlands.At the end of the book, the scientists attempt to explain the changes in vegetation throughout the years Many areas have become brushier, and overall biomass has increased However, many saguaros cactus have died and not regenerated And yet, this might not be a permanent pattern, but a result of a few bad years in terms of rainfall and low temperatures Climate change, cattle grazing, changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, fire, woodcutting, and urbanization are discussed One does wonder what a set of photos taken in 2020 would be like.For ecology minded folks, especially those fond of the desert, this classic book is a must read Its tone is calm and analytical, not emotional or chastising Anyone who loves the desert and or old photographs will enjoy paging through this large format volume


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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *